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53

how about str1.localeCompare(str2)


46

You are most likely seeing the result of a compiler optimization. If we test the code using gcc on godbolt, with -O0 optimization level, we can see for the first case it does not call strcmp: movl $-1, %esi #, movl $.LC0, %edi #, movl $0, %eax #, call printf # Since your are using constants as arguments to strcmp the compiler is able for ...


36

In a SSE2 implementation, how should the compiler make sure that no memory accesses happen over the end of the string? It has to know the length first and this requires scanning the string for the terminating zero byte. If you scan for the length of the string you have already accomplished most of the work of a strcmp function. Therefore there is no benefit ...


34

if(xstrlen(str1)!=xstrlen(str2)) //computing length of str1 return -1; k=xstrlen(str1)-1; //computing length of str1 AGAIN! You're computing the length of str1 TWICE. That is one reason why your function loses the game. Also, your implemetation of xstrcmp is very naive compared to the ones defined in (most) ...


27

Javascript doesn't have it, as you point out. A quick search came up with: function strcmp ( str1, str2 ) { // http://kevin.vanzonneveld.net // + original by: Waldo Malqui Silva // + input by: Steve Hilder // + improved by: Kevin van Zonneveld (http://kevin.vanzonneveld.net) // + revised by: gorthaur // * example 1: ...


27

strcmp and other library routines are written in assembly, or specialized C code, by experienced engineers and use a variety of techniques. For example, the assembly implementation might load four bytes at a time into a register, and compare that register (as a 32-bit integer) to four bytes from the other string. On some machines, the assembly ...


25

You need to compare, not assign: if (strcmp("hello", "hello") == 0) ^ Because you want to check if the result of strcmp("hello", "hello") equals to 0. About the error: lvalue required as left operand of assignment lvalue means an assignable value (variable), and in assignment the left value to the = has to be lvalue ...


21

You are probably using optimization options when compiling. Since the result of strcmp() in the second snippet is ignored the compiler eliminates this function call and this is why your program does not crash. This call can be eliminated only because strcmp() is an intrinsic function, the compiler is aware that this function does not have any side effects.


21

I was curious about it and build a test program: #include <string.h> compare(char* String_1, char* String_2) { char TempChar_1, TempChar_2; do { TempChar_1 = *String_1++; TempChar_2 = *String_2++; } while(TempChar_1 && TempChar_1 == TempChar_2); return TempChar_1 - TempChar_2; } int main(){ int ...


18

In this sense, "less than" for strings means lexicographic (alphabetical) order. So cat is less than dog because cat is alphabetically before dog. Lexicographic order is, in some sense, an extension of alphabetical order to all ASCII (and UNICODE) characters.


16

What you need to do is create an ordering table for each character. This is also the easiest way to do case-insensitive comparisons as well. if (order_table[*s1] != order_table[*s2++]) Be aware that characters might be signed, in which case the index to your table might go negative. This code is for signed chars only: int raw_order_table[256]; int * ...


14

No, there's no (standard) way to tell whether a char * actually points to valid memory. In your situation, it is better to use std::string rather than char *s for all your strings, along with the overloaded == operator. If you do this, the compiler would enforce type safety. EDIT: As per the comments below if you find yourself in a situation where you ...


13

Don't use -- and ++ when you pass the same variable to the same function twice as two different parameters. Instead of printf("%d\n", strcmp(*(--args),*(++args))); do char *first = *(--args); char *second = *(++args); printf("%d\n", strcmp(first,second)); Still not really readable (better use indexes and check against argc for validity), but at least ...


13

fgets(string1, strlen(string1)+1, stdin); fgets(string2, strlen(string2)+1, stdin); These are wrong. string1 and string2 are not initialized, and strlen just counts the number of bytes, till hitting \0. In this case, strlen could return any (random non-negative) number. Use sizeof, instead of strlen here.


13

The strcmp() function is only defined to return a negative value if argument 1 precedes argument 2, zero if they're identical, or a positive value if argument 1 follows argument 2. There is no guarantee of any sort that the value returned will be +1 or -1 at any time. Any equality test based on that assumption is faulty. It is conceivable that the 32-bit ...


13

I think you believe that the value returned by strcmp should somehow depend on the input strings passed to it in a way that is not defined by the function specification. This isn't correct. See for instance the POSIX definition: http://pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/009695399/functions/strcmp.html Upon completion, strcmp() shall return an integer greater ...


12

No, that's not a good way to do it, because it doesn't work. if(*str1==*str2 =='\0') will get evaluated as: bool tmp1 = *str1==*str2; bool tmp2 = tmp1 == '\0'; if (tmp2) In other words, because the bool will get promoted to an integer, your test will return true whenever the strings start with different characters (tmp1 will be false, which gets ...


12

Historically, Inline has been an indication to the compiler that it should insert the function body into the call site. However, that is no longer a meaningful annotation. Modern compilers will inline a function or not regardless of the presence or absence of inline qualification. To emphasize, whether compiler will perform inline optimization is ...


12

strcmp() returns the difference of the first non-matching character between the strings. 6 - 1 is 5. When you look at it, you are probably not seeing the characters or digits—just the numbers


12

In C++, the if statement treats any nonzero value as true. A negative value is not zero, so it will be considered true. The following two statements are equivalent: if (strcmp(str1, str2)) if (strcmp(str1, str2) != 0)


11

You want to do this: strcmp(buffer, "exit\n") That is, when you enter your string and press "enter", the newline becomes a part of buffer. Alternately, use strncmp(), which only compares n characters of the string


11

In some cases std::strncmp can solve your problem: int strncmp ( const char * str1, const char * str2, size_t num ); It compares up to num characters of the C string str1 to those of the C string str2. Also, take a look, what the US DHS National Cyber Security Division recommends on this matter: Ensure that strings are null terminated before ...


10

Are you sure that the code is not intended to match on "--helpmedosoemthingwithareallylongoptionname"?


10

This sounds like s is a pointer to an array that was on the stack which is overwritten as soon as a new function is called, ie strcmp() What does the debugger say they are after the strcmp() call?


10

ISO C reserves certain identifiers for future expansion (see here), including anything that starts with "str".


10

It will crash if both the input are identical, because your loop continues beyond the terminating nul character. To fix this you must have a check for nul character inside the loop as: while (*s1==*s2) { // if s1 points to nul character, then s2 should also, because of the == // which means we've reached the end of the strings and they are equal // ...


10

You're not including the correct header file #include <cstring>


10

strcmp(listaCommand->prox>command, ">") Should be strcmp(listaCommand->prox->command, ">") In your code listaCommand->prox>command will be seen as a comparison operation, using the > operator. A comparison in C returns an integer, 0 if false, non-zero otherwise. There are good chances it will return 0, which is not a valid ...


10

Surely you want while(strcmp (choice,"one") != 0 && strcmp (choice,"two") != 0) Your current version will continue to loop if your input doesn't satisfy the not equal to one OR the not equal to two condition. If it equals one, it won't equal two etc.... Rarely do you want not equals clauses ORed together...


10

GCC in this case is using a builtin strcmp. If you want it to use the version from glibc use -fno-builtin. But you should not assume that GCC's builtin version of strcmp or glibc's implementaiton of strcmp are efficient. I know from experience that GCC's builtin memcpy and glibc's memcpy are not as efficient as they could be. I suggest you look at Agner ...



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