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86

For the original C++03 std::pair, functions to access the members would serve no useful purpose. As of C++11 and later (we're now at C++14, with C++17 coming up fast) std::pair is a special case of std::tuple, where std::tuple can have any number of items. As such it makes sense to have a parameterized getter, since it would be impractical to invent and ...


23

Getters and setters are usually useful if one thinks that getting or setting the value requires extra logic (changing some internal state). This can then be easily added into the method. In this case std::pair is only used to provide 2 data values. Nothing more, nothing less. And thus, adding the verbosity of a getter and setter would be pointless.


15

Can I completely safe rewrite my program to the new modern STL notation and get rid of the old C code? First, STL is not new; it dates back to well before C++ itself was standardized. Second, we call it the C++ standard library. Third, as long as your threads follow the requirements of C++ (ie: don't terminate in a way that C++ doesn't allow), and you don'...


13

The short answer is: no. std::vector<Object*> and std::vector<const Object*> are two different, independent classes. They are as different from each other as class A is from class B. It is often thought that just because both of them start with std::vector, that they are somehow related to each other. This is not true, and for that reason there ...


10

In emplace_back, the container is the one that constructs the Bar. But that constructor is private and the container is not a friend, so it fails. But push_back(*this) is equivalent to push_back(Bar(*this)). That is, it's the Foo that's doing the construction and it is a friend.


10

The reason is that no real invariant needs to be imposed on the data structure, as std::pair models a general-purpose container for two elements. In other words, an object of type std::pair<T, U> is assumed to be valid for any possible first and second element of type T and U, respectively. Similarly, subsequent mutations in the value of its elements ...


8

It could be argued that std::pair would be better off having accessor functions to access its members! Notably for degenerated cases of std::pair there could be an advantage. For example, when at least one of the types is an empty, non-final class, the objects could be smaller (the empty base could be made a base which wouldn't need to get its own address). ...


7

What's about std::includes algorithm? Here's a short usage example: vector<int> v1 { 1, 2, 4, 8 }; vector<int> v2 { 1, 2, 3, 8 }; set<int> s { 0, 1, 2, 4, 8, 16 }; cout << includes(s.begin(), s.end(), v1.begin(), v1.end()) << endl; cout << includes(s.begin(), s.end(), v2.begin(), v2.end()) << endl; Output: 1 0


7

std::count(data.begin(), data.end(), v); would do it. (Although if the vector is sorted you can get the result out in O(Log N) using std::lower_bound and std::upper_bound). You just need to make sure that v is exactly the same type as the vector element - unless you tell the compiler which template instantiation you want to use.


7

It makes sense that, on sorted data these algorithms will give faster results, but why can't they handle unsorted data too ? Why most of the algorithms are designed with data dependencies like these ?. For the algorithms where "It makes sense" to have data sorted, the developer should know whether that will be the case or not, and can easily sort the input ...


7

Getters and setters are useful if one believes that abstraction is warranted to insulate users from design choices and changes in those choices, now or in the future. The typical example for "now" is that the setter/getter might have logic to validate and/or calculate the value - e.g., use a setter for a phone number, instead of directly exposing the ...


6

The problem is not with your functor but with the container type you're using. You cannot use std::remove_if with a std::set (your StrSet in this case). Put simply, std::remove_if does not remove anything but just changes the order of elements such that the "removed" elements only appear after a certain point. Only erase really eliminates them. A std::set, ...


6

Your code has undefined behavior. When you use cm = (cm_sketch *) malloc(sizeof(cm_sketch)); You allocate enough storage for a cm_sketch and you have cm point to it. malloc though does not call the constructor for the object you created. So right now you have a object where all of the members are uninitialized. Using those uninitialized variables is ...


6

If you need a parameter in your comparator, you'll need to use a function object. Something along the lines of your class. I think you'll need to make the function call operator a const member. You'd use it something like this: std::set<MyObj, Comparator> myObjSet(Comparator(100));


6

25.3.9 [alg.unique]/1 Effects: For a nonempty range, eliminates all but the first element from every consecutive group of equivalent elements referred to by the iterator i in the range [first + 1,last) for which the following conditions hold: *(i - 1) == *i or pred(*(i - 1), *i) != false.


6

get_second takes a pair of the wrong type, with a non-const key. Therefore a converted temporary is constructed and you are returning a reference to this temporary. All bets are off after that.


5

Just use two function templates for operator(): struct sizeVisitor : boost::static_visitor<size_t> { template <class T> size_t operator()(T const&) { return 1; } template <class T> size_t operator()(std::vector<T> const& v) { return v.size(); } }; The template partial ...


5

Can we do something like this using c++ STLs Yes. Although, you are probably using the standard library instead. If yes, how am I going to initialize the elements? You initialize the elements the same way you initialize the elements of a vector that isn't in a pair. List-initialization is a neat option. I was trying to do this but it isn't ...


5

The comparator for a map needs to be a "strict weak ordering," i.e. it cannot be that Comp(A,B) returns true and also Comp(B,A) returns true. Your comparator is a violation of this.


5

All of std::unique_ptr's constructors* are noexcept malloc won't throw any exception on failure... it will just return nullptr. I believe your deleter's constructors won't throw anything either. So you don't need to catch anything, since nothing will be thrown. *: See C++11 §20.7.1.2.1 unique_ptr constructors [unique.ptr.single.ctor]


5

If you read the documentation for operator> it says lexicographically compares the values in the stack Therefore they will compare the first elements, if those are equal move to the second elements, etc. You can read more about lexicographical comparsion here. Lexicographical comparison is an operation with the following properties: ...


5

When you call std::remove/remove_if, it moves elements which don't satisfy the condition to the front of the range. The values of any remaining elements (starting from the position of the returned iterator) are unspecified. Some people seem to think that it swaps the elements such that the ones which satisfy the condition are moved to the back. But the ...


5

No, they're not that protected. C++ makes it easy to be correct: std::vector<int> v; for (int i : v) // cannot go out of bounds but in general it cannot always prove up front that you're correct: std::vector<int> v = something(); int i = v[v[0]]; // How would the compiler know if it's legal? To make this safe regardsless of the contents of ...


5

This is not C++11, in the sense that no C++11 features are used, and nothing is obfuscated. You can rewrite the code as follows, assuming that graph is non-const: std::vector<int> & g0 = graph[S]; int & g1 = g0[i]; if (!visisted[g1]) dfs1(g1);


5

This is not possible (as one-liner) without using some kind of boilerplate or external dependency (boost for example, see other answers) A two-liner using std::generate: std::vector<std::pair<char, int>> v(26); std::generate(v.begin(), v.end(), [] { static char c = 'a'; return std::make_pair(c++, -1);} );


4

Unfortunately, in C++ you cannot simply use auto set={2.3};, because this creates not a set, but an std::initializer_list. However, with the help of template<typename Tp> inline std::unordered_set<Tp> make_set(Tp const&x) { return {x}; } you can use auto set = make_set(2.3); without the need to specify the type of set explicitly (as in ...


4

std::unordered_set<UsertType> set = {typeVariable} Or for a fully working code including a set generated as a temporary: #include <iostream> #include <unordered_set> using namespace std; int main() { /* First (unused in the rest of the code) set */ std::unordered_set<int> set = {1}; /* Set generated on the fly, if you ...


4

The correct way is to use an iterator: template <class ForwardIter> void print(ForwardIter begin, ForwardIter end) { for (; begin != end; ++begin) cout << *begin << " "; cout << endl; } This is how standard library functions are container-agnostic, and you should write functions this way too. The reason for this is ...


4

You are creating new generators every time you want to use a random number. I don't know how the seed is generated for these generators, but it's clearly using the same seed for each generator instance you create. What you should instead be doing is creating a single generator all of your distributions use. You might want to look at what the boost random ...


4

std::unique_ptr is the C++11 way to express exclusive ownership, but one of its most attractive features is that it easily and efficiently converts to a std:: shared_ptr. This is a key part of why std::unique_ptr is so well suited as a factory function return type. Factory functions can’t know whether callers will want to use exclusive ownership ...



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