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13

emplace_back is required to be safe for the same reason push_back is required to be safe; invalidation of pointers and references only has effect once the modifying method call returns. In practice, this means that emplace_back performing a reallocation is required to proceed in the following order (ignoring error handling): Allocate new capacity ...


7

The comparator that is used in std::map must provide a strict weak ordering of the objects. Your comparator does not. Therefore, your instance of std::map will produce undefined behavior. Note: It's generally easier to just have the comparator provide a total ordering. Additionally, let's describe what a strict weak ordering requires. Here, I'm taking ...


7

It is almost certain that the library header files have changed, therefore to remain in compliance with the One Definition Rule you must recompile everything.


7

You can have a comparison object that has a flag indicating which member to sort on. class Comparo { int m_field; public: Comparo(int field) : m_field(field) { } bool operator()(const MyClass & Left, const MyClass & right) { switch (m_field) { case 0: return left.A < right.A; ...


6

This is indeed a non-conforming O(n log n) implementation. Comparing it to the "sift up" version of heapify from the Wikipedia article on heapsort shows that it's essentially the same algorithm. Testing it on increasing integer sequences (the worst case) gives running times that nicely fit the n log n curve, and the number of comparisons needed exceeds the ...


6

Your comparison function does not implement a strict weak ordering, because it returns true whenever the LHS is not equal to the RHS. You need to change the logic to return true when one is "less than" the other. This is one example, which seems like a natural choice: return r < 0; Note that to make the intent clear, it would be better to return a ...


6

There are several approaches. The comments to your question suggest keeping a std::unordered_set that has the fastest O(1) lookup/insertion and O(N) iteration (as has every container). If you have data that changes a lot, or requires a lot of random lookups, this is probably the fastest. But test. If you need to iterate 100s of times without intermediate ...


6

Template-related error messages can be confusing at times. The problem is that the standard library does not define an overload of operator << for inserting std::vector (or any other container, for that matter) into a std::ostream. So the compiler fails to find a suitable overload for operator <<, and reports this failure as best as it's able ...


6

How does a good C++ programmer nowadays solve the following tasks? 1.Read some bytes representing a single, primitive type variable from a binary file. Use std::istream::read, if you want to "read some bytes representing a type". Use operator >> to read an instance of the type (you will have to implement this operator yourself for non-native ...


6

Well, emplace_back() does exactly that. Just use lst.emplace_back(); and that function will create an object in place at the end of the list.


6

std::map iterators are always constant with regard to the keys (think about it, if you change the key value the underlying tree risks being destroyed!), you can swap the values however: std::swap(it->second, itt->second); Disclaimer: this may or may not be what you are looking for, as I have no idea what the purpose of the swap is.


6

This is not too hard to do with a nested loop since you are using only combinations of two. That being said, my favorite library is a combinations library documented here: http://home.roadrunner.com/~hinnant/bloomington/combinations.html which contains complete (and free) source code. below I show both ways: Using the combinations library. Writing your ...


5

This is not a defect, it is by design. The rationale for this can be found in A Proposal to Add an Extensible Random Number Facility to the Standard Library (N1398) which says (emphasis mine): On the other hand, the specifications for the distributions only define the statistical result, not the precise algorithm to use. This is different from ...


5

std::set<double, EpsCompare<> > myEpsSet(EpsCompare<>(1e-5)); or std::set<double, EpsCompare<double> > myEpsSet(EpsCompare<double>(1e-5));


5

std::less<int>() is a constructor call. It creates a new std::less<int> object which, yes, has overloaded operator().


5

I'd say this is just very poorly factored code. Why not have it like this: void process_input(std::istream & is); int main(int argc, char * argv[]) { if (argc == 1) { process_input(std::cin); } else if (argc == 2) { std::ifstream is(argv[1], "rb"); process_input(is); } else if (argc == 3 && strcmp(argv[1], ...


5

Since you apparently have enough of C++11 available to use std::unordered_map, you should strongly avoid owning raw pointers. Instead of pair<bool, Trie*>, use pair<bool, unique_ptr<Trie>>. You simply cannot use the first approach, as std::pair (and all standard library containers) requires its template arguments to be complete types, ...


5

You won't get anywhere close to line speed with the standard IO streams. Buffering or not, pretty much ANY parsing will kill your speed by orders of magnitude. I did experiments on datafiles composed of two ints and a double per line (Ivy Bridge chip, SSD): IO streams in various combinations: ~10 MB/s. Pure parsing (f >> i1 >> i2 >> d) is ...


5

As per Question 1: sizeof is implemented and evaluated by the compiler. It is not a macro, and it always provides a compile-time result. Conceptually, you can imagine that the compiler replaces every sizeof with a number. As per Question 2: sizeof counts the amount of storage that one instance of S occupies. A method does not take per-instance storage, ...


5

std::shared_ptr has a converting constructor that can make a shared_ptr<Base> from a shared_ptr<Derived>, so the following should work: #include <memory> class Base { public: typedef std::shared_ptr<Base> Ptr; }; class Derived : public Base {}; int main() { Base::Ptr myPtr = std::make_shared<Derived>(); }


4

I'd suggest you to use either set or unordered_set for "filtration" and when you are done, move data to vector of fixed size


4

Obvious solution could be to use std::map<const char *, void *, CustomComparator> under the hood and wrap typecasting under template interface with inline functions. That should eliminate generation of different type of std::map for every different pointer type.


4

There is no portable way to do what you're attempting because there is no requirement that a (const_)iterator be constructible from a pointer to the underlying value type. libstdc++ happens to provide such a constructor but the VS standard library implementation doesn't. Instead, its (const_)iterator constructor takes a pointer to the underlying value type ...


4

An iterator for vector can be defined as some class. As member function returns the iterator then it is not necessary that it is a raw pointer to the first element of the array. It can be an object of that class. It is only required that the iterator would have defined operator * that will return reference to the first element of a vector provided that the ...


4

There is no implicit constructor in std::string that accepts char and can be used to convert type char to std::string. What you can use is this constructor: basic_string( size_type count, CharT ch, const Allocator& alloc = Allocator() ); so freq2.push_back(std::make_pair( std::string( 1, *it ),0)); and so on


4

If you have an old/broken compiler it might require string("hello") + std_string_object but in modern compilers the natural code "hello" + std_string_object should work.


4

Compilers typically use a strategy for implementing exceptions that has zero runtime overhead as long as none are thrown, but if an exception is thrown, then it affects your program's performance due to the exception processing mechanism which must unwind the stack. Even if this is acceptable for your use case, there's simply no advantage to using ...


4

Exception are a means of cleanly separating failure handling from normal case code. In your code they’re used for normal case, which defeats the purpose and has no advantage. In the particular case at hand use [] indexing, which automatically inserts the key if it isn’t there already. And more generally use conditional constructs for simple ...


4

If you only care about the iterator-ness of the parameter, and not the type of the container, then you can SFINAE out the other overload. First make an is_iterator trait, as shown in this answer: template <typename T> struct sfinae_true : std::true_type {}; struct is_iterator_tester { template <typename T> static ...


4

The simplest way is: auto const predicate = [](int const value) { return value % 2 == 0; }; std::copy_if(begin(src), end(src), back_inserter(dest), predicate); which relies on push_back. Now, indeed, this may trigger memory reallocation. However I'd like to underline that push_back has amortized constant complexity, meaning that in average it is O(1), ...



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