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1

You can use two different approaches. Use one of the TimeSpan.From...() methods. Those converts numbers to a TimeSpan. For example to convert the double 27 to a TimeSpan with 27 seconds you use var ts = TimeSpan.FromSeconds(27) The only problem you will face here is that it not allows you to specify a string. So you could for example first parse your ...


1

try something like this: var timeString = "1:24.4"; var timeComponents = timeString.Split(':', '.').Reverse().ToList(); var milliseconds = timeComponents.Any() ? int.Parse(timeComponents[0]) : 0; var seconds = timeComponents.Count() > 1 ? int.Parse(timeComponents[1]) : 0; var minutes = timeComponents.Count() > 2 ? int.Parse(timeComponents[2]) : 0; ...


0

Short but sweet. def recurseString(full, incl): return incl[:1] in full and (incl[:1] == '' or recurseString(full, incl[1:])) The 'and' ensures both parts of the expression are true. The first part - takes the first character of inclusive and searches for it in the full string: incl[:1] in full #returns '' if incl is '' The second part - this ...


2

I am guessing that you are looking for ... In [51]: def recurseString(a,b): ....: if b == '': return True ....: else: ....: if len(b) == 1: return b in a ....: else: return (b[0] in a) and recurseString(a, b[1:]) ....: In [52]: recurseString('jack', 'kjc') Out[52]: True In [53]: recurseString('stan', 'xun') Out[53]: ...


-1

This function will test if all the letters of the 'inclusive' string are in the 'full' string def recurseString(full, inclusive): for y in range(len(inclusive)): print inclusive[y] in full recurseString('jack', 'xun')


0

I don't know why you need recursive to implement it, it's difficult to read and understand. MY GOD, It's a challenge for me to read my code. def recurseSring(full, inclusive): for i in range(len(full)): for j in range(len(inclusive)): if full[i] == inclusive[j]: if recurseSring(full[i + 1:], inclusive[j + 1:]): ...


0

Not sure if this works in c++ but in python there is a thing called a raw string that ignores escapes and the like. It looks like: r"some stuff\not a \new line" or like: R"some stuff\not a \new line" hope that helped!


7

Simply precede each character that needs to be escaped (in your case, all four of them) with a backslash. For instance, this worked for me: std::cout << "Testing: \"\\\"\"" << std::endl; Output: Testing: "\"" Apparently (I just learned this), C++11 provides other (perhaps better) tools for using string literals. The above method of ...


-2

There's a simple approach for this without recursion: create two sets with the strings you want and check if one set is inside the other one. def contains(text, chars): textset = set(text) charset = set(chars) return charset.issubset(textset) print contains("jackie", "ice") # True print contains('jack','kcj') # True print contains('stan','xun') ...


0

std::string foobar("\"foobar\""); std::cout << foobar << std::endl; // Prints "foobar" (with quotes)


1

You can try to add some print statements to help you debug. For example, before the line that is causing you problems: if(words[i].charAt(j)==rep[num.charAt(j)-48-2][column]) you can try adding a statement such as: System.out.println("The current num is: " + num); If right before the program crashes you see: "The current num is 12", then you know what ...


0

def recurseString(str1,str2): if str2 == "": # str2 == "" all str2 letters are in str1 return True elif str2[0] in str1: return recurseString(str1, str2[1:]) # move to next letter in str2 return False # if we get here we have found a letter that is not in str1 In [22]: recurseString('stan','xun') Out[22]: False In [23]: ...


0

To think about any problem recursively, you have to break it into a base case (or sometimes multiple base cases), and a recursive case (or sometimes multiple recursive cases). I'm going to assume that "included by" means "each character in inclusive is also in full, and in fact each character that appears in inclusive N times is also in full at least N ...


1

I'm having some trouble parsing your code, but I think your problem is with the call to num.charAt(j) in your match function. From your outer for loop, j is bounded above by words[i].length()-1, but there is nothing I can see that would promise that num is as long as words[i]; in other words, you have the potential for an out of bounds error.


0

So I finally solved it. I'm posting it in case someone else needs stuff like this. Basically I split the uint16_t values into two uint8_t each, and since those are 8-bit values, they can be used with any base64 implementation out there. Here's my method: #include <iostream> using namespace std; #define BYTE_T uint8_t #define TWOBYTE_T uint16_t ...


0

I think the 1.2 million strings will not fit in memory or easily overflow the size limitation of your memory (consider a bad case where the average string length 256). If some kind of pre-processing is allowed, I think you'd better first reduce the sequence of strings into a sequence of words. It means that you first convert your data into another set of ...


0

See previous question here: base64 decode snippet in c++ Cast uint16_t* to unsigned const char* and encode, like so: // Data to base64 encode std::vector<uint16_t> some_data; // Populate some_data... // ... // base64 encode it std::string base64_data = base64_encode((unsigned char const*)&some_data[0], some_data.size()*2 );


0

Assuming that the uint16_t values range from zero to 63 and that you're using ASCII, just add 0x21 (hex 21) to each value and output it. This will create a printable string, but for display purposed you may also want to print a new line after some number of characters instead of having one very long string being displayed. Any decoder will have to subtract ...


1

You need to use the re.DOTALL flag, otherwise the . regular expression atom will not match newlines. re.DOTALL: Make the '.' special character match any character at all, including a newline; without this flag, '.' will match anything except a newline. So this should do what you want: m = re.match('abc (.*)', msg, re.DOTALL)


2

Use the s ( dotall ) modifier forcing the dot to match all characters, including line breaks. >>> import re >>> msg = "abc 123 \n 456" >>> m = re.match(r'(?s)abc (.*)', msg) >>> m.group(1) '123 \n 456'


0

I used an extension on String to achieve multiline strings while avoiding the compiler hanging bug. It also allows you to specify a separator so you can use it a bit like Python's join function extension String { init(sep:String, _ lines:String...){ self = "" for (idx, item) in enumerate(lines) { self += "\(item)" ...


1

public class Agent { public static void main(String...args){ String input = "1 23 35 5d 8 0 f"; List<Integer> intList = new ArrayList<>(); for(String s: input.split(" ")) try{ intList.add(Integer.parseInt(s)); }catch(Exception ex){ continue; } ...


2

If you don't want to write your own "is this a number" checker, you can use Apache Commons: List<Integer> list = new ArrayList<>(); for (String num : "1 23 35 5d 8 0 f".split(" ")) { if (StringUtils.isNumeric(num)) { list.add(Integer.parseInt(num)); } } This has the advantage of not using exception ...


1

I would use a regex, the easy one would simply be to remove all non numeric/space characters, then simply split the string Edit: As pointed out in the comments this solution does not give the answer the questioner wanted. OK, an actual solution for this would be split the string on spaces then use a regex to insure all the digits in each string are ...


0

Messy, but can be done in one step by turning on the PCRE-regex flag of GNU grep grep -P '^(?=.*a.*)(?=.*e.*)(?=.*i.*)(?=.*o.*)(?=.*u.*)' file | wc -l


2

Nothing fancy. Just loop, and ignore exceptions: List<Integer> list = new ArrayList<>(); for (String num : "1 23 35 5d 8 0 f".split(" ")) { try { list.add(Integer.parseInt(num)); } catch (NumberFormatException e) {} } *Edit*: If invalid integers are common, you will get better performance using a manual check of the digits of ...


0

If you just add a flag after the character is ' ' so that your code wont think it's a new word then your problem should be solved. I guess the question is whether you want to print the empty space in your output.


2

If you want to handle only ASCII there is separate type for that: use std::ascii::{AsciiCast, OwnedAsciiCast}; fn main() { let mut ascii = "ascii string".to_string().into_ascii(); *ascii.get_mut(6) = 'S'.to_ascii(); println!("result = {}", ascii); } There are some missing pieces (like into_ascii for &str) but it does what you want. ...


1

You probably want something like: if (cmbConstructionQuality.Text == "Basic") { livingSpaceCostPerSF = 170; } and replace the = in your if statements with ==.


0

Try with cmbConstructionQuality.Text property Also write the if statements like this: if (cmbConstructionQuality.Text == "Basic") { livingSpaceCostPerSF = 170; } else if (cmbConstructionQuality.Text =="Standard") { livingSpaceCostPerSF = 185; } else if ...


2

You're printing out the random number. int cutelist = rand.nextInt(5); ... System.out.println("Here's a funny you can watch:" + cutelist); If you want to print out one of your string values (cute1, cute2, etc.) you should put them in an array or ArrayList and use the cutelist variable as an index. You want something along the lines of: int index = ...


3

Code: local input = "09705" local month, year, day = input:match("(%d%d)(%d)(%d%d)") print("month: "..month) print("year: "..year) print("day: "..day) Output: month: 09 year: 7 day: 05


1

The problem lies in the fact that your GenerateSaltValue method does not return string of hexademical numbers. It returns string of some random symbols, that may or usually may not be valid hexademical symbols - for me it created string of mostly Chinese hieroglyphs that for sure aren't parseable by Byte.Parse method. Also, your example pertains to ...


3

First of all, unless your compiler documentation explicitly lists void main() as a valid signature for the main function, use int main(void) instead. Under most circumstances, main is supposed to return a value to the runtime environment (even if it's just EXIT_SUCCESS). So let's talk about the declaration char arr [] ="hodaya"; "hodaya" is a string ...


1

Date.toISOString returns almost what you want. var d= new Date(); var s= d.toISOString(); /* returned value: (String) 2014-07-28T18:26:46.550Z */ You can tinker with the return in the same line of code- var d= new Date(); var s= d.toISOString().replace('T', ' ').slice(0, 16); /* returned value: (String) 2014-07-28 18:26 */ or even: (new ...


-1

Here's your answer - 100% efficient (ish). To pre-empt early criticism, copying is almost always faster than a chain of references. #include <iostream> #include <string> #include <type_traits> using namespace std; template<typename T1, int N1, typename T2, int N2> string glue_string(T1 (&src1)[N1], T2 (&src2)[N2]) { ...


2

#include <string> #include <iostream> #include <boost/range/adaptor/indexed.hpp> #include <boost/range/join.hpp> #include <boost/regex.hpp> const char s1[] = "abcd<ht"; const char s2[] = "ml>giuya"; int main() { auto glued = boost::range::join( s1 | boost::adaptors::indexed(0), s2 | ...


2

In general ? For any pair of characters ? It's impossible. A string is not an array. It may be implemented as an array, in some limited contexts. Rust supports Unicode, which brings some challenges: a Unicode code point might is an integral between 0 and 224 a grapheme may be composed of multiple Unicode code points In order to represent this, a Rust ...


-3

arr holds the address of the first element in the array(&arr[0]). Here you are always reading the address of the elements and not the value . arr[0] = 'a', arr[1] = 'b', arr[2] = 'c', arr[3] = 0; char *ptr = arr; *ptr++ = 'a', *ptr++ = 'b', *ptr++ = 'c', *ptr = 0;


1

This is the cause. From findstr /?: /N Prints the line number before each line that matches. Your command has it: 'findstr /n "^" "%textfile%"'


0

Removing leading spaces: {(+/×\' '=⍵)↓⍵} You can remove from the right by reversing the string and run the same code. Removing multiple spaces: {(~' '⍷⍵)/⍵}


1

As @Abhineet suggests "test and see for yourself". if (strcmp(str1,str2) != 0) and if ((str1[0] != str2[0]) && strcmp(str1,str2) !=0 ) are functionally the same when each is passed a C string. This, of course, is a requirement, else, why compare performance? C does not focus on specifying performance, so should this approach work faster with a ...


0

The trouble with strfind is that it returns a non-scalar result, which limits where you can use it. More straightfoward would be to use regexp like so, s = 'It-is true.'; if regexp(s, '^It-is') disp('s starts with "It-is"') end


0

If you want to know whether or not a particular item is repeated more than once, you can get the count of the item and check if it is bigger than 1: bool isRepeated = array.Count(x => x == item) > 1; Or, you can do it more efficiently with a HashSet: bool isRepeated = false; var set = new HashSet<int>(); foreach(var x in array) { if(x == ...


-1

Im sure there is a quicker way but this works! var results = from r in array where r == "A1" //or whatever value it is select r; if (results.ToArray().Length == 2) return true; else return false; Off the top of my head :)


0

So basically I did it like here: stackoverflow.com/a/2674354/2630520 int struct_to_string(const struct struct_type* struct_var, char* buf, const int len) { unsigned int length = 0; unsigned int i; length += snprintf(buf+length, len-length, "v0[%d]", struct_var->v0); length += other_struct_to_string(struct_var->sub, buf+length, ...


0

Look behind you! You can do it like: /(?<!\\)(<|>)/


0

You could try the below regex, (?<!\\)[<>] This would match < or > when it's not preceded by \ DEMO


0

You can use this negative lookbehind based regex: (?<!\\)[<>] Regex Demo


0

First assumption, the change pattern in code editor would always match with the one GUI uses? e.g., if the file body pattern is something like <some text .........>___ReplaceThisString__<some more text ..............> If it is like that, you could write a method on GUI save, which works something like most of the code repository, like SVN's ...



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