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3

Now that the question is re-opened, I transfer my answer here. The short answer to "Why do they not just compare only lowercase instead of both upper and lower case, if it matches more cases than uppercase?": It does not match more character pairs, it merely matches different pairs. Comparing only uppercase is not enough, e.g. the ASCII letter "I" and the ...


0

You are checking for a character one too many times. Use the following condition: while(increment<=customInput.length()-1) instead of: while(increment<=customInput.length()) Edit: the reason you are not getting the error on "hello world" is because it fails before reaching that extra char, thus not throwing an exception.


2

Your split is not working, and not splitting the String. Therefore Double.parseDouble is parsing the whole input. Try the following: String line = "12.2 Andrew"; String[] data = line.split("(?<=\\d)(?=[a-zA-Z])"); System.out.println(Arrays.toString(data)); // System.out.println(Double.valueOf(data[0])); // fixed data = ...


2

If you print content of data[0] you will notice that it still contains 12.2 Andrew so you actually didn't split anything. That is because your regex says: split on place which has digit before and letter after it which for data like 123foo345bar 123 baz effectively can only split in places marked with | 123|foo345|bar 123 baz ^it ...


5

Did you look at your data variable? It didn't split anything at all, since the condition never matches. You are looking for a place in the input immediately after a number and before a letter, and since there is a space in between this doesn't exist. Try adding a space in the middle, that should fix it: String[] data = line.split("(?<=\\d) ...


0

> function tt(s) >> local t={} >> for p in s:gmatch("..?.?") do >> t[#t+1]=p >> end >> >> for i,v in ipairs(t) do >> print(i, v) >> end >> end > tt("0123") 1 012 2 3 > tt("0123456789") 1 012 2 345 3 678 4 9 > ...


1

For a generic "repeating pattern" solution, you might combine itertools.compress and itertools.cycle: >>> s='abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz0123456789' # 123456789012345678901234567890123456 # * ** ** ** * # 100000001 # <pattern><--------- cycle----------> >>> it=itertools.compress(s, ...


0

Use Json. the ast library consumes a lot of memory and and slower. I have a process that needs to read a text file of 156Mb. Ast with 5 minutes delay for the conversion dictionary Json and 1 minutes using 60% less memory!


2

To split a string into 4, you can get the size like this: local str = "0123456789" local sz = math.ceil(str:len() / 4) Then the first string is str:sub(1, sz), I'll leave the rest to you.


0

You can do this by searching for substrings before using slice. However you could use a regular expression instead: var regex = /width=([\d\.]*).*height=([\d\.]*)/ var dimensions = regex.exec(srcString); This expression searches for "width" and "height" and selects any digit or dot after them in dimensions[1] and dimensions[2].


-1

Yes. Those claiming single and double quotes are identical in Python are simply wrong. Otherwise in the following code, the double-quoted string would not have taken an extra 4.5% longer for Python to process: import time time_single = 0 time_double = 0 for i in range(10000000): # String Using Single Quotes time1 = time.time() str_single1 = ...


0

How is this? Uses two variables to store steps, increments by 10. step1=0; step2=8; str1="This is a basic string to hopefully demonstrate the lines of python code below"; while(len(str1)>step1) : print(str1[step1]); if(len(str1)>step2): print(str1[step2]); step1+=10; step2+=10; Outputs: T a b r n p f m n t e o c d Update: Using List ...


1

>>> string = 'abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz0123456789' >>> sum(zip(string[0::10], string[9::10]), ()) ('a', 'j', 'k', 't', 'u', '3') And a 100% lazy evaluation (use izip instead of zip for python 2): >>> from itertools import islice #, izip >>> string = 'abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz0123456789' >>> it = ...


0

put a sc.nextLine(); after int songs = sc.nextInt();


0

Either use nextInt or nextLine, I would opt for nextLine: import java.util.Scanner; public class Album{ public static void main(String[] args){ Scanner sc = new Scanner(System.in); System.out.println("How many songs do your CD contain?"); int songs = Integer.parseInt(sc.nextLine()); // instead of nextInt() String[] songNames = new ...


0

Add a sc.nextLine() after sc.nextInt() and your code works fine. The reason is the end of line after you type the nomber of songs.


3

Change int songs = sc.nextInt(); to: int songs = Integer.parseInt(sc.nextLine().trim()); and it will work fine. You should not mix usages of nextInt with nextLine.


1

add sc.nextLine(); after int songs = sc.nextInt(); Once you enter a number and read it using a scanner ( as a number) using sc.nextInt();, the newline character will be present in the input stream which will be read when you do sc.nextLine(). So,to skip(over) it, you need call sc.nextLine() after sc.nextInt();


1

This would work: val a = """_abc_ABC( { x = 1 y = 2 })""" val Re = """(?s)_abc_ABC\((.*)\)""".r a match { case Re(content) => println(content) } The (?s) makes it match over multiple lines.


2

The real Java source code for equalsIgnoreCase is as follows: public boolean equalsIgnoreCase(String anotherString) { return (this == anotherString) ? true : (anotherString != null) && (anotherString.value.length == value.length) && regionMatches(true, 0, anotherString, 0, value.length); } The code ...


2

From this link there seem to be Locales where some upper- and lowercases don't match. The example used is turkish where if (x.toLowerCase().equals("list")) will not return true for x="LIST". I would suspect that there are several such cases therefore the options are either to specify the locale which seems to have to potential to produce a lot of other ...


1

You can use this preg_replace: $repl = preg_replace('/(<[^>]*>)/', '<b>$1</b>', $str); <b>< Jens ></b> is my name. I play <b>< Football ></b>. I saw <b>< Steffy ></b> Yesterday. Yeah, We will be <b>< Together ></b> For sure. RegEx Demo


2

For Much better understanding and learning regex for the further work you can visit the below links Learning Regular Expressions Useful regular expression tutorial Regular expressions tutorials And one of the best and easy one and my favourite is ...


1

Use preg_replace_callback(): <?php // header('Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8'); $test = <<<TXT < Jens > is my name. I play < Football >. I saw < Steffy > Yesterday. Yeah, We will be < Together > For sure. TXT; $result = preg_replace_callback( '/<[^>]+>/', function($matches){ return ...


0

trim_whitespace("abc"); will try to modify a constant data. "abc" is a constant and might be allocated in constant space (ie: a location in memory which is reserved for read only access).


0

You are modifying the content in str in the function, but modifying a string literal is undefined behavior. Instead of: trim_whitespace("abc"); You can use: str abc[] = "abc"; trim_whitespace(abc);


1

String str1 = "fruit;mango;apple;banana"; String str2 = "animal;dog;cat;cow"; String[] arrStr1 = str1.split(";"); String[] arrStr2 = str2.split(";"); ArrayList<String> fruit = null; if(arrStr1[0].equals("fruit")) { fruit = new ArrayList<String>(Arrays.asList(arrStr1)); fruit.remove("fruit"); } ArrayList<String> animal = null; ...


1

Here's use following code: String data="fruit;mango;apple;banana"; List<String> fruitList=new ArrayList<String>(); List<String> animalList=new ArrayList<String>(); String tok[]=data.split(";"); if(tok[0].equals("fruit")) { for(int i=1;i<tok.length;i++) { fruitList.add(tok[i]); ...


1

Try this: String s = "fruit;mango;apple;banana" ; String[] elements = s.split(";"); if(elements.length > 0){ if(elements[0].equals("fruit")){ String[] fruits = new String[elements.length-1]; System.arraycopy(elements, 1,fruits , 0, elements.length-1); System.out.println(Arrays.toString(fruits)); } }


1

You can write extension contains: extension String { func contains(find: String) -> Bool{ if let temp = self.rangeOfString(find){ return true } return false } } Example: var value = "Hello world" println(value.contains("Hello")) // true println(value.contains("bo")) // false


-1

In Swift is it called rangeOfString "hello".rangeOfString("ell") returns a range {Some "1..<4"}


1

Just cast it explicitly to NSString: var str = "Hello, playground" (str as NSString).containsString("Hello") However if there's a pure swift way to do that, I would use it - it's always better to avoid bridging unless really needed.


1

you can use: var str = "Hello, playground" if str.rangeOfString("Hello") != nil { println("exists") }


1

Similar to the answer from Neo, but in a loop to get all instances within the string: string Test = "abcdefgcd"; int index = Test.IndexOf("cd"); while (index > -1) { //DoSomething(); index = Test.IndexOf("cd", ++index); } The first IndexOf checks for the existence of what you want, whilst the second IndexOf (in the loop) checks for a match ...


1

Try this. String.IndexOf(...) != -1 For more infö, read here.


0

$str='AAA(BEA)/BBB(BER)/BBB(OFF)'; $str=str_lreplace(')/BBB(', ', ', $str); function str_lreplace($search, $replace, $subject){ $pos = strrpos($subject, $search); if($pos !== false){ $subject = substr_replace($subject, $replace, $pos, strlen($search)); } return $subject; }


0

There is no build in function that will do that. having a for loop should do what you want. something like that: string str = string.empty; for (i=0;i<ch.length;i++) { if (i != ch.length) { str += ch[i] + ch[i+1]; } } also you can use regex however that wont be fast either. In order to optimize this on a large scale you can implement byte ...


-1

The ASCII code of your string characters is your friend in this case, full working example below: var yourString = "abcdefg"; var x = '\0'; for (var i = 0; i < yourString.Length; i++) { //check whether i+1 index is not out of range if (i + 1 != yourString.Length) { var ...


0

There are various method to do that (componentsSeparatedByString, NSScanner, ...). Here is one using only Swift library functions: let str = "69 - 13" // split string into components: let comps = split(str, { $0 == "-" || $0 == " " }, maxSplit: Int.max, allowEmptySlices: false) // convert strings to numbers (use zero if the conversion fails): let nums = ...


0

You should use DataInputStream and DataOutputStream. Then you can simply use the readUTF() and writeUTF() methods: // Client: send String DataOutputStream out = ...; out.writeUTF("Some string"); // Server: receive String DataInputStream in = ...; String text = in.readUTF();


4

Use regular expression. str = 'abc76.5_pol0.00_Ev0.3'; C = regexp(str, '[a-zA-Z]*', 'match');


1

You can also use strsplit with a RegularExpression option. C = strsplit(str, '[^a-zA-Z]', 'DelimiterType', 'RegularExpression')


1

This should solve your problem: String wholetext = "Place Then Pin- **110065 Name and address** Alias 1 ID of customer-123 Some Place "; String textafter = "110065 Name and address"; String textbefore = "ID of customer"; int index1 = wholetext.indexOf(textbefore); int index2 = wholetext.indexOf(textafter) + textafter.length(); ...


2

This is the solution that I found output = regexp(str, '[^a-zA-Z]', 'split'); output(cellfun(@isempty,output)) = [];


0

You can definitely use Java's Pattern matching to solve your problem. This will help you solve your current problem and any future Regex problems See: http://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/util/regex/Pattern.html


1

If waht you want is after the last occurence of **, you can try String substring = wholetext.substring(wholetext.lastIndexOf("**")); System.out.println(substring);


0

File name without file extension when you don't know that extension: $basename = substr($filename, 0, strrpos($filename, "."));


1

You can use Regexes(Regular Expressions). there are a lot of regex learning sites over internet. i hope this helps.


0

Thanks to MoshMage, this piece of code solved my problem. The $match variable now holds the product name. $current_title = get_the_title(); $titles = new WP_Query( array( 'post_type' => 'products', 'posts_per_page' => -1 ) ); if( $titles->have_posts() ) { while( $titles->have_posts() ) { $titles->the_post(); $title = ...


0

I'm no expert in ruby but this works: #!/usr/bin/env ruby str = "[#<Addrinfo: 127.0.0.1>, #<Addrinfo: 192.168.0.4>]" puts str.scan(/(?<=: )[\d.]+(?=>)/) The regular expression could be simpler but I've used positive lookahead and lookbehind assertion to ensure that the IP address are followed and preceded by the correct characters. By ...



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