New answers tagged

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Here you go : Sample data: [zatcsv]$ cat foo.txt TOK UPDATE DATE SHOT TIME AUXHEAT PHASE STATE PGASA PGASZ BGASA BGASZ BGASA2 BGASZ2 PIMPA PIMPZ PELLET RGEO RMAG AMIN SEPLIM XPLIM KAPPA DELTA INDENT AREA VOL CONFIG IGRADB WALMAT DIVMAT LIMMAT EVAP BT IP VSURF Q95 BEPMHD BETMHD BEPDIA NEL DNELDT ZEFF PRAD POHM ENBI PINJ BSOURCE PINJ2 BSOURCE2 COCTR PNBI ...


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This is the code that I could write..... #include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> #include <string.h> #include <time.h> #define TAILLE_MAX 200 typedef enum operatore { plus, diff, prod, dive, notope }operatore; void SystemPause(); char* allocStr(); void initStr(char* str); void delet_space(char* str); ...


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Do you need help on generic program structure or do you need advice on how to approach the problem? What have you managed so far and what is not working for you?


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DISCLAIMER: @AlexD - has the correct way to validate a date. You cannot do the same with a Regex because calculations are required for leap years. However, quoted from the original question: Most of the ways I have seen on SO have involved validating a C# date object which is not what I want to do. Since the question is also tagged regex, here are ...


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Literal strings are automatically interned by most Javascript compilers. So var a = 'hello' and var b = 'hello' will likely already be pointing at the same copy of the 'hello' string in memory, no need for further optimization on your part. The only way to make sure different string objects are created for the same string value is by defining each one via ...


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This is one of the difficulties in using strtok. It has internal state in the routine, which keeps track of the position in the string that was passed in originally (i.e. the first strtok(string, symbol); call). This information gets messed up when you call strtok inside the functionX as it changes the internal pointer. Then when you return you're using ...


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The easiest approach would be something like this private static boolean findSfollowedByT(String string) { if (!string.contains("t") && !string.contains("s")) return true; if (string.contains("s") && string.indexOf("s") < string.lastIndexOf("t")) return true; else return false; } or a more compact ...


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Try var stringToValidate = "1999-02-23"; DateTime dt; bool ok = DateTime.TryParseExact( stringToValidate, "yyyy-MM-dd", CultureInfo.InvariantCulture, DateTimeStyles.None, out dt );


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String: let origin = "Some string with\u{00a0}whitespaces" // \u{00a0} is a no-break space Oneliner: let result = origin.characters.contains { " \u{00a0}".characters.contains($0) } Another approach: let spaces = NSCharacterSet.whitespaceCharacterSet() let result = origin.utf16.contains { spaces.characterIsMember($0) } Output: print(result) // ...


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Found this interesting, so made a code snippet that might be useful for you. Assuming that every byte is allowed to have a small difference. Like in your comment that FF D9 EE 00 would be acceptable if the control value was FF D8 EE 00, then also FE D9 EF 01 would be acceptable. In the example I have set 2 as the acceptable range, meaning it will allow a ...


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The following code works for me. Note that it's easier to just iterate over the characters in a string using 'for' (second example below): var s = "X yz" for var i = 0; i < s.characters.count; i++ { let x = s[s.startIndex.advancedBy(i)] print(x) print(String(x) == " ") } for c in s.characters { print(c) print(String(c) == " ") }


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Use the next pattern which has been established with std::swap: For all your user types define a non-member to_string function in the same namespace where the user type itself is defined. This function may call the member toString : std::string to_string(const UserType& x) { return x.toString(); } Then in your function call to_string like this: ...


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This version should be linear in length of the string, and should be fine as long as the sequences aren't too repetitive (in which case you can replace the recursion with a while loop). def find_all(st, substr, start_pos=0, accum=[]): ix = st.find(substr, start_pos) if ix == -1: return accum return find_all(st, substr, start_pos=ix + 1, ...


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This is a nice exercise to try doing yourself. Here is how you can do it: Find the index indOfLess of the '<' character Starting at indOfLess+1, look for the index of '>' character If both indexes are above zero, you have a <...> substring; otherwise, there is no such substring. Finding an index is done using s.IndexOf('<') or ...


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Facts: You know it must be at least 3 characters You know it must start with a < You know it must end with a > These map pretty easily to C# string operations. In something this simple, I'd personally stick to built-in string methods and avoid regular expressions. bool matches = (str.Length > 2 && str.StartsWith("<") && ...


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You could use Regex for this, it would probably be a good choice, something like this: if (Regex.IsMatch(yourString, @"<(.*?)>")) //string contains < > and some characters between them, now do something The advantage of using Regex is if your string contains some characters before or after the <> it will still find a match. If you ...


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if (str.Length > 2 && str.Substring(0,1) == "<" && str.Substring(str.Length - 1, 1) == ">") return true; Here's what that might look like in a C# program: class Program { static void Main(string[] args) { Console.WriteLine("\r\n<12345> = " + isValidTag("<12345>").ToString()); ...


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You can also use string replace $foo = str_replace('\n', "\n", $foo);


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You can use eval: $foo = 'hey\nman'; eval ('$b = "' . $foo . '";'); var_dump($b);


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lines = File.open("textfile.txt").read.split("\n") hsh = {} lines.each do |line| next if line == "" hsh[line[0..2]] = line[3..-1] end using your method of slowly nibbling at the file f = File.open("textfile.txt") hsh = {} loop do x = f.gets break unless x hsh[x[0..2]] = x[3..-1] end


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the 2nd parameter of slice is the length, not the end-index, so change: part1 = lineString.slice(0, 2) to: part1 = lineString.slice(0, 3) If passed a start index and a length, returns a substring containing length characters starting at the index Also you don't need the second parameter here (this is not a bug though): part2 = ...


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A simple solution: dim str as string = "" for each item as string in lst str += ("," & item) next return str.substring(1) It takes off the first char from the string (",")


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Explode & implode - initial string remains intact, dynamic memory allocation #include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> #include <string.h> #include <errno.h> typedef struct { uintptr_t ptr; int size; } token_t; int explode(char *str, int slen, const char *delimiter, token_t **tokens) { int i = 0, c1 = 0, c2 = ...


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Typo: String^ strCharName = openCharDialog1->InitialDirectory + openCharDialog1->FileName; ^


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In C# I would just use the IComparer Interface and leave it to Array.Sort void Main() { // we defin the IComparer class to define Sort Order var sortOrder = new SortOrder("dfbcae"); var testOrder = "abcdeeabc".ToCharArray(); // sort the array using Array.Sort Array.Sort(testOrder, sortOrder); Console.WriteLine(testOrder.ToString()); } ...


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You have a bug here: word[len2 + 1] = grid[posX + nextX][posY + nextY]; //grid[x][y] represents a word[len2 + 2] = '\0'; It should be: word[len2] = grid[posX + nextX][posY + nextY]; //grid[x][y] represents a word[len2 + 1] = '\0'; Remember that the index begin with 0


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You seem to have come up with a formula; now you need a way to dispense it. Your worksheet design does not lend itself to simply filling down a formula. However, with the numbers in column C identifying valid entries that require a formula in columns D and E, a short sub procedure can make quick work of putting the formulas into the correct places. Sub ...


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scala> val towns = List( | List(21, "Georgetown", "Male"), | List(29, "Medford", "Male"), | List(18, "Manchester", "Male"), | List(27, "Georgetown", "Female")) towns: List[List[Any]] = ... scala> towns.map({ case List(a, b, c) => (b,c) }).groupBy(_._1).mapValues(_.length).maxBy(_._2) res0: (Any, Int) = ...


2

This is a pretty weird structure, but a way to do it would be with: val items : List[List[Any]] = List( List(List(21, "Georgetown", "Male")), List(List(29, "Medford", "Male")), List(List(18, "Manchester", "Male")), List(List(27, "Georgetown", "Female"))).map(_.flatten) val results = items.foldLeft(Map[String,Int]()) { (acc,item) ...


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In the workbook you have attached, VLOOKUP will return #N/A when there is no available value. In Sheet ogle_aksam_gramaj Cell D4 use the following Formula: =SUMIF($I:$I,$A4,$J:$J) You can then drag it down and it should be giving you the prices based on the details provided in the same sheet (Range I:J) The good thing (or bad, depends on you) of sum if ...


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If you have a string 'ding' and you are searching for 'do', str.find() will return -1. 'ding'[:-1] is equal to 'din' and 'ding'[-1 + len(sub):] equals 'ding'[1:] which is equal to 'ing'. Putting the two together results in 'dining'. To get the right answer, try something like this: def remove(string, sub): index = string.find(sub) if index == -1: ...


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string = 'ding' string[:-1] >>> 'din' Using a negative number as an index in python returns the nth element from the right-hand side. Accordingly, a slice with :-1 return all but the last element of the string.


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int isalnumstr(const char *str) { int i; for (i = 0; str[i]; ++i) if (isalnum(str[i]) return 1; return 0; } Caller code: if (isalnumstr(s)) /* Contains alpha numeric */ else /* Doesn't contain alpha numeric */


1

rand() is not a good option, and for PHP 7 there is a better option. See below: $family = array("Amit", "Suresh", "Vinit", "Somesh", "Sagar", "Shriram"); if(version_compare(PHP_VERSION,'7.0.0', '<') ) { // for PHP < 7 $rand_name = $family[mt_rand(0, count($family) - 1)]; } else { // for PHP >= 7 $rand_name = $family[random_int(0, ...


0

You have an infinite loop there. while((dest[i]=src[i])!='\0'||src[i]=='.'); // This is the end of the loop, // with an empty statement. Also, you need to change the conditional a little bit. (dest[i]=src[i]) != '\0' && src[i] != '.' To avoid the empty statement problem after while and if ...


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there are so many ways to do it best one is - if you are using a sequencer, you can use command activity to get date from linux and pass the generated value as a parameter to job Thanks Atul Singh


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Have you considered using python's str.format() instead? template = """ side {{ "id" "8" "plane" "({x6} {y6} {z6}) ({x5} {y5} {z5}) ({x4} {y4} {z4})" "material" "DEV/DEV_BLENDMEASURE" "uaxis" "[1 0 0 0] 0.25" "vaxis" "[0 -1 0 0] 0.25" "rotation" "0" "lightmapscale" "16" ...


1

You probably aren't changing the media volume on your device. To verify go to Settings->Sound & Notification and try changing the Media volume found there. You probably also want to update update your previousVolume after a change too: @Override public void onChange(boolean selfChange) { super.onChange(selfChange); AudioManager audio = ...


0

Firstly you have to write the switch sentence properly, because you are calling all the functions of your switch cases ... If you want to do more than 1 option you have to put the switch statement inside a loop like for, while, do-while. For example, this is the way that i would do it whit a while loop: while(m!=11) { switch(m) { case 1 : ...


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You should use break statement after each case to prevent execution falling through to the next case. switch(m){ case 1 : leer_ingrediente(ing); break; case 2 : escribir_ingrediente(ing); break; case 3 : leer_pedido(ped,ok); break; case 4 : insertar_pedido(p, ped, ok); break; case 5 : escribir_pedido(ped); break; case 6 : escribir_pedidos(p); ...


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str.replace() return the result: result = values.replace(…) (and do not modify values)


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Replace return the new value, then you should do: values = values.replace('x1 ',str(x1)) ... Keep in mind that in python strings are immutable.


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Use a StringBuilder. public static void main(String[] args) { StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(); sb.append("Some thing"); System.out.println(sb.toString()); sb.append("Some other thing"); System.out.println(sb.toString()); for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) { sb.append("Thing " + i ); } ...


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try this: char[] ch = str.toCharArray() where str is your string. For future reference or answers to Java-related questions like this, try checking out https://docs.oracle.com/javase/8/docs/api/


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public static void main (String [] args) { String cleaned = "abcXabcXabc"; char remove= 'X'; int loc = cleaned.indexOf(remove); int currentPos = 0; String result = ""; System.out.println ("before: "+ cleaned); while (loc != -1) { result = result + cleaned.substring(currentPos,loc); currentPos = ...


1

The problem was that you were never updating loc. public static void main(String[] args) { String cleaned = "abcXabcXabc"; char remove = 'X'; int loc; while ((loc = cleaned.indexOf(remove)) != 1) { String part1 = cleaned.substring(0, loc); String part2 = cleaned.substring(loc + 1); cleaned = part1 + part2; } ...


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String[] split = argString.split("\\|"); You can then do for(String s : split){ System.out.println(s); }


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StringBuffer is only thread safe if you call one and only one method. SimpleDateFormat uses StringBuffer but is not thread safe (and it was written by the JVM developers). It is not easy to use StringBuffer in a thread safe manner and get it right. You are better of using StringBuilder which replaced StringBuffer ten years ago and use explicit synchronized ...


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In Java, a String[] is not a String (however, calling String[int] yields a String). But, pipe is a special regex character. You need to escape it in in your split. Like, String[] splitArgs = arg.split("\\|");


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StringBuffer is synchronized that means that all its methods are syncrhonized, so it can be safely used in multithreaded environment, i.e. several threads can change and retrieve content of StringBuffer instance safely. The price of this ability is that when 2 threads access the StringBuffer instance at the same time the second thread is blocked until the ...



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