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-1

I also ended up in a problem similar to you. There is a small mistake in your code, you should not use the flush() method inside the while loop. Because as and when it writes the buffer to the OutputStream, it gets flushed, sent to the server which we don't want. P.S : I know I've answered it very late, but still hope someone who takes a look at this ...


1

Something like this reads all the expected data in a memorystream. Further processing of the received data is possible by using the memorystream as a stream, or by getting the bytes in it with memoryStream.ToArray(). using (var ns = new NetworkStream(socket)) { int dataLength = 0; // reading the datalength ...


1

through2.obj makes an object stream (or a stream in object mode). Through an object stream objects flow, not buffers. What you get is not a buffer, but an object obj. That is why its toString method gives [object Object]. Perhaps what you are looking for is in obj.contents?


0

The point (there are actually 17) of the articles is to point out that the F/J Framework is more of a research project than a general-purpose commercial application development framework. Criticize the object, not the man. Trying to do that is most difficult when the main problem with the framework is that the architect is a professor/scientist not an ...


0

In my personal experience, there's something else you should take on consideration before chosing one or another: if you write to the stream line by line, every line of the complete text is a chance for an I/O exception (specially when writing to disk); thus the more lines you're going to write, the more error-prone your code is. So, if there's no ...


0

There is no single answer to this. You can imagine that writing byte by byte, or character by character, usually causes overhead because each chunk of data travels through the layers of abstraction. However you can also imagine that buffering as much as possible may not be optimal, ie. if you send data over a network stream, you would like the network to ...


0

Just use it like this pictureBox1.Image = newFrame.Clone() as Bitmap;


0

The streams API makes parallelism deceptively simple. As was stated before, whether using a parallel stream speeds up your application needs to be thoroughly analysed and tested in the actual runtime context. My own experience with parallel streams streams suggests the following (and I am sure this list is far from complete): The cost of the operations ...


1

The considerations are similar to other uses of multiple threads. Only use multiple threads if you know they help. The aim is not to use every core you have, but to have a program which performs to your requirements. Don't forget multi-threading comes with an overhead, and this overhead can exceed the value you get. Multi-threading can experience large ...


2

It looks like you are trying to generate triples in which the first member is greater than the second. To start, let's generate some pairs like that: scala> def natNums = Iterator from 1 natNums: Iterator[Int] scala> def foo = for { x <- natNums; y <- 1 until x } yield (x,y) foo: Iterator[(Int, Int)] scala> (foo take 15).toList res4: ...


1

The problem here is response.GetResponseStream().Length either because this type of Stream doesn't support the Length property or, more likely, you're calling GetResponseStream twice on the same response object. I guess you can do this only once and then use this Stream a single time. You should use response.ContentLength instead to get the number of ...


0

It should be: MyPrettyPrinter(stream=f).pprint(d)


0

This works in REPL: def foo = { val s = Stream.from(1) s.flatMap(x => s.flatMap(y => s.flatMap(z => List(x,y,z)))) } scala> foo.take(15) mkString ", " res24: String = 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 1, 1, 3, 1, 1, 4, 1, 1, 5 Your f(x,y,z) must return a type that extends a subclass of GenTraversableOnce[?].


5

Just replicate t times the getLine operation with replicateM: import Control.Monad (replicateM) getLines :: Int -> IO [String] getLines t = replicateM t getLine Thus getInts, that is getInt t times, can be expressed with: getInts :: Int -> IO [Int] getInts = fmap read <$> getLines The full code rewritten to use getInts could be: import ...


0

These two cases are used in different scenario When you are using the stream class you can access the file for read and write. But when you use streamreader class you can use it to read only. This prevent the usage of file to be written. Sometimes This class is used for security purpose. e.g. for system files which are readonly.


1

A StreamReader is a TextReader which means it is a Stream wrapper. A TextReader will convert (or encode) Text data (string or char) to byte[] and write them down to the underlying Stream. Looking at the difference between the two implementations, you can see that StreamReader derives from TextReader, which, as declared, deals with text instead of bytes. It ...


6

TextReader (which StreamReader is derived from) works with strings. Stream works with bytes. The conversion between text and bytes is performed by an Encoding. Choose the right class based on whether the contents of your file text or binary. It is important to understand the difference between text and bytes.


6

You can use flatMap with Collection#stream <T> Stream<T> flatten(Stream<? extends Collection<? extends T>> stream){ return stream.flatMap(Collection::stream); } The final code would then look like this: import static java.lang.System.out; import static java.security.Provider.Service; import static ...


0

PipedInputStream has a small non-expanding buffer. Once the buffer is full, writes to the PipedOutputStream block until the buffered input is read by a different thread. You cannot use the two from the same thread, because the write will be waiting for a read that cannot happen. In your case, you are not reading any of the data until you have written all of ...


1

It's actually relatively easy to implement text/event-stream on both the server and client. Say the server at example.com is this simple server running on port 80 (the default port): import http.server import json import socketserver import time class RequestHandler(http.server.SimpleHTTPRequestHandler): def do_GET(self): ...


2

AFAIK using streams when you are doing something like sorting is a waste of cycles since you need to be finished with the sort in order to know the first element. If you have tasks that work like a sort so that you'll need to evaluate a whole set you'll end up using more time than without streams. The reason for that is that the whole stream system has a ...


0

Seems like you're using gulp as a templating engine of sorts—totally doable. Gulp lets you specify which tasks are dependent on others, so you could break out that sub-pipeline into a new task, say "buildDataFiles", then have your build task depend on that one i.e. gulp.task("build", ["buildDataFiles", "clean"], function(){ But the problem with this ...


1

Give sseclient a try: it handles SSE messages using a simple iterator-style interface.


0

I think there is no out-of-the box iOS solution for this. Try digging deep into CoreAudio framework. Or look for some ready-made librariesStreamingKit Library


0

According to your edits, instead of this: //Print the contents of the decrypted file. StreamWriter fsDecrypted = new StreamWriter(sOutputFilename); fsDecrypted.Write(new StreamReader(cryptostreamDecr).ReadToEnd()); fsDecrypted.Flush(); fsDecrypted.Close(); you can write this: static string DecryptFile(string sInputFilename, string sKey) { using (var ...


2

MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream(); using (var writer = new StreamWriter(ms)) { writer.WriteLine("testing a string"); } byte[] contentBytes = ms.ToArray(); string content = System.Text.Encoding.UTF8.GetString(contentBytes);


0

Take a look at event-stream's `split. It's made to handle line based buffering. https://github.com/dominictarr/event-stream#simple-example var es = require('event-stream') var inspect = require('util').inspect process.stdin //connect streams together with `pipe` .pipe(es.split()) //split stream to break on ...


0

You can map your database data to a Map<DateTime,Long> for quick look-ups so you only have to process it once. Then as you stream through your Set<DateCount> you can pull in updated values using peek(). Here's an example. I used Date in place of DateTime just to make it easier to code the example. Instant baseDate = Instant.now(); Date date1 = ...


3

You need a buffer-file where you can read and write the data (you wont get your data in that speed which you want to play it). Then you have to lock the Stream when you read data (buffering for example 200kb) so your streamwriter have to wait. after that you have to lock the stream to write data from server to file. edit: Here is an example what I mean: ...


0

Thanks to all, I tested my code in a txt uploaded on DropBox and Dropbox probably has code system that I don't know, infact my code returns html/script and not the content of txt. So probably the correct ask is if anybody know a website where can I put my txt file just to reading it? (the url must don't change for ever) EDIT: PROBLEM SOLVED I put my file in ...


0

If the endpoint of your URL is a text file, if shouldn't be displaying any html (unless that's what's contained in your text file.) allegedly uploadedit works though I haven't used it myself.


0

This is a very confusing problem. Try this. Make the URL include the location and name of the textfile; here is an example: www.yourwebsiteurl.com/yourtextfile.txt. Using that method, ONLY the textfile, not including HTML, will be read.


0

If this "MY TXT URL" is indeed your TXT file's URL (for example http://www.test.com/file10.txt), then your code will read the TXT file itself, and not any web page (as you say it does). So you're mixing something here. Whatever URL you give to it, that web resource (file) it is going to read.


0

These are not supported steams by the JW Player. We only support the following - http://support.jwplayer.com/customer/portal/articles/1403635-media-format-support


1

StackOverflowException is expected with this code: public readonly Stream Null=new NullStream() because calling NullStream constructor will call Stream constructor(the parent class)which must initialize Null field which then call NullStream().... but hey it's static ! initialization of static fields are done just once and before any object is created, ...


6

Javadoc for reduce: Performs a reduction on the elements of this stream, using an associative accumulation function, Note the word "associative": this is a property your reducing function does not possess. Associativity is key to parallelization: the order of application of operations is not defined, and without associativity the result will not be ...


0

To cut paper use this commands after printing text: oStream.write(0x1D); oStream.write(86); oStream.write(48); oStream.write(0);


2

Each time you wrap an input or output stream (Not to be confused with the Java 8 Stream API) you notionally transform that stream so that when you read it, you deal witht he transformed data rather than the raw data. How exactly higher level stream works? Each stream serves a simple purpose e.g. buffering, compression, encryption. This is not magic , ...


0

Consider an example to explain. Ultimately everything should be passed as bytes. For a programmer It is very hard to deal with the bytes always in his programme. So high level streams comes into picture where you just pass your element and internal work done by low level stream. My program .....>High Level Stream ....> Low level Stream ...


0

The higher level streams are not more efficient just... higher level. They give you a more usable interface for practical tasks. For example instead of reading byte by byte checking for the new line character you simply read a whole line. Underneath the higher level streams call methods of the lower level ones, that's why you have to pass one to them to ...


0

You already answered your first question. We pass lower level stream to the constructor of a higher level stream since the high level stream needs the reference to the lower level stream in order to access the data. As to your second question, high level streams can become more efficient by minimizing the access to the lower level stream they are wrapping. ...


1

With "fake" Bar and Foo that will contains list of "processed" bars it will look like this: case class Bar(s: String) val bar1 = Bar("bar1") val bar2 = Bar("bar2") val bar3 = Bar("bar3") case class Foo(bars: Seq[Bar]) val loop: Stream[Bar] = Stream(bar1, bar2, bar3) #::: loop val init: Foo = new Foo(Nil) def nextFoo(foo: Foo, bar: Bar): ...


0

Stream.of(s.split("//s")).map(URI::new);


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This should be enough: List<URI> uris = Stream.of(string.split("\\s+")).map(URI::create).collect( Collectors.toList()); It will throw an exception if any invalid input is encountered, but I'm of the opinion that errors should be exposed, not quietly suppressed.


1

/Fm1 refers to a named resource. PDF consumers look up the dictionary of named resources attached to the page (or Form XObject or other compound object -- in any event: the object with which the stream is associated). See the PDF 1.7 Reference, page 89, Section 7.8 "Content Streams and Resources".


4

Use String longestName = names.stream().max(Comparator.comparing(String::length)).get(); to compare elements on some property (can be more complex than that, but doesn't have to). As Brian suggests in the comments, using Optional#get() like this is unsafe if there's a possibility that the Stream is empty. You'd be better suited to use one of the safer ...


0

python does not offer builtin encyption, but there are plenty of good packages you can use. The python website recommends pycrypto http://www.pycrypto.org. Here's a sample of how you could use it in your application import boto import gcs_oauth2_boto_plugin import requests from Crypto.Cipher import DES url = 'https://www.example.com/file.tar.gz' r = ...


0

In order to achieve what you want, you can use sys.stdout. It's a file object corresponding to the interpreter’s standard output streams and is used for the output of print. So in the same way you do print >> stream, struct to print to a file, you can just do: print >> sys.stdout, struct to print to stdout. You could also "redirect" ...


1

Elegance is in the eye of the beholder. If you don't mind using a stateful function in groupingBy, you can do this: AtomicInteger counter = new AtomicInteger(); stream.collect(groupingBy(x->counter.getAndIncrement()/chunkSize)) .values() .forEach(database::flushChunk); This doesn't win any performance or memory usage points over your original ...


0

Reduced to the essentials, this is your read loop: public void run() { //... try { in = new DataInputStream(connection.getInputStream()); while (true) { //... try { int len = in.readInt(); byte[] data = new byte[len]; in.readFully(data, 0, len); //... ...



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