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5

See cppreference's section on aggregate initialization. The effects of aggregate initialization are: Each array element or non-static class member, in order of array subscript/appearance in the class definition, is copy-initialized from the corresponding clause of the initializer list. If the initializer clause is a nested braced-init-list, ...


4

In the general sense you would replace: std::vector<std::string> equationHalf; ... equationHalf = leftHalf // same for rightHalf with std::vector<std::string>* equationHalf; ... equationHalf = &leftHalf // same for rightHalf And then replace any instance of equationHalf. with equationHalf->. Though, in your case, I might ...


4

This use: vector<shared_ptr<T>> will allow you to pass instances of type T from this vector to some other parts of code without fear that they will not be freed. Even if your vector will no longer exist. shared_ptr<vector<T>> on the other hand protects only vector, its elements of type T are not protected against memory leaks. I ...


4

There are two things that can conflict differently in different environments: The first is auto as a deduced type is a C++11 feature. May be the linux compiler does not have it as a default (just use -std=c++11, and if it does not have it, upgrade!) The other is that the return type of std::count is size_t, not int, and size_t to int conversion may lose ...


4

The reason you get this warning is that on a 64 bit build, the standard containers use 64 bit values for size types, and implicitly converting a 64 bit value (e.g. size_t) to a 32 bit value (e.g. int) can lose data. The actual data type returned by the count function, which in this case would be std::vector<T>::difference_type, is probably the best ...


4

Your constructor should take its argument by const reference X(VectorType const & params) ^^^^^ Otherwise, you can't pass a temporary vector (as you try to do), since temporaries can't bind to non-const lvalue references.


3

Here is an example of using the MAT-API: test_mat.cpp #include "mat.h" #include <iostream> #include <vector> void matread(const char *file, std::vector<double>& v) { // open MAT-file MATFile *pmat = matOpen(file, "r"); if (pmat == NULL) return; // extract the specified variable mxArray *arr = matGetVariable(pmat, ...


3

X has 3 constructors: Your user-defined one, which suppresses the automatic default-ctor: X(VectorType& params) The automatic copy-ctor and move-ctor: X(X&&) noexcept X(const X&) The custom one expects an lvalue, never an xvalue or a constant object. You probably want to split the ctor thus: X(const VectorType& params) : ...


3

It's because array initialization is built a bit different from vector. To initialize an array you need to use two braces. Because of a syntax feature you can skip it if you initialize just one object. So the following is ok: array{1,2,3} -> array{{1,2,3}} But in your example you initialize multiple objects so the compiler doesn't add additional ...


2

There is no error in the following piece of code: float arr[4]; arr[0] = 6.28; arr[1] = 2.50; arr[2] = 9.73; arr[3] = 4.364; std::vector<float*> vec = std::vector<float*>(); vec.push_back(arr); float* ptr = vec.front(); for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++) printf("%g\n", ptr[i]); OUTPUT IS: 6.28 2.5 9.73 4.364 IN CONCLUSION: ...


2

No you do not need to explicitly destroy or delete it. The vector is held by value in your class, so will be destroyed automatically, and the data inside the vector will be deleted by the vector's own destructor. The term for all this is RAII, and it works really well.


2

Here's another idea. If you're allergic to bare pointers in C++ code (nothing wrong with them, by the way), you could wrap the bare pointer in a boost or C++11 smart pointer with a deleter that calls the correct mxDestroyArray() when the pointer goes out of scope. That way you don't need a copy, nor does your user code need to know how to correctly ...


1

You can first get the data pointer of the mxArray *pdata and then copy data to vector<double> pdata_v: double *ptr = (double *) mxGetData(pdata); pdata_v.resize(numOfData); memcpy(&pdata_v[0], ptr, numOfData*sizeof(double)); ps1: Pay extra attention to that, in MATLAB, matrice are in col-major order. So if pdata stores [1 2 3; 4 5 6], pdata_v ...


1

No, you don't. You only use delete to match a use of new. Since (in this case) you used auto storage class, the vector will be deleted automatically when the Test that owns it is destroyed.


1

Adding this as a separate answer, because it's a completely separate thing from my first suggestion. In the loop in bkt, you declare a new, locallly scoped i, which hides the function parameter and has an undefined value. Using this i is probably why you get the exception.


1

You need to use *v not &v since container element type vector<int> is different from type of &v i.e. vector<int>** vec2vec->push_back( *v )


1

From the code what I interpreted is that the code should be able to add array as as well as individual double data and hence maybe instead of using vector<double *>, you can use vector <double>. #include <iostream> #include <vector> using namespace std; class A { public: std::vector<double> getData() { return ...


1

When you push data1, you're actually pushing a pointer to the first element of data1 (there's an implicit conversion at that point). Since data1 is local to the function, that pointer becomes invalid as soon as setData returns. You need to use dynamic allocation for that as well, or store vectors in your vector.


1

double data1[] = {1}; is local to setData(), getting destroyed after setData exits and the content inside vector becomes dangling. Use : double *data1 = new double (1.0); again in setData() to see a 2


1

As far as I am aware you can't directly, if you know the vectors haven't grown, that is to say they haven't been moved to a new chunk of memory, you could take the memory address of the object you have the pointer to, minus the memory address of the first object in the array, to give you the number of the address in a single dimensional array, then you could ...



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