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64

Java 8 String Tokenizer -- not deprecated Java 7 String Tokenizer -- not deprecated Java 6 String Tokenizer -- not deprecated Java 5 String Tokenizer -- not deprecated If it is not marked as deprecated, it is not going away.


49

From the javadoc for StringTokenizer: StringTokenizer is a legacy class that is retained for compatibility reasons although its use is discouraged in new code. It is recommended that anyone seeking this functionality use the split method of String or the java.util.regex package instead. If you look at String.split() and compare it to StringTokenizer, ...


20

Don't use StringTokenizer; it's a legacy class. Use java.util.Scanner or simply String.split instead. String text = "Washington is the U.S Capital. Barack is living there."; String[] tokens = text.split("\\. "); for (String token : tokens) { System.out.println("[" + token + "]"); } This prints: [Washington is the U.S Capital] ...


18

Try this.. Date dt = new Date(date1); SimpleDateFormat sdf = new SimpleDateFormat("hh:mm aa"); String time1 = sdf.format(dt);


15

If you want the trailing empty strings to be kept, but you don't want to give a magic number for maximum, use a negative limit: line.split(",", -1) If line.equals("a,,c"), then line.split(",", -1)[1].isEmpty(); it's not null. This is because when "," is the delimiter, then ",," has an empty string between the two delimiters, not null. Example: Using the ...


14

You could use -[NSString componentsSeparatedByString:] or NSScanner to split the string, or use NSCalendar to extract the pieces of the date you're interested in.


13

The example below is based on your comments. It uses a List of keywords, which will be searched in a given String using word boundaries. It uses StringUtils from Apache Commons Lang to build the regular expression and print the matched groups. String text = "I will come and meet you at the woods 123woods and all the woods"; List<String> tokens = new ...


13

In order to add something, a private method can ALWAYS be changed safely, because you know for sure that is called only from the own class, no external classes are able to call a private method (they can't even see it). So having a private method is always good as you know there is no problem about changing it, even you can safely add more parameters to the ...


12

Are you only actually tokenizing on commas? If so, I'd write my own tokenizer - it may well end up being even more efficient than the more general purpose StringTokenizer which can look for multiple tokens, and you can make it behave however you'd like. For such a simple use case, it can be a simple implementation. If it would be useful, you could even ...


11

You can use Regex.Split with zero-width assertions. For example, the following will split on +-*/: Regex.Split(str, @"(?=[-+*/])|(?<=[-+*/])"); Effectively this says, "split at this point if it is followed by, or preceded by, any of -+*/. The matched string itself will be zero-length, so you won't lose any part of the input string.


10

After tinkering with the StringTokenizer class, I could not find a way to satisfy the requirements to return ["dog", "", "cat"]. Furthermore, the StringTokenizer class is left only for compatibility reasons, and the use of String.split is encouaged. From the API Specification for the StringTokenizer: StringTokenizer is a legacy class that is retained ...


10

Use the constructor with two arguments, where the second is the delimiters. StringTokenizer tokenizer = new StringTokenizer(yourString, "!*^/");


9

Take a look at the JavaDocs StringTokenizer is a legacy class that is retained for compatibility reasons although its use is discouraged in new code. It is recommended that anyone seeking this functionality use the split method of String or the java.util.regex package instead. The following example illustrates how the String.split method can ...


8

Well, I would rather use String.format(), or better MessageFormat.


8

StreamTokenizer is outdated, is is better to use Scanner, this is sample code for your problem: String s = "$23.24 word -123"; Scanner fi = new Scanner(s); //anything other than alphanumberic characters, //comma, dot or negative sign is skipped fi.useDelimiter("[^\\p{Alnum},\\.-]"); while (true) { if (fi.hasNextInt()) ...


8

Try string.split("\\|"); | is a special character and must be espaced with escape character \. In Java \ is written as \\. That is because String#split() takes regular expression as a parameter. In a regex special chars like ., |, (, etc must be escaped. Otherwise, Java will think you are actually using the special char (for example the | means OR).


8

StringTokenizer takes both the tokens as separate, and tokenizes on both of them. So, it is tokenizing on both // and /, and hence the result. I would rather prefer String#split over StringTokenizer. It's easier to use, and has more options. It can take Regex as parameter, and returns an array of tokens which you can use later on: - String mStr = ...


8

Each character in the delim argument is treated as a delimiter character. If you specify "$$" you specify $ twice (the second is ignored). To solve your problem you can use a Scanner: public static void main(String[] args) { String s = "/getCPage.asp?m=total&sub=$1$dga74$$/getEpage.asp?m=tatal&sub=0"; Scanner scanner = new Scanner(s); ...


8

Read javadoc: StringTokenizer. Every character in form:blocConfigurations:configurations:0:parametrage:options: is delimeter. 0 is also delimeter as this string contains 0. StringTokenizer is not right tool for this task. You can try with String.split: String[] tokens = iopp.split("form:blocConfigurations:configurations:0:parametrage:options:"); But be ...


7

StringTokenizer supports multiple delimiters that can be listed in a string as second parameter. StringTokenizer tok = new StringTokenizer(phoneNumber, "()- "); String a = tok.nextToken(); String b = tok.nextToken(); String c = tok.nextToken(); In your case, this will give a = 555, b = 555, c = 5555.


7

Thanks everyone for the answers! Gizmo's answer was definitely out of the box, and a great solution, but unfortunately not appropriate as the format can't be limited to what the Formatter class does in this case. Adam Paynter really got to the heart of the matter, with the right pattern. Peter Nix and Sean Bright had a great workaround to avoid all of the ...


7

TO search for partial field and exact match.You better define the fields as not analyzed.And then use wildcard query.[not analyzed will reduce cpu usage During indexing.] To mentions some field as not analyzed refer this To use wildcard query append * on both end of string you are searching for POST /my_index/my_type/_search { "query": { "wildcard": { ...


7

One problem you have is that when you find an index that's not in your array, you don't actually skip the token: if ( b == false ) { // don't actually skip the token !! counter++; continue a; } else { s2 = st2.nextToken(); raf2.writeBytes(s2); raf2.writeBytes(","); counter++; } This means your StringTokenizer ...


6

There -- the answer is in the snippet that you added. The integers listed show that the space after the word STRING is ASCII character 160, which is &nbsp;, instead of character 32, which is the ordinary space. Edit your original string, replacing the spaces within STRING TOKENIZER CLASS with actual spaces instead of shift-spaces. Just a side comment, ...


6

It looks like you're never actually reading the next line of the file. Change this bit: try { br = new BufferedReader(new FileReader("A1.input")); line = br.readLine(); while(line != null) { to this: try { br = new BufferedReader(new FileReader("A1.input")); while((line = br.readLine()) != null) {


6

Here is a jsfiddle example of what you asked: http://jsfiddle.net/ayezutov/BjXw5/1/ Basically, the code is very simple: var y = "This @is a #long $string. Alright, lets split this."; var regex = /[^\s]+/g; // This is "multiple not space characters, which should be searched not once in string" var match = y.match(regex); for (var i = 0; i<match.length; ...


6

The problemis that in Regex "." is a single character. Hence, you need to escape it using "\\." Similarly, you can use string.split("\\."); EDIT: split() method of the String class uses Pattern and Matcher internally which is normally the API used for Regex in Java. So there is no problem going with split.


6

From MSDN: To avoid ambiguous results when strings in separator have characters in common, the Split operation proceeds from the beginning to the end of the value of the instance, and matches the first element in separator that is equal to a delimiter in the instance. The order in which substrings are encountered in the instance takes precedence ...


6

Pass a -1 to split as the limit argument: String s = ",abd,def,,ghi,"; String[] tokens = s.split(",", -1); Then your result array will include any trailing empty strings. From the javadocs: If [the limit] is non-positive then the pattern will be applied as many times as possible and the array can have any length. If [the limit] is zero then the ...


6

You have to use a loop that checks if there are more tokens and in the loop gets the next token. Try this: StringTokenizer tokenizer = new StringTokenizer("one-two-three", "-"); while (tokenizer.hasMoreTokens()) { String token = tokenizer.nextToken(); // Do something with variable "token" }



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