New answers tagged

5

What you're asking for, is not what you want. This is a bad idea for many many reasons, but they're outlined here: http://perl.plover.com/varvarname.html What you need for this is a hash, and specifically a slice. It works a bit like this: my @header = qw ( A B C ); my @values = qw ( X Y Z ); my %combined; @combined{@header} = @values; print Dumper \%...


-4

This answers only the question in the headline: I don't recommend this. perl -e 'eval "\$x = q{evil eval}"; print qq(Welcome to your debugging hell: $x\n)'


0

Is this that you want? :-) s := `1 2 3 4 5 6 7` var beyond5 string if strings.Contains(s, "5") { scanner := bufio.NewScanner(strings.NewReader(s)) for scanner.Scan() { beyond5 += scanner.Text() } } beyond5 += "\n" log.Println(beyond5)


1

Assuming that your list is always made of consecutive days, separated by one (or several) nulls, this should do what you're expecting: var input = [ new Date('Thu Jul 21 2016 00:00:00 GMT+0200'), null, new Date('Sat Jul 23 2016 00:00:00 GMT+0200'), null, new Date('Mon Jul 25 2016 00:00:00 GMT+0200'), new Date('Tue Jul 26 2016 00:00:00 ...


1

You're looking for str2double: b = str2double(a); Also have a look at the data types in the doc.


2

Python executes _result = sentence.strip()[:4] as several separate steps: _result = sentence # look up the object "sentence" references _result = _result.strip # attribute lookup on the object found _result = _result() # call the result of the attribute lookup _result = _result[:4] # slice the result of the call stripped1 = _result # ...


0

To create string based of date array <script> var array = []; for (i = 0; i < 10; i++) { var date = new Date(); array.push(date); } </script> <script> arr = ['Thu Jul 21 2016 00:00:00 GMT+0200', null,'Sat Jul 23 2016 00:00:00 GMT+0200', null,'Mon Jul 25 2016 00:00:00 GMT+0200','Tue Jul 26 2016 00:00:00 GMT+...


0

just my 2 cents. The provided Link shows an example how to use String.format in a Java Application. But in Web Application, particularly in JSP using pure Java code in jsp should be avoided. Also there is no need to format string in that way. Just do it like this example shows: <div> <span>Hola ${name}, que tal?</span> </div>


1

Your pointer p points to a string literal and you modify that string when you call strcpy(3). Modifying a string literal is undefined behavior. See This example in documentation.


0

consider using fgets for input and parse integer with sscanf. The size of the source array needs to be included to avoid writing too many characters. A pair of pointers can be used to iterate through the arrays in insertString. #include <stdio.h> #include <string.h> #include <stdlib.h> #define SIZE 256 void insertString(char source[], ...


0

The simplest approach is to check whether or not the number is odd. If it is, by definition, its right-most binary number will be "1" (2^0). After we've determined this, we bit shift the number to the right and check the same value using recursion. @Test public void shouldPrintBinary() { StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(); convert(1234, sb); } ...


0

Just add an escape sequence with a \r\n instead of + in your string. See also : https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/h21280bw.aspx "It was the best of times, it was the worst of times,\r\n it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness,\r\n it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity,\r\n it was the season of Light, it was ...


0

Try using the grep v or --invert-match tags: find ./* -name "kittens.xml" -type f\! -exec grep -L -v "<claws>18</claws>" {} \;| xargs rm -fv You can find more about grep invert by using this in terminal: grep --help | grep invert


1

You can either apply a regular expression or simply use indexOf() and lastIndexOf() to extract the quoted text: List<String> lines = new ArrayList<>(); lines.add("1 - <how_subject> \"Please forgive me\""); lines.add("2 - <who> \"Princess Peach\""); lines.add("3 - <what> \"gave me a hickey.\""); List<String> quotedText = ...


2

Include your parse inside a try catch block for(String element:container){ try { int num = Integer.parseInt(element); sum += num; catch (NumberFormatException nfe){ System.out.println ("Element " + element + " in the array is not an integer"); } }


-1

you need to handle that exception: class Array{ String container = {"Joe","12","Chandler","15","67","Rajat",'a'}; int sum; for(String element:container){ try { int num = Integer.parseInt(element); catch(Exception e) { continue; } sum += num; } void print(){ System.out.print(sum); } } class ArrayDemo{ public static void ...


1

I dont know, how to do that this would work with comma, but this code If(isset($_POST['test'])) { //test is my textarea name $total = 0; $ex = explode(' ',$_POST['test']); function total ($ex) { global $total; return $total+=$ex; } array_map('total',$ex); echo $total; } Worked well, when you write normal integer ...


0

To add to all the answers. Since C# 6.0 there is the nameof keyword. string name = nameof(MyNamespace); This has several advantages: The name is resolved at compile-time The name will change when refactoring the namespace It is syntax checked, so the name must exist cleaner code


1

You can try like this if you want to get the string inside brackets <> String str = "1 - <how_subject> \"Please forgive me\"2 - <who> \"Princess Peach\"3 - <what> \"gave me a hickey.\""; Pattern p = Pattern.compile("\\<(.*?)\\>"); Matcher m = p.matcher(str); while(m.find()) { System.out.println(m.group(1)); } IDEONE ...


1

With a little regular expression $s = "xxx = 230.5 bbb = 490.3 ccc = 3.948"; preg_match_all('/[,\.\d]+/', $s, $match); print_r($match); exit; Result Array ( [0] => Array ( [0] => 230.5 [1] => 490.3 [2] => 3.948 ) ) Please regard: if you use comma and dot, you'll have to prepare the values for a valid ...


0

Calendar calendar = Calendar.getInstance(); Date now = calendar.getTime(); String timestamp = simpleDateFormat.format(now); These might come in handy SimpleDateFormat simpleDateFormat = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd'T'HH:mm:ss.SSSSSSZZZZZ"); this format is equal to --> "2016-01-01T09:30:00.000000+01:00" SimpleDateFormat simpleDateFormat = ...


0

this is the example of Python Print String To Text File def my_func(): """ this function return some value :return: """ return 25.256 def write_file(data): """ this function write data to file :param data: :return: """ file_name = r'D:\log.txt' with open(file_name, 'wb') as x_file: x_file.write('{} ...


2

The way to do this is to use a SecureString. It is a bit more awkward to use than a normal string but it is the exact thing you need for this scenario. Here is the docs to it: https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.security.securestring(v=vs.110).aspx and some more information here about it: Is SecureString ever practical in a C# application?


2

A considerably less verbose solution: try (BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new FileReader(myFile))) { StringBuilder retVal = new StringBuilder(); while ((line = br.readLine()) != null) { retVal.append(line).append(System.lineSeparator()); } return retVal.toString(); }


-2

to avoid any confusion, it's preferable to use mysqli_real_escape_string() than to escape the string manually. mysqli_real_escape_string() function takes care of the escaping itself. according to php.net: "This function is used to create a legal SQL string that you can use in an SQL statement. The given string is encoded to an escaped SQL string, taking ...


0

To make sure that your code does not throw NumberFormatException or even NullPointerException, when you get number from user, use apache common classes: import org.apache.commons.lang3.StringUtils; import org.apache.commons.lang3.math.NumberUtils; ..... // '1' is the default value which is returned when the string can not be converted to int // The ...


-2

Currently, it is evaluating to True because the variable has a value. There is a good example found here of what happens when you evaluate arbitrary types as a boolean. In short, what you want to do is isolate the 'True' or 'False' string and run eval on it. >>> eval('True') True >>> eval('False') False


1

Provide the second dimension length in a 2-D array in C always. First dimension length is optional if you are declaring a 2-D array.


3

We need to specify the column size mandatory when passing a 2D array as a parameter. So, You should declare your function like this: void print_str(char str[][MAX_STR_LEN],int count);


1

Use void print_str(char str[][MAX_STR_LEN], int count);


0

Overloaded, but easy to read, oneliner... /** * Convert underscore_strings to camelCase. * * @param {string} $str */ function underscoreToCamel ($str) { // Remove underscores, capitalize words, squash, lowercase first. lcfirst(str_replace(' ', '', ucwords(str_replace('_', ' ', $str)))); }


0

As mentioned Apache Commons NumberUtils can do it. Which return 0 if it cannot convert string to int. You can also define your own default value. NumberUtils.toInt(String str, int defaultValue) example: NumberUtils.toInt("3244", 1) = 3244 NumberUtils.toInt("", 1) = 1 NumberUtils.toInt(null, 5) = 5 NumberUtils.toInt("Hi", 6) = 6 NumberUtils.toInt(...


2

You could loop over the results of readLine() and accumulate them until you get a null, indicating the end of the file (BTW, note that your snippet neglected to close the reader. A try-with-resource structure could handle that): try (BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new FileReader(myFile))) { String line = br.readLine(); if (line == null) { ...


0

Sometimes there are small differences between strings that can't easily be seen in the console. Try this: print('SwitchPort: {!r}'.format(switchPort)) print('line: {!r}'.format(line)) It will likely make the difference easier to spot. Per discussion above, the actual issue here was a trailing space. The fix is to change: switchPort.strip() to ...


0

VARIABLES INSIDE A LOOP GO OUT OF SCOPE afterwards! Here is the fixed code for the case you are mentioning (make sure you test for more cases and debug if needed): #include <stdio.h> #include <string.h> // UNNEEDED int compare(char *,char*[],int); int compare(char *s, char tab[10000][100], int i) { int j = 0; for (; j < i; j++) {...


0

The basic problem is that scanf("%[^\n]",... reads up to but NOT including the newline. So the newline is still waiting on the input for a later scanf call to read. That means the second call won't read anything (the next character is still a newline, so it stops immediately with failure.) So you need to read and discard the newline. scanf("%*c"); or ...


0

My bet is that there are either whitespace or invisible characters in the string so that when you print it looks like they are the same string but they are not, actually, the same. Try to trim out any whitespace from the string you are comparing to and see what it returns: String trimmed = str.trim(); System.out.println(trimmed); System.out.println(trimmed....


0

"" is the gap in-between each letter of Hello,this,is,my,string! So when the string is split by , and ! the result is Hello, this, is, my, string, "". The "" being the empty character between the end of the string and !. If you replaced "" with a visible character (say #) your string would look like this #H#e#l#l#o#,#t#h#i#s#,#i#s#,#m#y#,#s#t#r#i#n#g#!#.


3

Empty strings are the 0 of strings. There are literally infinity of them everywhere. It's only natural that "ABC" is equivalent to "ABC" + "" or ABC + "" + "" + "". Just like it's natural that 3 is equivalent to 3 + 0 or 3 + 0 + 0 + 0. and the fact that you have an empty string after "Hello,this,is,my,string!".Split('!')" does mean something. It means ...


4

This is happening because you are using StringSplitOptions.None while one of your delimiter values occurs at the end of the string. The entire purpose of that option is to create the behavior you are observing: it splits a string containing N delimiters into exactly N + 1 pieces. To see the behavior you want, use StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries: var ...


1

String externalization means, instead of writing: console.log("Hello, world"); you load the string from an external source, like a text file or a database. The code then looks like this: console.log(gettext("Hello, world")); The gettext function then does the whole work of loading the externalized string. This is one of the ingredients for translating ...


3

Assuming you have an object with the replacing to do, you can use Array.map var replace = { 'cat': 'tiger', 'dog': 'wolf', 'cow': 'diary', }; var starter = ["cat", "dog", "cow"]; var final = starter.map(value => replace[value] || value); console.log(final) If the string is not in the replace object, replace[value] is ...


1

function transform(str){ //logic to transform goes here } var massaged = myArr.map(transform); Maybe thats what youre asking for? map reference here : https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Array/map


1

You can just split your string at the / characters and grab the second element of the resulting list (the first one is empty because of the leading /) board = url.split('/')[1] You could also use regular expressions if you wanted. import re board = re.search('(?<=^\/).*?(?=\/)', url).group()


0

The Concurrent writes error happens when the Go runtime detects concurrent writes to the map by different goroutines. It is a feature added in go1.6: https://blog.golang.org/go1.6 The runtime has added lightweight, best-effort detection of concurrent misuse of maps. As always, if one goroutine is writing to a map, no other goroutine should be reading ...


-1

I am not quite sure of what you want to do. You want to re-write strlen to make your code compatible with standard c-Library, or you want to manage strings. In the first case, I think you'd better directly use the standard libraries. The other case is interesting : you should take a look at the c++ string class, that have an implementation of the traits ...


0

If you want to modify the initial object - it would be enough to use Object.keys and Array.forEach functions: var obj = { "page": [ "POST", "DELETE" ], "news": [ "PUT" ] }; Object.keys(obj).forEach(function(k) { obj[k] = obj[k].join(","); }); console.log(JSON.stringify(obj, 0, 4));


0

You may do like this; var o = { "page": [ "POST", "DELETE" ], "news": [ "PUT" ] }, p = Object.keys(o).reduce((p,k) => (p[k] = o[k]+"",p),{}); console.log(p);


0

Plenty of ways to do it. Just need to loop over the object and set the array to a string. var obj = { "page": [ "POST", "DELETE" ], "news": [ "PUT" ] }; Object.keys(obj).reduce( function (o, key) { o[key] = o[key].join(", "); return o; }, obj); console.log(obj); Probably would make sense to use ...



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