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7

As Peter mentioned in his answer, "string".split(), in both Java and Scala, does not return trailing empty strings. You can, however, specify for it to return trailing empty strings by passing in a second parameter, like this: String s = "elem1, elem2,,"; String[] tokens = s.split(",", -1); And that will get you the expected result. You can find the ...


0

Instead of using (double equals) == use indexOf() != -1 as shown below code and let me know whether it works or not: if(val.indexOf("Activation Successful")!=-1||val.indexOf("Your Account is already activated.")!=-1) { window.location="dashboard.php"; }


2

I believe that trailing empty spaces are not included in a return value.


0

As I said in the comments, there are a lot of problems with your code, here is a working version: import java.security.MessageDigest; import java.security.NoSuchAlgorithmException; public class Sha1 { private String value = null; public Sha1(final String input) { final StringBuffer sb = new StringBuffer(); try { final ...


1

You have whitespaces where i have written underscores <p id="error_record">_<?php echo $msg; ?>_</p>, that is why your strings are not equat. Either remove the whitespaces, or use .trim() fuction on your innerHTML to remove the whitespace.


-1

Change it to sb1 = sb.toString(); this works


1

Your problem is that your sha1 method is creating a new instance and setting the String of that new instance. Therefore, sb1 of your original instance (the one created in the main method) is never updated. Change : sha1 rr= new sha1(); .... rr.sb1=sb.toString(); To : sb1 = sb.toString(); In addition, it doesn't look like you call printkey, which calls ...


1

That's simply because there is no string inside your comment. Comment contents have no structure: IIRC they are not even tokenized. The only special character sequence inside a multiline comment is */, and that's it. About why, what would you do instead? Try and parse the comment content as C++ code? What would lead to madness!


0

This this: import java.util.regex.Matcher; import java.util.regex.Pattern; /** * Hello world! * */ public class App { static String myString = "abc,QWAB 123,cdef"; static String abcPattern = "(AB[\\s]{1}\\d{1,3})"; public static void main(String[] args) { Pattern pattern = Pattern.compile(App.abcPattern, Pattern.CASE_INSENSITIVE); Matcher ...


2

There is no way to cast the entire vector to an array of pointers to pointers. You can treat the active portion of the vector as if it were an array of vector's elements, but in this case that would be an array of string objects, not pointers to char*. Trying to re-interpret it as anything else would be undefined. If you are certain that the API is not ...


0

Try something like: String myString = "abc,QWAB 123,cdef"; if (myString.matches(".*AB [0-9]{1,3}.*")) { System.out.println("Yes it mateched"); } else { System.out.println("Hard luck"); }


0

This is similar to rayryeng's answer but replaces the for loop by bsxfun. After the strings have been reduced to unique labels (line 1 of code below), bsxfun is applied to create a matrix of pairwise comparisons between all (possibly repeated) labels. Keeping only the lower "half" of that matrix and summing along rows gives how many times each label has ...


0

^[^,]+,AB \d{1,3},.*$ Try this.This should do it.See demo. https://regex101.com/r/gX5qF3/8


3

Pattern pat = Pattern.compile( "AB \\d{1,3}" );


0

Same here. For now I use localized XIB files where I have to, because some of my xib's are working properly with .strings files. Sad thing that this bug was found almost year ago here.


1

"Are there member functions of std::string that let me do that?" In short: No. That std::vector<std::string> stores the std::string instances in a contiguous array, doesn't mean that the pointers to the underlying char arrays of these string instances appear contiguously in memory.


2

You're getting an error because the file 1a.txt doesn't exist, and because you didn't specify a mode to open() Python attempts to open it in read mode. So you just need to open it in 'w' mode. I assume you'd like the new file to be written with a similar format to the input data. So try this: import operator sort_key = operator.itemgetter(0) #sort_key ...


0

I think you get an error as $sql .= implode(',', $valuesArr); just append the imploded array to your predefined string and so the SQL-Statement is invalid. edit: After reading your now posted errors message. When I understand your script correctly $valuesArr[] = "('$improve_list' )"; is too much. The final result of this would be ('ADHD,ASPERGER'). I think ...


0

Fast and clean: // if it's not already is, convert to a JSON object JSONObject jsonObject = new JSONObject(jsonString); // To string method prints it with specified indentation System.out.println(jsonObject.toString(4));


1

You can use replace All function like this String yourString ="I love this phone, its super fast and there's so much new and cool things with jelly bean....but of recently I've seen some bugs." yourString=yourString.replaceAll("stop" ,"");


0

Compares the specified String to this String using the Unicode values of the characters. Answer 0 if the strings contain the same characters in the same order. Answer a negative integer if the first non-equal character in this String has a Unicode value which is less than the Unicode value of the character at the same position in the specified string, or if ...


0

All right, I was able to manage it. Thank you for your help! Here is the working code: print_hex: pusha mov si, HEX_OUT + 2 next_character: mov bx, dx and bx, 0xf000 shr bx, 4 add bh, 0x30 cmp bh, 0x39 jg add_7 add_character_hex: mov al, bh mov [si], bh inc si shl dx, 4 or dx, dx jnz next_character mov bx, HEX_OUT call ...


1

I want to know how many flops or cycles does it take I assume you are interested in CPU cycles/timings. To measure CPU time per thread under windows you can use GetThreadTimes WinAPI function, you can wrap its call using JNI. To get cycles you will want to use QueryThreadCycleTime function. Both will return times/cycles per thread, so even if some ...


0

It is O(n) where n is the number of matching chars in both strings. In the worst case where one string is prefix of the other n will be the length of the shorter string. For example "test".compareTo("testa").


2

I don't know how to answer that in terms of flops or cycles, but in terms of what's actually being done when you call compareTo, the actual processing depends on the number of identical characters the two Strings share in their beginning, since compareTo will only test as many characters as required to find the first non-equal character. In your example, ...


0

java.lang.String class source is available. For example in JRE 1.6.0_38 it is implemented in following way: public int compareTo(String anotherString) { int len1 = count; int len2 = anotherString.count; int n = Math.min(len1, len2); char v1[] = value; char v2[] = anotherString.value; int i = offset; int j = anotherString.offset; ...


0

Try storing the stopwords in a set collection, and than tokenise your string to a list. You can afterwards simply use 'removeAll' to get the result. Set<String> stopwords = new Set<>() //fill in the set with your file String s="I love this phone, its super fast and there's so much new and cool things with jelly bean....but of recently I've seen ...


1

Try the program below. String s="I love this phone, its super fast and there's so" + " much new and cool things with jelly bean....but of recently I've seen some bugs."; String[] words = s.split(" "); ArrayList<String> wordsList = new ArrayList<String>(); Set<String> stopWordsSet = new HashSet<String>(); ...


0

It should work: storeEval "${LastGroup}".split(" ")[0] Note - There is blank "space" in split.


2

The error is because you remove element from the list you iterate on. Let says you have wordsList that contains |word0|word1|word2| If ii is equal to 1 and the if test is true, then you call wordsList.remove(1);. After that your list is |word0|word2|. ii is then incremented and is equal to 2 and now it's above the size of your list, hence word2 will never be ...


0

Try using replaceAll api of String like: String myString = "I love this phone, its super fast and there's so much new and cool things with jelly bean....but of recently I've seen some bugs."; String stopWords = "I|its|with|but"; String afterStopWords = myString.replaceAll("(" + stopWords + ")\\s*", ""); System.out.println(afterStopWords); OUTPUT: love ...


1

This is a much more elegant solution (IMHO), using only regular expressions: // instead of the ".....", add all your stopwords, separated by "|" // "\\b" is to account for word boundaries, i.e. not replace "his" in "this" // the "\\s?" is to suppress optional trailing white space Pattern p = Pattern.compile("\\b(I|this|its.....)\\b\\s?"); ...


2

Instead why don't you use below approach. It will be easier to read and understand : for(String word : words){ s = s.replace(word+"\\s*", ""); } System.out.println(s);//It will print removed word string.


1

Here's try it following way: String s="I love this phone, its super fast and there's so much new and cool things with jelly bean....but of recently I've seen some bugs."; String stopWords[]={"love","this","cool"}; for(int i=0;i<stopWords.length;i++){ if(s.contains(stopWords[i])){ s=s.replaceAll(stopWords[i]+"\\s+", ""); //note ...


0

If you want an alternative to unique, you can work with a hash table, which in Matlab would entail to using the containers.Map object. You can then store the occurrences of each individual label and create the new labels on the go, like in the code below. data={'table','table','chair','bike','bike','bike'}; map=containers.Map(data,zeros(numel(data),1)); % ...


0

Use the String.equals(String other) function to compare strings, not the ==operator. The function checks the actual contents of the string, the == operator checks whether the references to the objects are equal. Note that string constants are usually "interned" such that two constants with the same value can actually be compared with==, but it's better not ...


0

Here is the code. You are doing it right, to remove the characters and keeping only digits. The same is being done for variable "temp1"(in the below code). In the second step, using the length function, to calculate the total length of the string which now contains only digits. In the third step using the substr function to extract the last two digits. If ...


1

I would suggest looking at using "data.table" and setting your key to the split columns. You can use cSplit from my "splitstackshape" function to easily split the column. Sample Data: df <- data.frame( V1 = c("QW1I1K1", "QW1I1K2", "QW1I1K3", "QW1I1K4", "QW2I1K5", "QW2I3K2"), V2 = c(15, 20, 5, 6, 7, 9)) df # V1 V2 # 1 QW1I1K1 15 # 2 ...


2

May be this helps Q <- array(dat$Col2, dim=c(15,4,30)) dat$Col2[dat$Col1=='QW1I1K5'] #[1] 34 Q[1,1,5] #[1] 34 dat$Col2[dat$Col1=='QW4I3K8'] #[1] 38 Q[4,3,8] #[1] 38 If you want the index along with the values library(reshape2) d1 <- melt(Q) head(d1,3) # Var1 Var2 Var3 value #1 1 1 1 12 #2 2 1 1 9 #3 3 1 1 29 ...


1

Interesting problem! This is the procedure that I would try: Use unique - the third output parameter in particular to assign each string in your cell array to a unique ID. Initialize an empty array, then create a for loop that goes through each unique string - given by the first output of unique - and creates a numerical sequence from 1 up to as many ...


2

try this way used .equals() method for String comparison if (STR_Action.equals("ATA+"))


2

The absolutely most basic way: loop through the first string, check for its containment in the second. It looks like your union and intersect shouldn't have duplicates (if they can this is a much harder problem). /** Returns the union of the two strings, case insensitive. Takes O( (|S1| + |S2|) ^2 ) time. */ public static String union(String s1, String ...


0

I'll give you a psuedocode, try it yourself, post the code if it doesn't work Initiate a counter to 1 Iterate over the cell If counter > 1 check with previous value if the string is same then increment counter else No- reset counter to 1 end sprintf the string value + counter into a new array Hope this helps!


0

In java, when you declare a new String it is added to the String pool if a string with the same value does not exist in the pool already. String pool allows JVM to reuse string constants that have already been added to the pool before to save memory. That's why when you define S2 with the same value as S1, the JVM is going to reuse S1 which already exist in ...


1

String s1 = new String(“come back”); // create a new object in heap. Dynamic allocation, it is given by programmer String s2 = “come back”; // A new String object gets created only if a matching String object with the same value isn’t found in the String constant pool. Static allocation, memory is assigned by JVM String s3 = "come back"; // using ...


1

try add a .c_str() to the end of your substr() line. int p; long unsigned int z; while (i <= x.length()) { const int a = x.length(); const char* b; b = x.substr(sizeof(a) - i, 1).c_str(); p = atoi(b); z = (z + p + 3) * 3; i++; }


3

Strings literals are interned, so literals with identical contents will actually use the same underlying reference. You can intern any String, using intern(): String s1 = new String("a"); String s2 = new String("a"); // false System.out.println("References equal? " + (s1 == s2)); s1 = s1.intern(); s2 = s2.intern(); // true System.out.println("References ...


0

A dash is a punctuation mark that is similar to a hyphen or minus sign, but differs from both of these symbols primarily in length and function. The most common versions of the dash are the en dash (–) and the em dash (—), named for the length of a typeface's lower-case n and upper-case M respectively. Reference Just replace - with – because when you ...


1

Somehow, Google doesn't respect the ie=UTF8 query parameter. We need to add some headers to our request so that UTF8 is returned: WebClient webClient = new WebClient(); webClient.Encoding = System.Text.Encoding.UTF8; webClient.Headers.Add(HttpRequestHeader.UserAgent, "Mozilla/5.0"); webClient.Headers.Add(HttpRequestHeader.AcceptCharset, "UTF-8");


6

If you're stepping backwards through an iterable (i.e. step is negative), you need to swap the order of the start and end values so that start > end: >>> seq = '12345' >>> seq[2:4:-1] '' >>> seq[4:2:-1] '54' Otherwise, you'll get back an empty string (or empty list or empty tuple). Do note that seq[4:2:-1] does not produce ...



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