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60

All modern terminal emulators use ANSI escape codes to show colours and other things. Don't bother with libraries, the code is really simple. More info is here. Example in C: #include <stdio.h> #define ANSI_COLOR_RED "\x1b[31m" #define ANSI_COLOR_GREEN "\x1b[32m" #define ANSI_COLOR_YELLOW "\x1b[33m" #define ANSI_COLOR_BLUE "\x1b[34m" ...


47

Why use freopen()? The C89 specification has the answer in one of the endnotes for the section on <stdio.h>: 116. The primary use of the freopen function is to change the file associated with a standard text stream (stderr, stdin, or stdout), as those identifiers need not be modifiable lvalues to which the value returned by the fopen ...


38

To answer the original question: Anything that can be done using stdio can be done using the iostream library. Disadvantages of iostreams: Its verbose Advantages of iostreams: Its easy to extend for new non POD types. The step forward the C++ made over C was type safety. iostreams was designed to be explicitly type safe. Thus assignment to an object ...


31

perhaps it's a binary mode issue. Try opening the file with "r+b" as the mode. EDIT: as noted in a comment "rb" is likely a better match to your original intent since "r+b" will open it for read/write and "rb" is read-only.


30

Try setvbuf(stdout, NULL, _IONBF, 0). It changes stdout to unbuffered (_IONBF) mode.


29

Read each line, and use a random number to choose whether to keep that line or ignore it. For the first line, you want odds of 1:1 to keep; for the second, you want odds of 1:2, etc. count = 0; while (fgets(line, length, stream) != NULL) { count++; if ((rand() * count) / RAND_MAX == 0) strcpy(keptline, line); } I haven't verified that ...


25

EOF is just a macro with a value (usually -1). You have to test something against EOF, such as the result of a getchar() call. One way to test for the end of a stream is with the feof function. if (feof(stdin)) Note, that the 'end of stream' state will only be set after a failed read. In your example you should probably check the return value of scanf ...


25

Here's the GNU version of printf... you can see it passing in stdout to vfprintf: __printf (const char *format, ...) { va_list arg; int done; va_start (arg, format); done = vfprintf (stdout, format, arg); va_end (arg); return done; } See here. Here's a link to vfprintf... all the formatting 'magic' happens here. The only thing that's ...


22

b - a is a ptrdiff_t, which you can print with %td in your printf format. From the spec section 6.5.6 Additive operators: When two pointers are subtracted, both shall point to elements of the same array object, or one past the last element of the array object; the result is the difference of the subscripts of the two array elements. The size of the ...


22

fgetc+ungetc. Maybe something like this: int fpeek(FILE *stream) { int c; c = fgetc(stream); ungetc(c, stream); return c; }


21

Unfortunately, HANDLEs are completely different beasts from FILE*s and file descriptors. The CRT ultimately handles files in terms of HANDLEs and associates those HANDLEs to a file descriptor. Those file descriptors in turn backs the structure pointer by FILE*. Fortunately, there is a section on this MSDN page that describes functions that "provide a way to ...


20

I had this problem too (encountered through Macports compilers). Previous versions of Xcode would let you install command line tools through xcode/Preferences, but xcode5 doesn't give a command line tools option in the GUI, that so I assumed it was automatically included now. Try running this command: xcode-select --install


18

Can somebody please point out my stupid mistake? Windows platform, I guess? Use this: FILE* f = fopen("test.png", "rb"); instead of this: FILE* f = fopen("test.png", "r"); See msdn for explanation.


17

You have two choices: Use fileno() to obtain the file descriptor associated with the stdio stream pointer Don't use <stdio.h> at all, that way you don't need to worry about flush either - all writes will go to the device immediately, and in theory the write() call won't even return until the lower-level IO has completed. For device-level IO I'd say ...


17

stdio.h is standard, but deprecated. Always prefer cstdio in C++. [n3290: C.3.1/1]: For compatibility with the Standard C library, the C++ standard library provides the 18 C headers (D.5), but their use is deprecated in C++. [n3290: D.5/3]: [ Example: The header <cstdlib> assuredly provides its declarations and definitions within the ...


16

No, there's no guarantee that it won't. However, most implementations I've seen tend to use a fixed size buffer for creating the formatted output string (a). In terms of glibc (source here), there are calls to malloc within stdio-common/vfprintf.c, which a lot of the printf family use at the lower end, so I wouldn't rely on it if I were you. Even the ...


15

It's just too verbose. Ponder the iostream construct for doing the following (similarly for scanf): // nonsense output, just to examplify fprintf(stderr, "at %p/%s: mean value %.3f of %4d samples\n", stats, stats->name, stats->mean, stats->sample_count); That would requires something like: std::cerr << "at " << ...


15

Just set stdout to be line buffered at the beginning of your C program (before performing any output), like this: #include <stdio.h> setvbuf(stdout, NULL, _IOLBF, 0); or #include <stdio.h> setlinebuf(stdout); Either one will work on Linux, but setvbuf is part of the C standard so it will work on more systems. By default stdout will be ...


15

I think what you are looking for may be int fsync(int fd); or int fdatasync(int fd); fsync will flush the file from kernel buffer to the disk. fdatasync will also do except for the meta data.


15

Use something like this to redirect stderr to a pipe. Have a reader on the other side of the pipe write to logcat: extern "C" void Java_com_test_yourApp_yourJavaClass_nativePipeSTDERRToLogcat(JNIEnv* env, jclass cls, jobject obj) { int pipes[2]; pipe(pipes); dup2(pipes[1], STDERR_FILENO); FILE *inputFile = fdopen(pipes[0], "r"); char ...


14

If you're on a POSIXy system (which I assume you are, since you have fileno()), you can use dup() to clone the file descriptor: int newfd = dup(fileno(stream)); fclose(stream); Or you can hand fdopen() a duplicate file descriptor: FILE *stream = fdopen(dup(fd), "r"); Either way, the other copy of the fd won't close with the FILE *. However, keep in ...


14

Instead of printf("Error");, you should try perror("Error") which may print the actual reason of failure (like Permission Problem, Invalid Argument, etc).


14

Huh? I see no reason why cout should fail simply because you executed std::cout << 0 << std::endl; It should output 0\n. And it does. End of story. (In case you're confused, please know that in C++, #define NULL (0).) In case you wrote: T* p = 0; std::cout << p << std::endl; then it will display the address 0, (generally in ...


14

The following method is a handy general purpose tool. Note especially the use of the ensure clause to restore $stdout (and avoid astonishment): def with_captured_stdout begin old_stdout = $stdout $stdout = StringIO.new('','w') yield $stdout.string ensure $stdout = old_stdout end end So, for example: >> str = ...


13

I think you're looking for something like freopen()


13

putStrLn :: String -> IO () getLine :: IO String The types do not match. getLine is an IO action, and putStrLn takes a plain string. What you need to do is bind the line inside the IO monad in order to pass it to putStrLn. The following are equivalent: a = do line <- getLine putStrLn line a = getLine >>= \line -> putStrLn line a ...


13

The code will probably print "ciao" twice as standard output is buffered IO so the internal buffer for standard output will be replicated in the child process and both buffers flushed when each process, the parent and child, exits. It is unrelated to optimization.


12

DO NOT DO a close on fileno(FILE*). FILE is a buffering object. Looking into its implementation and meddling with its state carries all the caveats and dangers that would come with similar misbehavior on any other software module. Don't do it. AGH. Seriously. Nasty.


12

The result of b - a is only defined when both a and b point to elements of the same char array. This requirement can also be interpreted as a and b pointing to bytes belonging to the same object, since every object can be re-interpreted as a char array. Otherwise, the result is undefined. I.e. an attempt to subtract such pointers results in undefined ...


12

You could consider running the program via subprocess.Popen, with subprocess.PIPE communication, and then shove that output where ever you would like, but as is, os.system just runs the command, and nothing else. from subprocess import Popen, PIPE p = Popen(['command', 'and', 'args'], stdout=PIPE, stderr=PIPE, stdin=PIPE) output = p.stdout.read() ...



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