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42

The general design principle is to use std::find where possible, and implement find member functions when it is more efficient. The containers that do have a find member are containers which have a more efficient element look-up mechanism then the linear search performed in std::find. For example, binary search trees such as std::set and std::map, or hash ...


35

The most STLish way I can imagine: std::partial_sum(std::begin(v), std::end(v), std::begin(v), std::multiplies<double>()); Example: #include <iostream> #include <vector> #include <iterator> #include <numeric> #include <functional> int main() { std::vector<double> v{ 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0 }; ...


35

Here is a flowchart inspired by David Moore's version (see above) that I created, which is up-to-date (mostly) with the new standard (C++11). This is only my personal take on it, it's not indisputable, but I figured it could be valuable to this discussion:


29

No, your code is invalid. According to the C++ Standard (3.3.2 Point of declaration) 1 The point of declaration for a name is immediately after its complete declarator (Clause 8) and before its initializer (if any), except as noted below. [ Example: int x = 12; { int x = x; } Here the second x is initialized with its own (indeterminate) ...


28

My personal preference: just keep the extra index. It's clear as it is, and in case you ever have an if() inside the loop, you can also easily skip the count: std::list<std::string> items; { int i = 0; for (auto & item : items) { if (some_condition(item)) { item += std::to_string(i); // mark item as the i-th match ...


24

Question 1. Why is the string stream method consistently the worst? The classical mistake: creating a new stringstream every single time template<typename T> // 1. Using stringstream string StringFromIntegral_SS(T const &value) { thread_local stringstream ss; ss.str(""); ss.clear(); ss << value; return ss.str(); } ...


24

24.2.1/7 Most of the library’s algorithmic templates that operate on data structures have interfaces that use ranges. A range is a pair of iterators that designate the beginning and end of the computation. A range [i,i) is an empty range; in general, a range [i,j) refers to the elements in the data structure starting with the element pointed to by i ...


24

The new overloads are actually pretty great. You pass in two full ranges, beginning and end, and rather than run off the end of the shorter one and invoke undefined behaviour, the algorithm stops. Such improvements were also added to std::mismatch and std::is_permutation. You can read more about this in the proposal For std::equal, the algorithm will ...


24

It is done with a call to allocator function allocate() to get raw memory and following call to allocator construct( iterator, val) to construct an element by copy using placement new, i.e. something similar to this: /* approach similar to std::uninitialized fill taken */ template<typename T, typename A > vector<T,A>::vector( size_type n, const ...


23

Simplest cases: matching container types For the simple case where the input type matches the output type (which I've sinced realized is not what you're asking about) go one level higher. Instead of specifying the type T that your container uses, and trying to specialize on a vector<T>, etc., just specify the type of the container itself: template ...


22

If we look at the cppreference.com entry for std::vector::~vector it says: Destructs the container. The destructors of the elements are called and the used storage is deallocated. Note, that if the elements are pointers, the pointed-to objects are not destroyed. so no you don't have to call clear. If we want to go to the draft standard, we have to ...


19

copy_if is primarily for copying a range to another range/container I.e. by design, the nature of the algorithm is to copy the elements satisfying some condition to another (non-overlapping) range or to a new container. remove_if is more appropriate for what you need; it is exactly for filtering out as you expect. However, it only removes the elements by ...


19

'Old' C++: The function will not return the local variable but rather a copy of it. Your compiler might however perform an optimization where no actual copy action is made. See this question & answer for further details C++11: The function will move the value, see this answer for further details


19

std::numeric_limits<T>::is_integer was not introduced by C++11. It was just updated to use the new constexpr qualifier. std::is_integral<T> was introduced by C++11, and you're right it gives the same results. As to why it was added - possibly because the integral-ness or otherwise of a type isn't logically part of that type's numeric_limits? It ...


18

Others have covered the noexcept reasoning above. Herb spent much more time in the talk on the efficiency aspects. The problem isn't with allocations, its with unnecessary deallocations. When you copy one std::string into another the copy routine will reuse the allocated storage of the destination string if there's enough space to hold the data being ...


17

In short, there was no need to take it by reference; it amounts to a "by design" decision. I believe the reasoning centres around a few fundamentals that have existed in C++ and the Standard Library for a long time; Value semantics Imposing as few limitations on the implementation as possible The value semantics can be seen pretty much everywhere. ...


17

In C++98/03 we (obviously) had no move semantics, only copy semantics. And in C++98/03, push_back has the strong guarantee. One of the strong motivations in C++11 was to not break existing code that relied on this strong guarantee. The C++11 rules are: If is_nothrow_move_constructible<T>::value is true, move, else If ...


17

The short answer to this question is don't. Because there's no standard C++ ABI (application binary interface, a standard for calling conventions, data packing/alignment, type size, etc.), you will have to jump through a lot of hoops to try and enforce a standard way of dealing with class objects in your program. There's not even a guarantee it'll work after ...


17

Looking at the references for std::merge and std::inplace_merge you see the following complexities: For std::merge: At most std::distance(first1, last1) + std::distance(first2, last2) - 1 comparisons. And for std::inplace_merge: Exactly N-1 comparisons if enough additional memory is available, otherwise N·log(N) where N = ...


16

Your code doesn't measure what you want it to measure. The vector structure itself is usually quite small. It basically contains a few fields necessary for tracking the allocated memory and a pointer to that memory. What you want to measure is different. ------ ------------------- | i |------> | A few fields | ------ | (e.g., size and | ...


15

I would probably do something like: std::vector<int> temp; std::set_difference(a.begin(), a.end(), b.begin(), b.end(), std::back_inserter(temp)); std::swap(a, temp); Edit based on edited question: Given that your a vector is substantially larger than your b vector, there's a second question I'd consider: ...


15

Don't worry about performance, they should all be super close. Instead: If you're creating a new container that's a copy, use the copy constructor or two-iterator constructor (if different element types). If you're replacing (assigning) an existing container, use the appropriate assignment operator or assign member. If you're replacing a subset of ...


14

This is undefined behaviour in C++. paxdiablo quotes the C++03 standard: The point of declaration for a name is immediately after its complete declarator (clause 8) and before its initializer (if any) ... Example: int x = 12; { int x = x; } Here the second x is initialized with its own (indeterminate) value.


14

emplace_back is required to be safe for the same reason push_back is required to be safe; invalidation of pointers and references only has effect once the modifying method call returns. In practice, this means that emplace_back performing a reallocation is required to proceed in the following order (ignoring error handling): Allocate new capacity ...


14

Using a custom allocator seems a way to reduce the amount of time spent for building and releasing a std::set<...>. Below is a complete demo of a simple allocator together with a program profiling the resulting times. #include <algorithm> #include <chrono> #include <cstdlib> #include <iostream> #include <iterator> ...


14

There is absolutely no need to do that. std::vector and all other containers automatically destroys their elements when they themselves would be destroyed. That means that their destructors are responsible for that action. So, don't. The beauty of this is that containers are naturally exception safe[1]: void someFunc(void) { ...


14

As the commentors already stated, it depends on your Standard Library implementation. But the code that you posted is valid even for forward iterators. As such, it imposes very little requirements (only that these iterators can be incremented and dereferenced). Stepanov's classic Elements of Programming devotes an entire chapter (10) to rotate and other ...


13

Here's an algorithm version std::vector<std::vector<char>> a; std::vector<std::string> b; std::transform(a.begin(), a.end(), std::back_inserter(b), [](std::vector<char> const& v) -> std::string { return {v.begin(), v.end()}; });


13

Use the Standard Library semantics : Pass a pair of iterators to foo, not a container : it makes your function much more generic Use std::iterator_traits<Iterator>::value_type to get to the value type static_assert the value type of the Iterator to be an int (or whatever type you want) Example : #include <list> #include <vector> ...


13

find, lower_bound and upper_bound member functions are only provided when more efficient than using the non-member equivalents, or when the non-members couldn't operate given the container's public API Note in particular that std::string has a find function which provides std::find()-like linear search facilities for character searches and ...



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