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You need to use c_str() to access the character pointer to pass to fprintf: fprintf(errorLog, "%s Error: %s\n", timeString, errorString.c_str()); It's also generally more efficient in most cases to accept your parameter as a const reference const std::string& errorString than to force construction of a new string for the parameter when it may not be ...


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Sure, it's easy. You can read from a file containing that character, or you can do something like (under Linux and similar operating systems): printf "\r" | yourProgram Or even from a terminal program that allows escapes, such as CTRL-VCTRL-M. However, that's not considered end of line in the C world, which subscribes to the LF method for indicating end ...


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It is definitely the buffering of stdio getting in the way. I received the same output with both the MSVC2012 and mingw-w64 implementations. I decided to switch from the stdio layer to the POSIX layer, and the output was: Hello world! Goodbye, cruel world! Your code, slightly modified: #include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> #include ...


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This might have to do with some buffering stdio.h adds to output. Try adding a fflush(fout); after the fprintf. Alternatively you could try a setbuf(fout, null); to disable buffering for your output stream. As to the "bonus" (printf working correctly): Afaik stoutis usually set up in a way that it flushes automatically after each newline.


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It almost certainly has to do with stdio buffering, although in theory fout should not be fully-buffered. C11 §7.21.5.3/8: "When opened, a stream is fully buffered if and only if it can be determined not to refer to an interactive device. The error and end-of-file indicators for the stream are cleared." So it may well not be possible for the Windows ...


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stdio is for standard IO in C. It should have a .h at the end. In C++, all C headers have been encapsulated in cxxxxxx headers (without .h). So, <stdio.h> is the same as <cstudio>. These offer functions, like printf and scanf, for simple IO. iostream on the other hand is an IO library for C++, and offers streams like cin and cout, as you ...


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Nonstandard Headers <stdio> is not defined in any of the standards that I know of. Standardized Headers for C <stdio.h> is the c header containing functions like printf() and scanf(). Standardized Headers for C++ <stdio.h> is included in the c++ standard but is deprecated. <cstdio> is the c++ header that includes things like ...


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there is no stdio (stdio.h and cstdio). the 'c' and the missing '.h' in the header name indicates that it's the C++ version of the C header. check cstdio and iostream (references) some compilers (including MSVC) include stl headers in other stl headers which leads to the effect you observed. this is not portable though! if you are concerned with ...


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It depends on which implementation of the standard library you use, but if you are mainstream and compile with gcc you can find the path of an library used to link with $ gcc -print-file-name=libc.so /usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-linux-gnu/4.9/../../../x86_64-linux-gnu/libc.so Take into account that you can have more than one implementation installed in your ...


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If I compile a simple hello world C program I get this: % ldd easy linux-vdso.so.1 => (0x00007fffcc9fe000) libc.so.6 => /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libc.so.6 (0x00007f4a90eb6000) /lib64/ld-linux-x86-64.so.2 (0x00007f4a91299000) Why does it need libc ? % nm easy ... 000000000040052d T main U printf@@GLIBC_2.2.5 The symbol printf is being ...


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% comes into format specifiers. example . when we write printf("%d",20); the it will print 20 rather then %d. cause compiler treat % as a format specifier.In the mind of compiler the meaning of % is somewhat special. so if you want that "%" should be the output then you must write printf("%%"). Here the first % sign will suppress the meaning of % format ...


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That is what printf does: it is print formatted (f for formatted). It uses % as the formatting character. It is the only reserved character, and needs to be escaped to represent it self, i.e. %%. See the manual for more info on formatting http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/cstdio/printf/ . P.S. never put a string that is not a part of the program as the ...


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For C printf, % is a special character which typically indicates a parameter to substitute at that position: printf("Hello, %s!\n", "world!"); results in "Hello, world". There's lots of different things you can put after the % depending on the data you want to output. So that leaves the problem of "What if I want to print a percent symbol"? The solution: ...


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From the standard ISO/IEC 9899:1999 (E) 7.19.6.1 Each conversion specification is introduced by the character %. The conversion specifiers and their meanings are: % - A % character is written. No argument is converted. The complete conversion specification shall be %%.


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Disclaimer: It's been 5 days and no one has posted an "official" answer, so I'm making this answer and accepting it. Credit goes to Christophe and Retired Ninja for actually answering the question. The simple answer is that you need to open binary files in binary mode (by adding a 'b' to fopen's 2nd argument). By default, fopen opens files in text mode, ...



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