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0

Looks like it was always working! Members seem to only be recommended if they're within a function - for example: sDINVoltage voltages_; voltages_. // No recommendation void test_func(void) { sDINVoltage voltages; voltages.// Will get recommendation here } I was trying to get recommendations outside of a function. :) If someone knows why this ...


2

EDIT: Since C99 C has variable-length arrays so you probably don't need dynamic memory allocation. What you can do is: int i; for(i = 5; i <= 10; ++i) { struct point p[i]; /* Do something with p */ } Arrays have elements indexed from 0 to size-1 so in this case the first element is p[0] and the last is p[i-1]. If n is not constant at ...


2

It sounds like you're looking for an array: struct point a[n]; Then access the elements as a[0], a[1], .... a[n-1]. If n is too large, you may need to allocate dynamically with malloc The down-side is that you must remember to de-allocate with free.


2

Yes there is, suppose N is a constant, then struct point p[N]; And then pn would be p[n - 1] and then you can access each element from 0 to N - 1. And this is called and Array.


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struct point *p = malloc(sizeof(strutc point) * n); Use malloc() to allocate memory dynamically so you can specify size as shown above. Once the allocated memory is used you need to free it using free(p)


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Before entering the opening { of your constructor, all of your members are already initialised. That includes the _floatParameters array and all of its elements. When you then do... _floatParameters[FloatParameter::CHIP_CLOCK_RATE_0](2.0, 2.0, 1.0, FloatParameter::CHIP_CLOCK_RATE_0, AccessModes::WRITE); ...this is seen as attempting to call ...


1

You're calling _floatParameters[FloatParameter::CHIP_CLOCK_RATE_0](...) as if you had an array of functions, and you're calling one of its items. Even though arrays of functions do exist in C++, it doesn't seem to be what you tried to achieve. Simply, you cannot call constructor like that. Here's a correct example: ...


0

Ok, based on the fact that I can't do a copy of the data, having a return type of Response will not work in my situation. It seems that I have two choices: int getResponse( const std::string &url, shared_ptr<Response> ) or unique_ptr<Response> getResponse( const std::string &url ) So it becomes in code: if( !getResponse( ...


1

It looks like Thrust may be useful for you, so if your use case fits that I would recommend it. Your code uses the cuda api alright, except that the return type of VectorToDevice should be devArr. If the following is what you want to do, you shall pass the whole devArr struct as value to a certain kernel function. Then you can use the device pointer. ...


1

What you need is: std::istream& operator >> (std::istream& is, employee& e) { is >> e.first_name; is >> e.last_name; // Read the pay kind as an integer. // Check to make sure that the value is acceptable. int payKind; is >> payKind; if (payKind == pay_type::hourly || payKind == ...


0

You are probably dereferencing a NULL pointer, try this if (e != NULL) { Question *question; question = e->questions[i]; if (question != NULL) printf("%s\n", question->qText); }


0

I found the solution to my problem. When it was a struct, everytime I was passing around variables they were copies instead of references, so every new data structure composed of CellInfo I created was brand new. When changing to class, instead of copies they were references, and at some points of my code this caused several unwanted side effects that ended ...


0

If I understand you, you want to make an array that contains elements of type foo. The following code does that: (001) int number = 10, ndx; (002) (003) typedef struct _foo (004) { (005) int member1; (006) int member2; (007) } foo, *pfoo; (008) (009) pfoo ptr = malloc(number * sizeof(foo)); ...


0

Here's a running example of what you want to achieve - you can play around with it on ideone #include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> typedef struct { int haz; int cheez; } foo; typedef struct { foo* p; } bar; int main(void) { // your code goes here bar mybar; bar *mybar_ptr; foo* myfoo_array = malloc(10*sizeof ...


0

You have type errors in your code. Right now, your code will work in "1d" because all your functions accepts only ints, which are "1d". But now with your "2d" version you need to change many of your types to bingo. Make these changes, Line 12: void swap(int *a, int *b) { to void swap(bingo *a, bingo *b) { Line 13: int temp = *a; to bingo temp = *a; Line ...


2

Because ListNode s1 = { a, NULL }; is a local variable, it exists within the stack frame of the newList() function, and when the function returns it no longer exists, but yet you have a pointer to it in your struct. Try this ListNode *s1 = malloc(sizeof(ListNode)); if (s1 == NULL) handleThisErrorAndDoNotContinuePlease(); s1->letter = a; ...


1

The = operator can not be overloaded. See Overloadable Operators. The = operator always assigns the value on the right hand side to the variable on the left hand side. For a value type (struct), it means that the entire value is copied into the variable. For a type like Int32, there are built in instructions in the processor that can do that copying. For ...


0

A slightly difference answer to why you should return by value here is the contents of your structs. If the contents of your objects are cheap to move then you should return by value. Move semantics will kick-in automatically because the compiler knows the local scope object you are returning is about to be destroyed. If your object is not cheap move/copy, ...


0

np.dtype can perform the same sort of repacking np.array(struct.unpack('II', struct.pack('d', double(np.pi))), dtype='uint') # array([1413754136, 1074340347], dtype=uint32) dt1 = np.dtype((double, {'a':(np.uint32,0),'b':(np.uint32,4)})) np.array([np.pi], dtype=dt1)[['a','b']] # array([(1413754136L, 1074340347L)], dtype=[('a', '<u4'), ('b', '<u4')])


0

First things first, Galik's answer is right, just return by value. Then both your approaches are wrong, clearly. You have an object in the stack, that object's lifetime is perfectly managed by the compiler and you cannot delete the object (or use a smart pointer to delete it). If you have some special interest in not returning by value (maybe the object is ...


7

Modern compilers are very good at optimizing how values are returned from functions so it is common to return by value when that makes sense: // Just return by value Response getResponse(const std::string& url) { Response r; // ... return r; }


1

Your function should return a pointer struct timeStamp *timeManipulate(struct tm *timeinfo) /* ^ make the function return a struct tiemStamp pointer */ and the return value should be return tS; Also, your if (ts == NULL) perror("Allocation Error"); will still dereference the NULL pointer, it should be something like if (ts == ...


0

In the end I used a T4 template. I made a template of a a managed C++ struct and parsed the native struct line be line and got the info needed about members and such and then inserted it to the T4 template.


3

First, *[]Home is really wasteful. A slice is a three worded struct under the hood, one of them being itself a pointer to an array. You are introducing a double indirection there. This article on data structures in Go is very useful. Now, because of this indirection, you need to put the dereference operator * in every pointer-to-slice expression. Like this: ...


0

unpack creates a tuple, which you need to either unpack or index to get individual values, even if you are only unpacking a single value. You can use a single call to unpack to get both values at the same time. tmp = struct.pack('<d',double(datatobeconverted)) data0, data1 = struct.unpack('<II',tmp) dataout0, dataout1 = np.uint32(data0), ...


1

That's exactly how you do it. The thing which confused me and to be aware of here is that the pointer contains an address on the device memory, thus it's only valid in a device function. In host code it points to the wrong data.


1

I'd recommend one correction, instead of this scanf("%s",name); try with this scanf("%4s",name); /* ^ should be sizeof(name) - 1 */ so you prevent overflowing name, and to store the value in the struct instead of data->userName = name; use strcpy(data->userName, name); also, why are you doing this (*data).userAge = age; use ...


1

Yes, it is possible. Introduction Since you want to access and modify the value of a variable (or field), you need to use the reflect.Value type instead of reflect.Type. You can acquire it with reflect.ValueOf(). Also in order to modify it with reflection, you need to pass the address (a pointer) of the struct or value you want to modify (else you could ...


1

You're just slicing tmp wrong. >>> dataout0 = np.uint32(struct.unpack('<I',tmp[0:3])) Traceback (most recent call last): File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module> struct.error: unpack requires a string argument of length 4 >>> The error message is pretty clear: the string arg you're passing is not "of length 4". Python ...


0

There are two ways to get it compiling: 1)You have defined a struct inside a class in private scope....That hides it from the rest of the world. But as juanchopanza pointed out, you need to specify the scope. 2)Another way to do it would be to take the definition of node outside the class and it should work without changing the function prototype. First ...


1

This is because the userName member of your struct is only a pointer. I.e. the address of another variable somewhere in memory. When you read the user's input into the name variable in the main routine you over write whatever used to be in that array. Calling addUserInToList changes the userName pointer in the selected struct to be the address of the name ...


1

Change the function addUserInToList() as below void addUserInToList(User* db, int age, char* name) { db->userAge = age; db->userName = malloc(strlen(name) + 1); strcpy(db->username, name); } What you were trying to do was just point the db's username for all user to a single memory location pointed by char name[5] ; Hence all the ...


3

nodePtr is defined in List, so you need the right scope: List::nodePtr List::GetHead() ^^^^^^


4

corrected If the structure is an aggregate, the 2 definitions perform the same thing. From the C++11 standard (N3337): 8.5.1/7 If there are fewer initializer-clauses in the list than there are members in the aggregate, then each member not explicitly initialized shall be initialized from its brace-or-equal-initializer or, if there is no brace-or-equal- ...


4

It really depends on the nature of the struct. If it is an aggregate, the two are largely equivalent. However, the first one is general in that it simply value-initializes the struct. The second one requires that the struct's first member be initializable with 0, and initializes the rest of elements as if they were each initialized by an empty initializer ...


0

I think Whilom Chime gave a pretty adequete answer, as did Mr. Zebra. Another way to do it would be like so; e->title = malloc(sizeof(char *)); if(e->title != NULL) strcpy(e->title, word); However, I've found when working with really large data sets (I had to put ~3M words into a 2-3-4 tree a couple days ago), e->title = strdup(word); is ...


1

Enumerate the datatypes you want to store typedef enum type{ equipment, member,loan,ets} type; typedef struct lnk_lst { type data_type; void* data; struct lnk_lst* next; } lnk_lst ; Initilization will be like equipment_data e1; lnk_lst* node=(lnk_lst*)malloc(sizeof(lnk_lst)); node->data_type=equipment; //if created dynamically ...


0

Surely you simply meant: e->title = strdup(name); ... free(e->title); strdup() will count the string pointed to by 'name', allocate space for a copy (including the null terminator) and copy the data in a sensible, architecture aligned way (usually.)`


2

sizeof(strlen(name)+1) is not correct, this gives you the size of the result of that calculation, i.e. sizeof(int). Because you have allocated the wrong size you are writing past the end of the buffer. This is corrupting data and causing free() to fail. What you mean to do is: sizeof(char) * (strlen(name) + 1) In C, sizeof(char) is guaranteed to be ...


1

you can place the variable for the structure ets in the struct node. struct node { void *data; struct ets *var; struct node *next; }; Now you can access the all structures.


1

You should probably create a node that has points to the various structs. struct node { struct equipment_data *eq_data; // This pointers to equipment struct struct member_data * me_data; // ...... struct load_data * lo_data; // ..... unsigned equip_count; unsigned member_count; unsigned loan_count; struct node* next_node; // this points to the next node in ...


2

I would make structures for the types that you need to support, and then a union with a type indicator in the linked list node: typedef struct { int a, b, c; } Type1; typedef struct { char buf[80]; } Type2; typedef struct { int a; float b; } Type3; typedef union { Type1 t1, Type2 t2, Type3 t3; } Anytype; typedef struct node { int ...


0

I am not sure that the Unmanaged Code will be GC'ed. However, I follow the tutorial: link and what I am missing in my code is just to forget free the allocated memory for the next use. private void DoJob(IntPtr wParam) { if (wParam != IntPtr.Zero) { Type type = typeof(MyData); MyData md = (MyData)Marshal.PtrToStructure(p,type); ...


0

Including sys/types.h fixed the issue.


0

With sbrk(0) you allocate 0 bytes of memory. I think that what you really want is bloo *foo = (bloo*) sbrk(sizeof(struct blah)); Also note that the man page for sbrk says: Avoid using brk() and sbrk(): the malloc(3) memory allocation package is the portable and comfortable way of allocating memory. Expect your program/implementation to behave ...


1

I think you should change this ItemT item = *((stackPtr->items)); to ItemT item = stackPtr->items[stackPtr->top]; and remove this --(stackPtr->items);


0

As it turns out, the MATLAB cell array (fieldE) was imported as a nested list. Using unlist takes care of the problem: data = lapply(data, unlist, use.names=FALSE) df <- as.data.frame(data) # now has correct number of obs and vars Thanks @koekenbakker for the critical pointer to this!


3

Without a complete code example and a clear description of what you are actually trying to achieve here, it's impossible to know for sure what the best answer. That said, frankly, the whole scheme seems nuts to me. IntPtr? Seriously? I don't see anything in your question that describes a problem that can't be accomplished more easily simply by wrapping the ...


0

While Creating class use properties public class Players { public int number{get;set;} public string name{get;set;} public int money{get;set;} public int position { get; set; } public bool inGame { get; set; } public string getNames(){ return name; } } and while creating its objects public Players[] p = new Players[5]; ...


2

Once you have a List<Players>, you need to actually add your intances to the list.Then you can index as you expect: private List<Players> allPlayers = new List<Players>(); public void setNames() { Players player1 = new Players(); player1.name= textBox1.Text; Players player2 = new Players(); player2.name = textBox2.Text; ...



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