Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

6

Perhaps you're searching for this: template <typename... Args> A(int n, Args&&... args) : // First argument should probably be std::size_t mVector(n, T(std::forward<Args>(args)...)) {} However, you could just take a const T& and expect the caller to give you one.


5

You misinterpret the bytes. On a little-endian machine, the value 0x0031A538 is represented with the sequence of bytes 38 A5 31 00. So, your highlights are shifted. Actually you have four addresses here: 0x00319D00, 0x0031A538, 0x0031A550 and again 0x0031A550. A vector minimally needs three values to control its data, one of them being, obviously, the ...


3

Iterators and references to elements are invalidated, but not container itself. It's normal code.


2

Your API returning a pair of std::vector iterators already makes it public knowledge that the rows of your 2d array are std::vectors, so you might as well keep it simple and do something like std::vector<Type> const &operator[](size_t i) const { return vec2d[i]; } std::vector<Type> &operator[](size_t i) { return vec2d[i]; } And let ...


2

Use std::getline to get the entire line, then split the line into separate strings based on a tab delimiter. Something like this: #include <sstream> std::string line; std::vector<std::vector<std::string>> data; while(std::getline(in, line)) { std::string phrase; std::vector<std::string> row; std::stringstream ss(line); ...


2

If every line has the format "word number number number ...", use a stringstream and skip the word by reading it. If the current line is in line: vector<int> out; istringstream in(line); string word; in >> word; int x = 0; while (in >> x) { out.push_back(x); }


2

split the string on spaces since that seems to be your delimiter. Then check that each substring contains an int with strol. Then use stoi to convert the integer substrings to int. If no stoi conversion can be performed (the string does not contain a number), an invalid_argument exception is thrown, so don't try to convert the name substring. #include ...


2

This seems pretty straightforward: char **ptr; size_t n_items; // ... vector<string> vec( ptr, ptr + n_items );


2

This has been a long standing issue discussed asked and asked over again on forums and mailing lists. As thuga correctly showed in the comment, this is the corresponding bugreport to monitor: Code completion does not work for std::vector of objects Note that QtCreator was primarily meant for working with Qt code and so you would use QVector in such ...


1

This is not possible; C++03 requires that elements of a vector be CopyConstructible and Assignable. Rreference: C++03 [lib.containers.requirements]/3 The type of objects stored in these components must meet the requirements of CopyConstructible types (20.1.3), and the additional requirements of Assignable types. where "these components" means ...


1

I would imagine the only way to truly answer this question would be to write two routines, one using the loop you provided, and the other using memcmp. Then, analyze and look at the diassembly to see which looks to be the most efficient. (You could also be obsessive and use a profiler.) One might also write a custom routine in assembly to compare them ...


1

Here are some suggestions to improve the speed. Use Local Variables if possible Instead of using pointers, e.g. -> operator, use local variables or pass the variables as references. The compiler may generate extra code for loading a pointer into a register then dereferencing the the register to get the value. Use Processor's Data Cache Most modern ...


1

Assuming that the name comes first, here is a function that will read the string and add to the map. #include <map> #include <vector> #include <sstream> #include <string> #include <algorithm> using namespace std; typedef std::map<std::string, std::vector<int> > StringMap; void AddToMap(StringMap& sMap, const ...


1

Here is a program that demonstrates an approach to the task that can be used. #include <iostream> #include <string> #include <vector> #include <map> #include <sstream> #include <iterator> int main() { std::string s( "Adam 2 5 1 5 3 4" ); std::map<std::string, std::vector<int>> m; std::string key; ...


1

You can't take ownership of the memory from a vector, but you can solve your underlying problem another way. Here's how I'd approach it - its a bit hacky because of the static global variable and not thread safe, but it can be made so with some simple locking around accesses to the registry object. static std::map<T*, std::vector<T>*> registry; ...


1

use find() and substr() of string Class to find the name if it is always at the beginning of the string. std::string s = "Adam 2 5 1 5 3 4"; std::string delimiter = " "; s.substr(0, s.find(delimiter)); //To get the name s.erase(0, s.find(delimiter)); //To delete the name //Repeat the mechanism with a for or a while for the numbers I do not test this ...


1

The reference to the vector continues to be valid. If you have any pointers or references (including iterators) to parts of the vector buffer, then these are invalidated by a reallocation, which might happen as a consequence of push_back. You don't show any such pointers or references to the buffer, though.


1

Looks like vector<double*> &vect should be vector<double> &vect



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible