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0

$ f=20140613 $ g=${f#????}${f%????} $ echo $g 06132014 Or use awk/sed/cut/etc.


0

Through sed, $ echo 20140613 | sed 's/^\(.\{4\}\)\(.\{4\}\)$/\2\1/g' 06132014


0

Using sed: STRING="20140613" STRING=$(echo $STRING | sed 's/\(....\)\(.*\)/\2\1/')


0

Using pure BASH regex: s='20140613' [[ "$s" =~ ^(.*)([[:digit:]]{4})$ ]] && echo "${BASH_REMATCH[2]}${BASH_REMATCH[1]}" 06132014


0

Don't do this. Use os.path instead. For instance: >>> import os.path >>> path = 'C:\\Docs\\Bob\\blah\\blah\\blah' >>> base = 'C:\\Docs' >>> os.path.relpath(path, base) 'Bob\\blah\\blah\\blah' Also, using os.path will ensure that your code will work on other platforms, not just Windows (assuming the base path is set ...


0

If you want to find the last slash you can simply do: last_slash_index = path.rfind('/') Then retrieving the text before or after that (I'm unsure what you meant) just do either of these: text_before_last_slash = path[:last_slash_index] text_after_last_slash = path[last_slash_index:] Alternatively, you could split the text based on that slash AND ...


0

Try this: (?i)\b(?:(?![×Þß÷þø])[a-zÀ-ÿ])+\b This is a form of character class subtraction (as Perl doesn't support those directly) [a-zÀ-ÿ] matches accented characters in the range À-ÿ, but also some we don't want The negative lookahead (?![×Þß÷þø]) ensures we don't match the unwanted characters


0

Your problem is that "\n" translates to a newline in java. If you want to check that it's equal to the input, use two backslashes to escape out the single backslash. Ergo if(input.equalsIgnoreCase("\\n"))


0

Scanner already uses \n as its delimiter, so you don't need to check for the newline, and it also removes the \n char for you. If you want to check for an empty string use "" instead.


-1

You should consider reading the glyphs from the GSUB (Glyph Substitution) table of the TTF (True Type Font) (https://www.microsoft.com/typography/tt/tt_open/msdn/ttoch03.doc) try to make use of the ScriptGetFontAlternateGlyphs function of the Uniscribe API (Windows lib) (http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/dd368546%28v=vs.85%29.aspx)


0

Leading zeros are not allowed for integers, but maybe this article can help you How to: Pad a Number with Leading Zeros


0

I would do this way: template <typename OSS_Ty> OSS_Ty string_convert(const std::string& input); template <typename OSS_Ty> OSS_Ty string_convert(const std::wstring& input); template <> std::wstring string_convert(const std::string& input) { /* Do the conversion */ } template <> std::string string_convert(const ...


0

What you want to do is probably to split the string and the write the different lines one at a time to a PrintStream. That way you can use println. Java is a platform independent language, and new lines are platform dependent. Making use of PrintStream.println will make sure your code is portable.


0

You might find this helpful, quoting from the link: "your method returns a String which means the generated WSDL should have a response message of type . As we know, XML strings must encode certain characters as character entity references (i.e. "<" becomes "& lt;" so the XML parser treats it as a string, not the beginning of an XML element as you ...


0

Why do you set the separator to \n?, it should be \t I assume? The following code works fine for jdoodle: String s = "one\ttwo\tthree"; s = s.replaceAll("\t","\r\n"); System.out.println(s); EDIT The reason why this doesn't work is because you query the user for the separator and when he enters \t, this is a string with the first character \ and the ...


3

Your input character for tab seems to be incorrect. This code gives String wordlist="one two three"; wordlist = wordlist.replaceAll("\t", "\r\n"); System.out.println(wordlist); This output- one two three


0

You can try in this way, TimeSpan t1 = (Convert.ToDateTime(TextBox1.Text)).TimeOfDay; TimeSpan t2 = DateTime.Now.TimeOfDay; if(t1 == t2) // Something as you want Let us know the Output.


0

Use DateTime.TryParseExact Method as the following: if (DateTime.TryParseExact(timeStringValue, timeStringFormat, new CultureInfo("en-US"), DateTimeStyles.None, out dateTimeValue)) { } else { }


0

The correct approach here is to not use DateTime but to use TimeSpan as you are dealing with a time rather than a date. var inputText = "12:22"; // get this from whatever your input is TimeSpan result; if (!TimeSpan.TryParse(inputText, out result)) { // handle error } else { // everything okay }


0

If you look at the documentation of Convert.ToChar you could read Converts the first character of a specified string to a Unicode character. Namespace: System Assembly: mscorlib (in mscorlib.dll) Syntax public static char ToChar( string value ) valueType: System.String A string of length 1. That's the reason of your error. ...


0

Convert.ToChar(string) requires that the string only contain a single character. You need to gaurrantee this for each of the strings before you call it, or manually select the first character from the string, or something similar. Docs for Convert.ToChar(string), throws FormatException "The length of value is not 1." ...


1

Use DateTime.TryParse and if it returns true, the string is a valid date. Looks like you want to check for a Timespan and not for a datetime, therefore use TimeSpan.TryParse instead. If you want a specific format, use TimeSpan.TryParseExact. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/3z48198e(v=vs.110).aspx ...


0

That looks like a fragment of a JSON document with Cyrillic text.


-1

Try this code. This code will help you. https://gist.github.com/EmilHernvall/953748


1

You could use String#tr's range notation: str = "Somebody help I am on drugs and can't program! Just kidding." str.tr('a-z', 'b-za') #=> "Spnfcpez ifmq I bn po esvht boe dbo'u qsphsbn! Jvtu ljeejoh." Or String#gsub's hash replacement: mapping = ("a".."z").zip(("a".."z").to_a.rotate).to_h #=> {"a"=>"b", "b"=>"c", "c"=>"d", "d"=>"e", ...


3

There is no need to escape forward slashes. Your code works fine if you just do: String[] paths = path.split("/");


1

Assuming you don't receive the elements individually and are just getting a bunch of markup that you want to reformat... If you are receiving the string of text and you want to strip out the different elements, you might want to use a regular expression to match the elements. The following expression would just matches the text [element1] element2 element3 ...


1

I would suggest using an overload instead of adding another specialization: inline std::wstring string_convert(char const *s) { return string_convert<std::wstring, std::string>(s); } If your string_convert function internally works on char buffers then you might gain efficiency to have both the template version and this version call the same ...


0

Try this: string val = "0001"; int getVal = Convert.ToInt32(val);


0

int getVal; string val = "0001"; Int.tryparse(val,out int getVal); For more information http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/32885/Difference-Between-Int-Parse-Convert-ToInt-and is a tutorial tell me any number that is 0001 and not 1? they are the same. It depends on how you print the number or store the number back in a string.


3

You can use Int32.Parse or Int32.TryParse methods. But remember, 0001 is just a textual representation of a number... i.e. a string. When you parse this string, you will get 1 not 0001. There is nothing 0001 as an int. string val = "0001"; int getval; if (Int32.TryParse(val, out getval)) { //Successfull parsing } else { //Your string is not a ...


2

You can convert a string to an int by using int.Parse() or int.TryParse() which won't throw an exception if the parsing fails. However be aware that 0001 and 1 are represented in the exact same way when converted to integer. If you require the trailing zeroes, then you have to retain the string and convert to an int only when you need to do calculations.


1

If I've got it correctly you are trying to implement GetProp this way: unsigned int Interface::GetProp(const char* const szName, char* szValue) { std::string value = m_xmlParser.GetNodeValue(propName); std::vector<char> propValue(value.begin(), value.end()); //propValue is on stack, mistake 1 propValue.push_back('\0'); szValue = ...


2

The declaration of parameter input mismatched. change template <> std::wstring string_convert<std::wstring, char*>(char* const input); to template <> std::wstring string_convert<std::wstring, char*>(char* const & input); BTW: If you tried with clang, the error message is explicit: note: candidate template ignored: ...


0

Try following code String s = "abc\ndef\nghi\n"; String tokens[]=s.split("\n"); for(String tok:tokens) { System.out.println(tok); } Hope it helps


2

Why would you need to use substring and generate new strings and tokenize the piece when you can just iterate over the original string and avoid any object allocation? int c = 1; int line = 1, col = 1; while (c <= i) { if (string.charAt(c) == '\n') { ++line; col = 1; } }


2

String replace(CharSequence target, CharSequence replacement) Replaces each substring of this string that matches the literal target sequence with the specified literal replacement sequence. String replaceAll(String regex, String replacement) Replaces each substring of this string that matches the given regular expression with the given ...


0

unsigned int Interface::GetProp(const char* const szName, char* szValue) The above function can only be meant to be called with an szValue argument pointing to a character buffer of some Interface API specified maximumn size. There's no way to know what that size is from just looking at the function... you should check the documentation as hopefully ...


0

You are transforming the XML to a document and AFTER serializating it... If you only want the file read the file like a text file: BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new FileReader(fileName)); try { StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(); String line = br.readLine(); while (line != null) { sb.append(line); ...


0

In this Statement, First object is created with "abcd" value and it goes in String pool. new keyword always created a new object so when new String("abcd") executed it created a new object. So total two object will be created.


0

You are declaring name as of type char, when it should be typed as string80 (from your typedef). You are also accidentally hiding your typedef by declaring char string80, which hides the typedef from the surrounding scope. You want to declare name as of type string80, not of type char. Something like this: string80 name;


0

The reverseString function accepts char [81] for the x parameter yet you are sending it a char when you are calling it. What you probably wanted to do was declare string80 and name as a char [81] and not a char char string80[81], name[81];


2

DOMDocument can also be used with this: $string = '<tr><td>abc</td><td>def</td><td>ghi</td></tr>'; $dom = new DOMDocument(); $dom->loadHTML($string); foreach($dom->getElementsByTagName('td') as $td) { echo $td->nodeValue . '<br/>'; } You can get td values with this: (Output sample) abc ...


1

Consider simpledom, link here. It would work something like this in your case: $html = str_get_html($string); foreach ($html->find('td') as $td) echo $td->innertext."\n";


1

Found \o/ ( im not very good at english so maybe its not understandable, but well, at least, the code works :P ) In fact you are giving substr a wrong 3rd argument as said @Jack (it should be the length of the cut, so you have to substract first pos to last pos), you had also pos probs, beceause what you search for have a length and you have to take it in ...


0

import Foundation "-23.67".floatValue // => -23.67 let s = "-23.67" as NSString s.floatValue // => -23.67


3

The first one contains non printable 0x20 0x3D 0x20 0x22 characters


0

Actually, the following is the cleanest implementation I have seen so far. It uses an annotation to convert a comment into a string variable... /** <html> <head/> <body> <p> Hello<br/> Multiline<br/> World<br/> </p> </body> </html> */ ...


0

Since you are new to Java, it's time for some general pointers: In Java, we usually name our methods with camelCase, so the first letter is lower case. Also, in Java we usually leave the opening curly-bracket on the same line as the code (no newline). Always use final on your variables. At least your parameters. That way you won't overwrite it, and thus ...


1

The output is not a string at all indeed. Your function does echo but doesn't return anything. Try this function: function Foo($word) { $lowerword= strtolower($word); $words = explode(" ", $lowerword); $firstLetters = ''; foreach ($words as $wrd){ $firstLetters .= $wrd[0]; } return $firstLetters; }



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