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Let me give you a simple example: if ( a + b ) C/C+= allows an implicit conversion from float to int to Boolean. A strongly-typed language would not allow such an implicit conversion.


0

In contrast, a language is weakly-typed if type-confusion can occur silently (undetected), and eventually cause errors that are difficult to localize. Well, that can happen in C++, for example: #define _USE_MATH_DEFINES #include <iostream> #include <cmath> #include <limits> void f(char n) { std::cout << "f(char)\n"; } void ...


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"weakly typed" is a quite subjective term. I prefer the terms "strictly typed" and "statically typed" vs. "loosely typed" and "dynamically typed", because they are more objective and more precise words. From what I can tell, people generally use "weakly typed" as a diminutive-pejorative term which means "I don't like the notion of types in this language". ...


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That paper first claims: In contrast, a language is weakly-typed if type-confusion can occur silently (undetected), and eventually cause errors that are difficult to localize. And then claims: Also, C and C++ are considered weakly typed since, due to type-casting, one can interpret a field of a structure that was an integer as a pointer. This ...



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