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0

You can try this public class ASCII { public static void main(String[] args) { String plaintext = "sallywenttotheseashoretocollectseashellsxx"; int a_code[]; a_code = new int[plaintext.length()]; for(int i = 0; i < plaintext.length(); i++){ a_code[i] = (int)plaintext.charAt(i) - 'a'; } for(int i = 0; i < ...


0

We can start with the identity you've given 'a' = 0, that means we can just subtract 'a' from any given character. That is something like, String plaintext = "sallywenttotheseashoretocollectseashellsxx"; char[] letterArray = plaintext.toCharArray(); int[] array = new int[letterArray.length]; for (int i = 0; i < letterArray.length; i++) { array[i] = ...


0

String plaintext = "sallywenttotheseashoretocollectseashellsxx"; int arr[] = new int[plaintext.length()]; for(int i=0;i<plaintext.length();i++){ arr[i]= plaintext.charAt(i)-96; } you can convert your text to lowercase, in case it may also have uppercase letters


0

You can deduct the character 'a' from the character itself so that would give 0 for 'a', 1 for 'b' etc. int[] digits = new int[plaintext.length()]; for(int i = 0; i < chars.length; i++) { digits[i] = plaintext.charAt(i) - 'a'; } NOTE: this will only work for lowercase letters


1

The following code works for lower case only: int[] string_to_numbers = new int[s.length()]; for(int i=0; i<s.length(); i++){ string_to_numbers[i] = s.charAt(i)-'a'; }


2

Well, your question is sort of poorly defined, but here's what you could do: char[] chars = text.toCharArray(); int[] results = new int[text.length()]; for(int i = 0; i < text.length(); i++) { //your poorly defined conversion int conversion = someOperation(c); results[i] = someOperation(chars[i]) } If the letter a maps to 0, what does the ...


2

This can be an odd problem if you've never run into it before. Sometimes not only an '\n' character is included for a new line (which you seem to be familiar with already) but an '\r' character for a "carriage return" as well. This is meant to represent how typewriters would need to move all the way back to the left, in addition to skipping down a space, to ...


0

One way to solve the problem would be as follows: with open('testfile.txt', 'r') as f: for line in f: newline = line.replace(' "', '("') newline = newline.replace('\n', ')\n') print newline This wouldn't presume that every line starts with Msg.


1

Instead of using replace, you could take advantage of the fact that the parentheses are always inserted at the 4th position and the last position: with open('testfile.txt', 'r') as fileopening: next(fileopening) for line in fileopening: print('{}({})'.format(line[:3], line[4:-1])) By the way, since you are using Python3, note that print is ...


1

You do use a tuple mypath = os.path.abspath('1.jpg') cmd = 'gimp-console-2.8 -b -idf --batch-interpreter python-fu-eval -b "import sys,os;sys.path=[\'.\']+sys.path;import mycode;mycode.doit(\'%s\')" -b "pdb.gimp_quit(0)"' % (mypath) os.system(cmd) Or using a format string mypath = os.path.abspath('1.jpg') cmd = 'gimp-console-2.8 -b -idf ...


1

It looks like what you want to do is insert a variable into the middle of a string. This is done with string formatting. Python has a couple different ways of doing it, but the simplest is the str.format method, as explained in the tutorial section Fancier Output Formatting: cmd1 = 'mycode.doit({0})'.format(mypath) if mypath is, say, the string ...


0

I can think of two possible reasons that this is happening. You are using a single quoted string: $array = preg_split("/\n|,/", 'foo,bar\nbaz'); print_r($array); Array ( [0] => foo [1] => bar\nbaz ) If so, use double quotes " instead. $array = preg_split("/\n|,/", "foo,bar\nbaz"); print_r($array); Array ( [0] => foo [1] => ...


0

The layout of a slice (&[T] or &str) is a pointer followed by a length, as documented by the Slice struct of the std::raw module. That's why reading the version field from your C code shows the length of the name field's value. You should use *const u8 or *const i8 (or perhaps *const libc::c_char, where libc is a crate you must reference with extern ...


3

you can use a functional replace to push data into unbroken strings: var replaced = "Closes @ in @ min".replace(/@/g, [].shift.bind(['early', 55]) ); document.write(replaced); //=="Closes early in 55 min" or, with just one symbol, it's even cleaner: "Closes in @ min".replace("@", 55 ); // == "Closes in 55 min" this lets you avoid all the ...


0

In javascript you just use + symbols to separate string, if you want in to be in-between or add it to other strings, "hi there" + person + "how are you today" + good; This assumes before you have declared the variables var person var good


4

In javascript you would just put the variable in between the string. But make sure its a string not an array or something else. So for example you might have var string = "mystring"; outputString = "blah blah " + string + " blah blah blah"; this would output //blah blah mystring blah blah blah


0

Split the input by the '.' character. Then loop through the fragments, adding them all back in, but skip the 2nd sentence. Something like this: public static void main(String args[]) { String paragraph = "Hello. This is a paragraph. Foo bar. Bar foo."; String result = ""; int i = 0; for (String s : paragraph.split("\\.")) { if (i++ ...


0

Just needed chance sentenceend to int sentenceend = edit.substring(sentencestart+1).indexOf('.') + sentencestart; I thought I had tried that, but apparently not


0

Why not just split by . and get the required line like string edit = "The cow goes moo. The cow goes boo. The cow goes roo. The cow goes jew."; return edit.Substring(edit.Split('.')[0].Length + 1,edit.Length - edit.Split('.')[0].Length - 1); Output: The cow goes boo. The cow goes roo. The cow goes jew. Disclaimer: Above code is in C# syntax and not Java ...


1

For the sake of completitude i made a list with tuples, the first component of the tuple may be your first column and same for the second element. What you need is something like the manipulation method for your case: lista = [('a','aa'),('b','bbb'), ('c','b'), ('d','nn'),('ee','e')] def manipulation(first, second): if first in second: return ...


0

Another alternative that might be pretty fast: DF[cbind(seq_len(nrow(DF)), max.col(!is.na(DF), "last"))] #[1] "Cucumber" "Apple" "Lime" "Honey" Where "DF": DF = structure(list(a_1 = structure(1:4, .Label = c("Apple", "Grapes", "Melon", "Peach"), class = "factor"), a_2 = structure(c(4L, 2L, 3L, 1L), .Label = c("Honey", "Kiwi", "Lime", "Nuts"), ...


0

char is an integer type. The range of char is [-128;127] char* is a pointer which point to a single char in memory. By convention what we call a string is an array of char with 0x00 as last character. For example: char str[10]; str[0] = 'S'; str[1] = 'o'; str[2] = '\0'; // \0 represent the character of value 0 Here I use ' and not ", because ' represent ...


1

You are correct that a pointer is just a variable that points somewhere -- in this case it points to a string of characters somewhere in memory. By convention, strings (arrays of char) end with a null character (0), so operations like strlen can terminate safely without overflowing a buffer. As for where that particular pointer (in your first example) ...


0

The code and the thinking is not wrong; and will work as is. I would question the motive and the means to achieve it. The class is not safe in terms of bounds checking. For instance, if ctor is given a string exceeding the capacity, BANG. Heap memory management is as efficient as it can be, and I do not foresee performance problems for 99.99% applications. ...


3

That is because a char is by definition a single character (like in your 3rd case). If you want a string, you can either use a array of chars which decays to const char* (like in your first case) or, the C++ way, use std::string.


3

Yes, your thinking is correct: buffer is not a VLA. Hopefully by this method all memory is on stack and I don't run into any issues with new, delete and so on. This is also correct in the sense that you don't need to manage any memory by hand. One (potentially significant) wrinkle is that string_test<T, m> and string_test<T, n> are ...


0

You could also try: (df1 is the dataset) indx <- which(!is.na(df1), arr.ind=TRUE) df1[cbind(1:nrow(df1),tapply(indx[,2], indx[,1], FUN=max))] #[1] "Cucumber" "Apple" "Lime" "Honey"


0

Just for fun. No import, no def, no indentation. d = {'a' : ['1', '+', '='], 'b' : ['2'], 'c' : ['3']} for key in d: d[key].append(key) print reduce(lambda items, f: sum(map(f, items), []), [lambda msg, c=c: [msg.replace(c, r) for r in d[c]] for c in d.keys()], ["abcde"]) Result: [ '123de', '1b3de', '12cde', '1bcde', '+23de', '+b3de', '+2cde', ...


0

Most shortest code: strs = {'HA' 'KU' 'LA' 'MA' 'TATA'}; [~,ind]=ismember('KU', strs) But it returns only first position in strs. If element not found then ind=0.


5

There's no need for regex here. Just use apply + tail + na.omit: > apply(mydf, 1, function(x) tail(na.omit(x), 1)) [1] "Cucumber" "Apple" "Lime" "Honey" I don't know how this compares in terms of speed, but you You can also use a combination of "data.table" and "reshape2", like this: library(data.table) library(reshape2) ...


2

Here is one approach. Since you want to allow non-replacement (e.g., leaving "a" as "a"), it is better to include the original character in the list of replacement values, so that the dict has, e.g., 'a': ['a', '1', '+', '=']. This can be done with: for k in d: d[k].append(k) Then: subs = [[(k, v) for v in vs] for k, vs in d.iteritems()] rez = [] ...


4

Sure, itertools is always the answer for these kind of problems. There may be better alternatives but the first that comes to my mind is using itertools.product: from itertools import product [''.join(chars) for chars in product(*[[x] + d.get(x, []) for x in word])] Output ['abcde', 'ab3de', 'a2cde', 'a23de', '1bcde', '1b3de', '12cde', '123de', ...


0

It is true, java uses Unicode internally so it may combine any script/language. String and char use UTF-16BE but .class files store there String constants in UTF-8. In general it is irrelevant what String does, as there is a conversion to bytes specifying the encoding the bytes have to be in. If this encoding of the bytes cannot represent some of the ...


2

You may also try: library(stringi) stri_count(str, regex="(?i)hello") #[1] 2


2

Yes. Not only is it guaranteed to be UTF-16, but the byte order is defined too: When decoding, the UTF-16 charset interprets the byte-order mark at the beginning of the input stream to indicate the byte-order of the stream but defaults to big-endian if there is no byte-order mark; when encoding, it uses big-endian byte order and writes a big-endian ...


0

Use JSON.parse() Read more about it here: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/JSON/parse Node.js has JSON by default, so you can just use it. Example: var object = JSON.parse("{hello:'world'}"); will give you an object which you can persist to MongoDB.


0

Tillito's answer does not handle strings already containing spaces well, or Acronyms. This fixes it: public static string SplitCamelCase(string input) { return Regex.Replace(str, "(?<=[a-z])([A-Z])", " $1", RegexOptions.Compiled); }


2

Perhaps the easiest and most straightforward way would be to use str_count from stringr > str <- "Hello this is devavrata! here, say again hello" > library(stringr) > str_count(str, ignore.case("hello")) # [1] 2 Two base R methods are > g <- grep("hello", strsplit(str, " ")[[1]], ignore.case = TRUE) > length(g) # [1] 2 and > r ...


-1

Another Solution: Here i am leveraging java string functions lastIndexOf to return last comma index and substring function to extract from the beginning of the string to the position of last comma. <cffunction name="stripAfter" returntype="String" output="false"> <cfargument name="input" type="string" required="true"> <cfargument ...


0

The FTS module use tokenizers to detect words in the text. There is no built-in tokenizer that ignores HTML tags; you would have to write a custom tokenizer. It might be a better idea use a table with plain text data.


4

Use ListDeleteAt(), using ListLen() to get the position of the last element. ListDeleteAt(list, position [, delimiters ])


2

In addition to what others have said about dangling pointers and such, for this kind of situation, you are better off simply having FileOpenOBJ() return a wstring instead of a copy of the original OPENFILENAME struct: wstring FileOpenOBJ(HWND hWnd, HINSTANCE hInst) { WCHAR szFileName[MAX_PATH+1] = {0}; OPENFILENAME ofn = {0}; ofn.lStructSize = ...


0

Yes, this takes a little bit of thought to get your head round. Think of it like this. A variable name is a bit like a label that you can put on a box; the contents of the variable is whatever's in the box. An immutable object means that once you've got the box and put something in it, the box is then sealed: you can look inside it, but you can't change the ...


0

Here's what I ended up using; works like a charm: [categoryArray sortedArrayWithOptions:0 usingComparator:^NSComparisonResult(id obj1, id obj2) { id<SelectableCategory> cat1 = obj1; id<SelectableCategory> cat2 = obj2; return [cat1.name compare:cat2.name options:NSCaseInsensitiveSearch]; }]; SelectableCategory is just ...


1

Strings themselves are immutable, but you're changing the String value of a variable, not the String itself. That's an important difference - everything in Java is done by reference. You got two lines of output because the loop executes twice, because you have two elements in ListContents.


0

String(s) are immutable. You're changing the reference. String thisCycle="Cycle"; thisCycle="0"; // <-- changes the thisCycle reference. To prevent that, mark the String as final. final String thisCycle="Cycle"; thisCycle="0"; // <-- compiler error. Can't change a final reference. You get two lines of output because your ListContents contains two ...


1

The below regex would matches the strings which has two or more consecutive commas, ^.*?,,+.*$ DEMO You don't need to include start and the end anchors while using the regex with matches method. System.out.println("dog,,,elephant,,,,,".matches(".*?,,+.*")); Output: true


2

String str ="hello,,,457"; Pattern pat = Pattern.compile("[,]{2,}"); Matcher matcher = pat.matcher(str); if(matcher.find()){ System.out.println("contains 2 or more commas"); }


-3

Try: int occurance = StringUtils.countOccurrencesOf("dog,,,elephant,,,,,", ",,"); or int count = StringUtils.countMatches("dog,,,elephant,,,,,", ",,"); depend which library you use: Check the solution here: How do I count the number of occurrences of a char in a String?


0

The following works, str = str.replaceAll('<!\\[CDATA\\[', ''); // replace '<![CDATA[' str= str.replaceAll('\\]\\]>', ''); // replace ']]'



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