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13

To expand on ypocat's answer, since it won't let me comment: start-stop-daemon --start --quiet --chuid $DAEMONUSER \ --make-pidfile --pidfile $PIDFILE --background \ --startas /bin/bash -- -c "exec $DAEMON $DAEMON_ARGS > /var/log/some.log 2>&1" Using 'exec' to run the daemon allows stop to correctly stop the child process instead of ...


8

Firstly, +1 for realising how thread-unsafe many of the examples on stack overflow are! The solution is to use a thread-safe object (like a Python Queue.Queue) to mediate the transfer of information. I've attached some sample code below which redirects stdout to a Python Queue. This Queue is read by a QThread, which emits the contents to the main thread ...


8

There is contextlib.redirect_stdout() function in Python 3.4: from contextlib import redirect_stdout with open('help.txt', 'w') as f: with redirect_stdout(f): print('it now prints to `help.text`') It is similar to: import sys from contextlib import contextmanager @contextmanager def redirect_stdout(new_target): old_target, sys.stdout = ...


8

One simple way to do this is to use a Pipe to abstract out reads and writes to handles. One type you can use is: example :: Monad m => Pipe String String m () For example, let's say that your original code looked something like this: original :: IO () original = do str1 <- getLine str2 <- getLine putStrLn (str1 ++ str2) The new ...


7

As far I understand, you want to preserve the order of stdout/stderr messages. I don't see any DECENT way to do this with C# managed Process(reflection - yes, nasty subclassing hacking - yes). It seems that it's pretty much hardcoded. This functionality does not depend on threads themselves. If you want to keep the order, STDOUT and STDERROR have to use ...


7

Since your question seems to be just for information, a windows app without a console, has its stdout, stderr handles closed. Any function that tries to output to those handles, simply gets called, checks for an open handle, finds it closed, and returns without doing anything else. You might say, your output in this case ends up nowhere to be found :) If ...


7

How about the following code? >>> a = numpy.array([[2., 0., 0.], [0., 2., 0.], [0., 0., 4.]]) >>> numpy.savetxt(sys.stdout, a, fmt='%.4f') 1.0000 2.0000 3.0000 0.0000 2.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 4.0000 In Python 3+, use numpy.savetxt(sys.stdout.buffer, ...).


6

Change: while (<OUT>) { print ... print ... } to: print OUT ... print OUT ... <> is for reading, not writing. Your code is reading from the file, which is empty, so it never even enters the loop (which would have printed out to STDOUT, not the file). Also, if you are just reading, use <, not +<. If you are just writing, use ...


6

To expand on davor's answer, you can use PowerShell like this: powershell "dir | tee test.txt" If you're trying to redirect the output of an exe in the current directory, you need to use .\ on the filename, eg: powershell ".\something.exe | tee test.txt"


6

2>&1 means "redirect stderr to where stdout is currently connected", and redirections are processed in order from left to right. So the first one does: Redirect stdout to the fail.out file. Redirect stderr to stdout's current connection, i.e. the fail.out file The second one does: Redirect stderr to stdout's current connection, i.e. the ...


6

There is contextlib.redirect_stdout() function in Python 3.4: import io from contextlib import redirect_stdout with io.StringIO() as buf, redirect_stdout(buf): print('redirected') output = buf.getvalue() Here's code example that shows how to implement it on older Python versions.


6

uint8_t is an alias for unsigned char. You're essentially printing a character with the value 0xab, which might be an invalid character depending on your encoding. This would be solvable by casting it to another integer type, converting its value to a string in advance or writing some sort of a wrapper class that implements std::ostream& ...


6

It's lazyness. stderr was created to print error messages, so you can redirect the output of a program without having mixed error messages. Also, I think stderr is unbuffered by default, so if your program crash, all the error messages up to the point where it crashed are printed (this behaviour can be modified by the use of setvbuf).


6

In order to provide a thread-safe & cross platform solution, I have adapted rmflow's approach into a similar interface. As this class modifies global file descriptors, I adapted it to a mutex-guarded static class that protects against multiple instances thrashing global file descriptors. In addition, rmflow's answer does not clean up all of the used file ...


6

Yes, because it's the output of the other process. You're only able to read from it. From the documentation. Gets a stream used to read the output of the application. I know it's a bit confusing, but think of it as StandardOutput from the perspective of the process. (Not from your perspective, as another process looking at it.) If you want to write ...


6

tree (and some other commands) print their help to stderr, not stdout. You could simply redirect both by using |& instead of |: tree --help |& head -n2


6

Static initializers in C have to be compile-time constants. Since stdout is not required to be such, you have to initialize the global variable in your dynamic program execution: #include <stdio.h> FILE * outFile; int main(void) { outFile = stdout; /* ... */ } (Specifically (cf. C11 7.21.1/3), stdout is mereley specified to be a macro ...


6

This is not a good way of checking for success or failure. You should instead rewrite myTest.jar to use System.exit(0) on success and System.exit(1) (or higher) on error. If the program is well written, it will already do this. You can then check for success or failure in bash using e.g. if java -jar mytest.jar then echo "The command succeeded :D" else ...


5

stdin, stderr, and stdout are file descriptors (or FILE* wrappers around them, if you mean the C stdio objects bearing those names). File descriptors are numbers that index a per-process data structure in the kernel. That data structure records which I/O channels a process has open, I/O channel being my ad-hoc term for a file, device, socket, or pipe. By ...


5

I try to use logging when possible, but I've found that in some scenarios seeing the output is important. Here's the short version of the way I do it. Substituting the execute resource for the bash resource also works fine. Both standard error and standard output go into the file. results = "/tmp/output.txt" file results do action :delete end cmd = ...


5

On Linux, void main(void) is undefined behaviour; the return type is int — no exceptions. On Windows, the rules are different; on Unix, they're simple — main() returns int! Use '\r' carriage return and fflush(): #include <stdio.h> int main(void) { int i; for (i = 1; i <= 10; i++) { printf("\r%d", i); ...


5

This seems to do the trick: C:\Users\Bartek>python -i -c "" >>> print "I ♥ Python!" I ♥ Python! >>> exit() C:\Users\Bartek> The -i option is described as: -i : inspect interactively after running script; forces a prompt even if stdin does not appear to be a terminal; also PYTHONINSPECT=x So as long as you're ...


5

Configure a logger in config/environments/test.rb: config.logger = Logger.new(STDOUT) config.logger.level = Logger::ERROR This will interleave any errors that are logged during testing to STDOUT. You may wish to route the output to STDERR or use a different log level instead. Sending these messages to both the console and a log file requires something ...


5

You should not rely on ordering of stdout and stderr. They are two separate streams, and should be treated as such. That said, the difference you're seeing is likely an effect of stdlib's buffering when output is not a tty. If you're on a GNU system, you can try cmd=$(stdbuf -o 0 -e 0 plutil -key "ID" file1.plist file2.plist file3.plist file4.plist ...


5

The first line does not have "..." but a single character "…" Change: std::cout << "Connecting to hello world server…" << std::endl; to std::cout << "Connecting to hello world server..." << std::endl;


5

#!/bin/bash exec >file 2>&1 echo "Testing 123 " You can read more about exec here


5

Are you using bash? If so: command >/dev/null |& grep "something" http://www.gnu.org/software/bash/manual/bashref.html#Pipelines


5

echo "We're about to find out what we like." >/dev/tty


5

sys.stdout is a file object corresponding to the program's standard output. You can use its write() method. Note that it's probably not necessary to use the with statement, because stdout does not have to be opened or closed. So, if you need to create a csv.writer object, you can just say: import sys spamwriter = csv.writer(sys.stdout)



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