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1

Modern JVM's optimize string concatenation for you. I wouldn't bother trying to out smart it unless you're doing something really painful. I can't tell if you are since you didn't post you're actual code. Here's little bit of help indentString = new String(new char[indentCount]).replace("\0", "|"); that I stole from here


1

Try also x:match(".-}{(.-)}"), which is simpler.


0

Sounds like you are trying to get a list of floats together from a text file. You can use a dict to map the index you mention to the list of floats. Then just open the file, read line by line, use split(',') to split the string into a list of strings. Then grab the first integer as you index, use list slice to look the rest of the strings and ...


2

You can simply do as follows: valid_options = ['Small', 'Medium' , 'Large' ] while True: car_type = input('The car type: ') # input is already str. Any value entered is a string. So no error is going to be raised. if car_type in valid_options: break else: print('Not a valid option. Valid options are: ', ",".join(valid_options)) ...


1

input always returns a str, so str(input()) never raises a ValueError. You're confusing a string with a word. A string is just a series of characters. For example "123hj -fs9f032@RE#@FHE8" is a perfectly valid sequence of characters, and thus a perfectly valid string. However it is clearly not a word. Now, if a user types in "1234", Python won't try to ...


2

This is where pattern matching is useful: local x = "{abc}{def}{ghi}" local result = x:match(".-{.-}.-{(.-)}") print(result) .- matches zero or more characters, non-greedy. The whole pattern .-{.-}.-{(.-)} captures what's between the second { and the second }.


1

As Fred-ii mentioned, you can wrap your output in <pre></pre> tags. HTML by default ignores any spaces past the first in output. See this for more information. An alternative could also be replacing all spaces with &nbsp; which will force all the spaces to render out on the page.


2

string ss = ""; ss[0] = '1'; ss[1] = '2'; cout << ss << "." << ss[0] << "." << ss[1] << "." << endl; This looks like undefined behavior. Perhaps you should use at to trigger the out_of_range exception :) string ss = ""; ss.at(0) = '1'; ss.at(1) = '2'; cout << ss << "." << ss[0] << "." ...


0

to find the last occurrence of a character in a string in C. use the strrchr() function. that function prototype is found in the system header file: string.h


2

With == you compare whether two objects are the same, not whether their value is. You want to compare their values, so you need to use .equals(): if (username.equals(user_1)) { System.out.print("True"); } else { System.out.print("False"); } It's like comparing two red identical looking car, they are identical but not the same thing. In java two ...


0

You can't compare Strings in java using == You should use the String class methods username.equals(user_1);


2

NEVER compare objects (and String is am object) with ==, use equals() method


0

You can't change in a string constant, you must copy to a new char string. #include <iostream> #include <cstring> void delete_end(char* dest, const char* source) { const char* p = source + strlen(source) - 1; while(*p != '/' && p > source) --p; strncpy(dest, source, p - source); dest[p-source] = '\0'; } int ...


1

yeschar *lastslash; if (lastslash = strrchr(myStr, '/')) *lastslash = '\0'; // the code still crashes here. return; } int main ( void ) { char foo[]= "/one/two/three/two"; deleteEnd(foo); printf ("%s\n", foo);


1

The reason is a trivial typo in this loop: for(int k=0;k<contacts.size();k++) { if(temp_first==contacts[i].first_name&&temp_last==contacts[i].last_name) contacts[i].phone_number=new_phone; } It should be contacts[k] and not contacts[i]. You have the same typo in the for(int p... loop. In addition, that loop condition should be p < ...


1

Since you said you dont want to use some kind of data structure i think that you can do something like this, but it is not performant. I usually prefer to store index rather than values. ArrayList<String> words = new ArrayList(); int[] occurrence = new int[2000]; Arrays.sort(data); int nwords = 0; occurrence[nwords]=1; words.add(data[0]); ...


0

Just declare foo as an array of chars, instead of a pointer to a char: #include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> #include <string.h> void deleteEnd (char* myStr){ char *lastslash; if (lastslash = strrchr(myStr, '/')) *lastslash = '\0'; // the code still crashes here. return; } int main ( void ) { char foo[]= ...


0

You could try something simple like this.. int count = 0; for( int i = 0; i < words.size(); i++ ){ System.out.printf("%s: ", words.get( i )); for( int j = 0; j < words.size(); j++ ) { if( words.get( i ).equals( words.get( j ) ) ) count++; } System.out.printf( "%d\n", ...


2

In C, When you write literal strings like this: char* foo= "/one/two/three/two"; Those are immutable, which means they are embedded in the executable and are read only. You get an access violation (crash) when trying to modify read only data. Instead you can declare your string as an array of chars instead of a literal string. #include <stdio.h> ...


0

Start at the first character. Scan the current character, is it /? No? Go to step 3. Yes? Go to step 4. Is there another character? No? Go to step 5. Yes? Go to the next character and go to step 2. Set a "lastSlash" variable to current character position. Go to step 2. Delete everything after lastSlash's position. You're done!


1

If you cannot use Guava's Multiset, then you can implement an equivalent yourself. Basically, you just need to create a Map<String, Integer>, which keeps track of counts (value) per each word (key). This means changing this ArrayList<String> words = new ArrayList<String>(); // ... for (int i = 0; i < data.length; i ++ ) { ...


1

It looks like you're trying to parse URLs. PHP has functions for that, of course, albeit slightly weird functions, but it's PHP, so we expect that: $url = '.. your massive URL inception ..'; $_url = parse_url($url); print_r($_url); parse_str($_url['query'], $query); print_r($query); $_url = parse_url($query['picture']); print_r($_url); $picture = ...


0

Another method. Since this is a URL, first split on the question mark ? and take the second element, the query string. Now split on the ampersands & and loop through them looking for the key/value pair starting with "picture=". Once that is found grab the portion of the element after that many characters (8 characters in "picture="), then split the ...


0

You should initialize the String resultat. The final code would look like: import java.util.Scanner; import java.util.ArrayList; public class Laggaihop { private static Scanner scanner = new Scanner( System.in ); public static void main(String[] args) { System.out.print("Ange antal ord: "); String input = scanner.nextLine(); ...


2

Something like this might work. I believe you want to parse the picture URL, yes? <?php function scrub($string) { // Parse the picture variable. $matches = array(); $result = preg_match("/picture=([^\&]+)/", $string, $matches); $url = $matches[1]; // Scrub the picture URL. $result = ...


-1

You should do something like this: <?php echo '<input type="text" id="img" name="img" size="70" value="'.$whatyouwant.'"'; ?> Hope it helps!


1

String resultat; resultat=resultat+something; ^what is value in here? Or String resultat; //declared resultat="something";//initialized


1

All local variables need to be initalised before being used. Doing so will solve the compilation error. In your program you have declared the variable resultat but have not initialised it. Section 4.12.5 in Java 8 Language Specification states: A local variable (§14.4, §14.14) must be explicitly given a value before it is used, by either initialization ...


3

No you have declared the variable. Initializing means you have given it an initial value. You can do this by replacing the line with: String resultat = ""; Or you can do it in two separate steps: String resultat; //declaration resultat = ""; //initializiation As far as I know, Java only initializes fields automatically. For local variables, it does ...


1

For C++11 the closest draft standard would be N3337 but in this case it still has a return type of iterator so the issue is the same. The link that Praetorian provides in his comment does not seem to have the same information that it did which is unfortunate and I can not find a specific bug report for this case but in a related case where libstdc++ and ...


0

If I understand your question correctly, you want to implement a recursive function where find(text, substring), given two strings, returns the same result as the simple Python expression substring in text. A recursive breakdown of this problem would be: Does text begin with substring? If so, return True. (Base case 1) Is text empty? If so, return False. ...


0

Just for fun, here is another solution using streams, prepared for more than two turtles to be shown side-by-side: public static void main(String[] args) { String turtle1 = " _\r\n .-./*)\r\n _/___\\/\r\n U U\r"; String turtle2 = " _\r\n .-./*)\r\n _/___\\/\r\n U U\r"; // split lines into fragments ...


0

You can't just use PHP's binary string functions on a HTML string and then expect things to work. $string = "<p><b>Lorem Ipsum</b> is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry.</p>"; First of all you need to formulate what kind of excerpt you'd like to create in the HTML context. Let's take an example that is ...


2

#include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> #include <string.h> char** readFile(const char *fileName); int main(int argc, char **argv){ char **data = readFile(argv[1]); int i; for(i=0; data[i] ; ++i){ puts(data[i]); free(data[i]); } free(data); return 0; } char** readFile(const char *fileName){ FILE ...


0

I'm here too ;) public class Test { static String turtle1 = " _\r\n .-./*)\r\n _/___\\/\r\n U U\r".replace("\r", ""); static String turtle2 = " _\r\n .-./*)\r\n _/___\\/\r\n U U\r".replace("\r", ""); public static int countRows(String string){ return string.length() - string.replace("\n", "").length() ...


0

There are much simpler ways to do this. For example, you can loop over the indices of the string and check if the substring is at that location, as mentioned here: [i for i in range(len(string)) if s.startswith(substr,i)] This will evaluate to a list of indices of all of the occurrences of substr in string.


0

You need a base case for your recursive function that will eventually return without recursing. Your base case len(text)==0 is never executed unless text=='' the first time through.


1

This code will reverse all string elements of a vector<string> #include <string> #include <algorithm> void main() { vector<string> a = { "abc", "pqr", "xyz" }; for (auto& s : a) { reverse(begin(s), end(s)); } }


0

fgets() is only reading one Line by each call, and sets the file courser to the next line. If you want to read the fully file, you have to iterate it. To check if you are at the end, you can check for the EOF flag with feof(). Resulting in, for me working: char* readFile(const char *fileName) { FILE *inFile; inFile=fopen(fileName, "r"); char ...


1

After seeing how simple the answer really is, thanks to @Bill Lynch , my solution may be too complex! Anyways, its a simple counting-difference. #include <iostream> #include <algorithm> #include <array> int main() { std::array<int,26> str1 = {}; std::array<int,26> str2 = {}; std::string s1("abce"); std::string ...


1

A simple method is to make a substring having the correct start and then get the desired part: $initialString = "Status: Ativo Identificador: F37CE5 Meio de Pagamento: Cartão de crédito Data de contratação: 25/03/2015 Data de expiração: 25/03/2017"; $substring = substr($initialString, strpos($initialString, "Identificador:") + 14); $substring = ...


0

Not so pretty but works: String turtle1 = " _\r\n .-./*)\r\n _/___\\/\r\n U U\r\n"; String turtle2 = " _\r\n .-./*)\r\n _/___\\/\r\n U U\r\n"; String[] turtle1Lines = turtle1.split("\r\n"); String[] turtle2Lines = turtle2.split("\r\n"); StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(); int turtle1Width = 0; for (int i = 0; i < ...


2

I was originally thinking that you needed a fairly complicated algorithm, like Smith-Waterman for example. But the restrictions on your input makes it fairly easy to implement this in O(m + n), where m is the length of the first string, and n is the length of the second string. We can use a builtin algorithm to calculate the number of characters that are ...


0

you can achieve O(n) using dynamic programming. i.e. use an integer d for storing difference. Algo: move from lower index to higher index of both array. if a[i] not equal b[j]: increase d by 2 move the index of smaller array and check again. if a[i] is equal to b[j] : decrease d by 1 move both index repeat this ...


1

See my example below, should be self explaining. public class Turtle { private static final String returnpattern = "\r\n"; public static void main(String[] args) { // the data to run through String turtle1 = " _\r\n .-./*)\r\n _/___\\/\r\n U U\r\n"; String turtle2 = " _\r\n .-./*)\r\n ...


1

This is an example, you can use in your case this: $content = file_get_contents('bookmarks.html'); Run this: <?php $content = '<html> <title>Random Website I am Crawling</title> <body> Click <a href="http://clicklink.com">here</a> for foobar Another site is http://foobar.com </body> </html>'; ...


1

Use regular expression. Something like: <?php $pattern = '/Identificador: (\w+)/'; preg_match($pattern, $initialString, $matches); print_r($matches[1]); ?> $matches[1] will contain the string you are looking for.


-1

O(2n) and O(n) are exactly the same thing, since the "O" indicates the asymptotic behavior for the cost of your method. Update: I just noticed you meant O(n^2) with your O(N2). If you need to do that comparison, you'll always have O(n^2) as your cost, since you have to: 1) Loop for every character of your words, and this is O(n) 2) Compare the current ...


0

You can use a regex to capture the group: preg_match("/Identificador\s*:\s*(\w+)/",$initialString,$matches); the result is then stored in $matches[1], or the array is empty if no match is found.


0

All the other answers suggest explode and splitting lines, this is generally really slow. You should use strpos and loop through the results. In my tests (looped 10,000 times) it took my code only 0.249 seconds on a very large test string. Under the same conditions the other code posted on this page took 0.811 seconds to do the same task. <?php $pos ...



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