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127

Yes, strlen() will be evaluated on each iteration. It's possible that, under ideal circumstances, the optimiser might be able to deduce that the value won't change, but I personally wouldn't rely on that. I'd do something like for (int i = 0, n = strlen(ss); i < n; ++i) or possibly for (int i = 0; ss[i]; ++i) as long as the string isn't going to ...


118

The PHP way of doing this is simple: $out = strlen($in) > 50 ? substr($in,0,50)."..." : $in; But you can achieve a much nicer effect with this CSS: .ellipsis { overflow: hidden; white-space: nowrap; text-overflow: ellipsis; } Now, assuming the element has a fixed width, the browser will automatically break off and add the ... for you.


56

Let's write char c[] = "abc\012\0x34"; with single characters: char c[] = { 'a', 'b', 'c', '\012', '\0', 'x', '3', '4', '\0' }; The first \0 you see is the start of an octal escape sequence \012 that extends over the following octal digits. Octal escape sequences are specified in section 6.4.4.4 of the standard (N1570 draft): octal-escape-sequence:...


47

You can achieve the desired trim in this way too: mb_strimwidth("Hello World", 0, 10, "..."); Where: Hello World: the string to trim. 0: number of characters from the beginning of the string. 10: the length of the trimmed string. ...: an added string at the end of the trimmed string. This will return Hello W.... Notice that 10 is the length of the ...


24

sizeof and strlen() do different things. In this case, your declaration char string[] = "october"; is the same as char string[8] = "october"; so the compiler can tell that the size of string is 8. It does this at compilation time. However, strlen() counts the number of characters in the string at run time. So, after you call strcpy(), string now ...


22

for (int i=0;i<strlen(x);i++) This code is calling strlen(x) every iteration. So if x is length 100, strlen(x) will be called 100 times. This is very expensive. Also, strlen(x) is also iterating over x every time in the same way that your for loop does. This makes it O(n^2) complexity. for (int i=0;x[i]!='\0';i++) This code calls no functions, so ...


20

You should be looking in glibc, not GCC -- it seems to be defined in strlen.c -- here's a link to strlen.c for glibc version 2.7... And here is a link to the glibc SVN repository online for strlen.c. The reason you should be looking at glibc and not gcc is: The GNU C library is used as the C library in the GNU system and most systems with the Linux ...


19

It doesn't use the preprocessor, but sizeof is resolved at compile time. If your string is in an array, you can use that to determine its length at compile time: static const char string[] = "bob"; #define STRLEN(s) (sizeof(s)/sizeof(s[0])) Keep in mind the fact that STRLEN above will include the null terminator, unlike strlen().


19

Did you check the man page? strlen(3) returns size_t. Use %zu to print it. As mentioned in the comments below, clang is sometimes helpful with finding better error messages. clang's warning for exactly this case is pretty great, in fact: example.c:6:14: warning: format specifies type 'unsigned int' but the argument has type 'size_t' (aka 'unsigned ...


18

The rational behind it is simple -- how can you check the length of something that does not exist? Also, unlike "managed languages" there is no expectations the run time system will handle invalid data or data structures correctly. (This type of issue is exactly why more "modern" languages are more popular for non-computation or less performant requiring ...


17

Use sizeof(). e.g. sizeof("blah") will evaluate to 5 at compile-time (5, not 4, because the string literal always includes an implicit null-termination character).


16

The sizeof operator does not give you the length of a string but instead the size of the type of it's operand. Since in your code the operand is an array, sizeof is giving you the size of the array including both null characters. If it were like this const char *string = "This is a large text\0This is another string"; printf("%zu %zu\n", strlen(string), ...


15

how about using mb_strlen() ? http://lt.php.net/manual/en/function.mb-strlen.php But if you need to use strlen, its possible to configure your webserver by setting mbstring.func_overload directive to 2, so it will automatically replace using of strlen to mb_strlen in your scripts.


15

Use wordwrap() to truncate the string without breaking words if the string is longer than 50 characters, and just add ... at the end: $str = $input; if( strlen( $input) > 50) { $str = explode( "\n", wordwrap( $input, 50)); $str = $str[0] . '...'; } echo $str; Otherwise, using solutions that do substr( $input, 0, 50); will break words.


15

Your while loop should not be comparing against '0'. '0' (ascii) is value 48! Strings don't end with 48. Strings end with 0. You should be doing: while(length[string] != 0) (and all the other answers and comments about other problems in your code are also accurate)


15

I don't think you can ever depend on an optimization happening. Why not do it like this, if you really want to avoid an extra variable: void send_str(const char *data) { for(size_t i = strlen(data); i != 0; --i) send_byte(*data++); } Or, less silly, and more like an actual production-quality C program: void send_str(const char *data) { while(*...


14

This is most likely related to this bugreport: https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=518247 As Paul already suggested, strlen() on intel platforms optionally uses SSE optimization to speed up strlen and friends. This speed up involve safe reads behind the allocated blocks, something older versions of valgrind did not understand yet. So upgrade your ...


14

Yes, every time you use the loop. Then it will every time calculate the length of the string. so use it like this: char str[30]; for ( int i = 0; str[i] != '\0'; i++) { //Something; } In the above code str[i] only verifies one particular character in the string at location i each time the loop starts a cycle, thus it will take less memory and is more ...


14

You're probably freeing memory the function doesn't own. For example: strlen("42"); would crash because "42" is a string literal - you can't modify it. Note that '0' is not the terminating character for a string, but the actual '0' character. Use either '\0' or 0. Remove the free and it should work. I'd also go with the more idiomatic string[length],...


13

You are trying to use strlen function, which is declared in string.h (or, as a member of namespace std in cstring). So, in order to use strlen you should include one of those two headers. The #include <string> variant does not work simply because string is a completely unrelated C++-specific header file which has absolutely nothing to do with C ...


13

use char_traits<char16_t>::length(your_pointer) see 21.2.3.2 struct char_traits<char16_t> and table 62 of the C++11-Std.


13

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) argv is an array of pointers to char (i.e. array of strings). The length of this array is stored in argc argument. strlen is meant to be used to retrieve the length of the single string that must be null-terminated else the behavior is undefined.


12

The portion of the language standard that defines the string handling library states that, unless specified otherwise for the specific function, any pointer arguments must have valid values. The philosphy behind the design of the C standard library is that the programmer is ultimately in the best position to know whether a run-time check really needs to ...


12

You can try empty. if (!empty($_GET['variable'])) { // Do something. } On the plus side, it will also check if the variable is set or not, i.e., there is no need to call isset seperately. There is some confusion regarding not calling isset. From the documentation. A variable is considered empty if it does not exist or if its value equals FALSE. ...


11

y is not null-terminated. strlen() counts characters until it hits a null character. Yours happened to find one after 6, but it could be any number. Try this: char y[] = {'t','e','s','t', '\0'}; Here's what an implementation of strlen() might look like (off the top of my head -- don't have my K&R book handy, but I believe there's an implementation ...


11

You are telling the user agent to expect strlen($data) and then actually sending $header."\n".$data! Try something like this at the end of your code... $output=$header."\n".$data; // create table header showing to download a xls (excel) file header("Content-type: application/octet-stream"); header("Content-Disposition: attachment; filename=$...


11

The size of a char* is just sizeof(char*). What you seem to be after is the length of a null terminated string, which you get from the strlen function: const char* blob = "Hello there"; size_t length = strlen(blob);


11

Use mb_strlen Returns the number of characters in string str having character encoding (the second parameter) encoding. A multi-byte character is counted as 1. Since your 3 characters are all multi-byte, you get 6 returned with strlen, but this returns 3 as expected. echo mb_strlen($string,'utf-8'); Fiddle Note It's important not to underestimate ...


10

Yes, there is an important difference. The == operator does type conversion, so it's not always going to do what you expect. For example, (0 == "") returns true. So you're making an assumption that $str is actually a string. If you're sure this is the case, or if you don't care about the conversions, then it's fine. Otherwise you should use ===, and take ...


10

The first code checks length of x in every iteration of i and it takes O(n) to find the last 0, so it takes O(n^2), the second case is O(n)



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