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Dates in the m/d/y or d-m-y formats are disambiguated by looking at the separator between the various components: if the separator is a slash (/), then the American m/d/y is assumed; whereas if the separator is a dash (-) or a dot (.), then the European d-m-y format is assumed. To avoid potential ambiguity, it's best to use ISO 8601 (YYYY-MM-DD) ...


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Basic PHP: '-quoted strings do NOT interpolate variables: if(strtotime('$orderdate') ^----------^ You're passing the literal characters $, o, r, d, etc... to strtotime(), which is of course not a valid date. So it'll return boolean false, which will be converted to integer 0 for the purposes of your <= comparison. For a basic "pass a ...


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Aside from your question, you need to store datetime data in a datetime column. Mysql has specific functions and formatting for this reason. But, in order to store it will need to be in Y-m-d H:i:s format. Doing this will save you big hassles down the road. In regards to your question, you can use PHP's DateTime class if you are using PHP version 5.2+. ...


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If you're trying to get a timestamp of today at 8pm, it's actually much more simple than using date since you can use relative times in a strtotime: $curtime = strtotime('today 8pm'); If you test this with date: echo date('Y-m-d H:i:s', $curtime); // Returns 2014-12-17 20:00:00 Here's a whole writeup on relative date formats that explains how you can ...


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Because date("i") only shows minutes from 0 to 59. PHP date manual A possible solution: $totaltime = (strtotime($endtime) - strtotime($starttime)) / 60;


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Your return value is formatted as a new time output (because of the date() function) As you are only requesting the number of minutes in the formatted time, it's only returning that part. If you want to see the hours and minutes, output using h: $totaltime = date("H:i",strtotime($endtime) - strtotime($starttime)); This will return "01:06". If you need ...


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You are adding <br> to your time, just remove it or add it later. <?php $t1= $_POST['usr_time1']; $t2= $_POST['usr_time2']; echo $t1."<br>"; echo $t2."<br>"; echo $timestamp = strtotime($t1);


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This should work for you: (For the first date you have to change / to - so you can use date() and you can change the order of d/m/Y to Y-m-d, after that it's a simple concatenation with the time at the end) <?php $campaign_date = "16/12/2014"; //Data from DB $campaign_time = "18:00"; //Data from DB echo $new_datetime = date("Y-m-d", ...


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Try it,i tested it myself. $db_date = date("Y-m-d",strtotime($db_date)); $db_time = date("h:i:s",strtotime($db_time)); echo $db_date.'T'.$db_time;


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I'm not sure if I understood, but. If you have a string date, as in your example, you could transform it in a Date Object, than you can format as you want. See an example: $date = '2014-12-17'; $dateObj = date_create($date); echo date_format($dateObj, 'Y-m-d'); // will show 2014-12-17 echo date_format($dateObj, 'd-m-Y'); // will show 17-12-2014 See if ...


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If posted format is in m-d-Y, then you cannot convert it to unix timestamp directly with strtotime() function, because it will return false. If you need to use strtotime() then change the input format to m/d/Y by simple str_replace(). On the other hand, you could use DateTime class: $dt = DateTime::createFromFormat('!m-d-Y', $submission_date); echo ...


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you are also adding <br> to $t1


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You are using system time with this function. The users of your web application will be from different locations and from different time zones. Because of that, this may lead to wrong output for the users who are not in the same time zone of the server. To get the time zone you have to make use of client side programming (javascripts). According to the ...


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for($i=0; $i<=10;$i++) { $temp = strtotime("+$i day"); $dates=date("Y-m-d", $temp ); $tmp_array[$i]=$dates; } print_r($tmp_array); //output Array ( [0] => 2014-12-03 [1] => 2014-12-04 [2] => 2014-12-05 [3] => 2014-12-06 [4] => 2014-12-07 [5] => 2014-12-08 [6] => 2014-12-09 [7] => ...


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This should work for you: for($i = 0; $i <= 10; $i++) $dates[] = date("Y-m-d", strtotime( "+$i days")); echo "<pre>"; print_r($dates); Output: Array ( [0] => 2014-12-03 [1] => 2014-12-04 [2] => 2014-12-05 [3] => 2014-12-06 [4] => 2014-12-07 [5] => 2014-12-08 [6] => 2014-12-09 [7] => ...


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I tested it in phpFiddle It works if you specify minutes (Based on this code) $compare_date = date('Y-m-d H:i',strtotime('2014-12-16 13'.'+2 month')); You said H:i so if you use: $compare_date = date('Y-m-d H:i',strtotime('2014-12-16 13:00'.'+2 month'));//Note the :00 it works for me. EDIT1: Without H:i $compare_date = ...


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You're using strtotime wrong. When using relative time (+2 month) you should provide a timestamp as second parameter (current timestamp is the default value). $compare_date = date('Y-m-d H:i',strtotime('+2 month', strtotime('2014-12-16 13:00')));



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