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18

Here's a description of each one followed by with real world sample. Dummy - just bogus values to satisfy the API. Example: If you're testing a method of a class which requires many mandatory parameters in a constructor which have no effect on your test, then you may create dummy objects for the purpose of creating new instances of a class. Fake - ...


12

You're running up against React's auto-binding feature, which caches the .bind(this) which is wrapped around your class methods. You can get your code to work by stubbing the cached version of the method in React's __reactAutoBindMap: var Comp = React.createClass({ displayName: "Comp", plop: function() { console.log("plop"); }, render: ...


8

RSpec 3 syntax: allow(@family).to receive(:location).and_return("abcdefg", "bcdefgh")


6

This is not a classic scenario, since not many methods would call two methods sequentially, and I guess thats why it isn't supported. But, be calm, the solution is easy: var subject = { method: function(one, two) {} }; var stub = sinon.stub(subject, 'method', function(one, two) { one(); two(); }); subject.method( function() { ...


6

Your expectation should be declared before the code you're testing. Using expect(...).to receive(...) basically means "this message should be received between now and the end of this spec". Because the expectation is the last line of your spec, it fails. Try moving it before and you should be good to go: it 'only sends once per user' do ...


5

Attention: I am going to oversimplify and maybe even slightly falsify in the upcoming paragraphs. For more detailed info see Martin Fowler's website. A mock is a dummy class replacing a real one, returning something like null or 0 for each method call. You use a mock if you need a dummy instance of a complex class which would otherwise use external ...


5

If you are doing unit testing of your controller you can simply stub your current_user in a before block, like this: let(:user) { ... } # RSpec version <= 2 syntax: before { controller.stub(:current_user) { user } } # RSpec version >= 3 syntax: before { allow(controller).to receive(:current_user) { user } } If you are doing feature or request ...


5

You can overwrite some previous mocking by: expect(RestClient).to receive(:delete).and_call_original Or if it is wasn't any kind of expectation, just a simple stub: allow(RestClient).to receive(:delete).and_call_original Remember there exists also expect_any_instance_of and allow_any_instance_of.


3

Why does rmiregistry need stub class file? Because it's just another RMI server and obeys the same semantics as other RMI servers and clients. What is that unmarshalling error that I see? It is exactly the same exception that any other RMI client would get if it passed a parameter to a server that didn't have that class available to it. Even ...


3

Which test framework are you using? If you use jasmine, I've found jasmine-react to be a useful library for spying on React methods as well as replacing Components with test stubs. In this case, you can spy on your method easily outside component definition. //Component Definition var Comp = React.createClass({ displayName: "Comp", plop: ...


3

NSDate has to important characteristics: It is a class cluster It is immutable In such a case, +alloc returns only a placeholder and you send -init… to that placeholder (of class __NSPlaceholderDate). Replacing -init (NSDate) has no effect, if -init (__NSPlaceholderDate or NSWhatever is implemented.) This is, because +alloc cannot decide which (private) ...


3

Reading all the explanations above, let me try to condense: Stub: a dummy piece of code that lets the test run, but you don't care what happens to it. Mock: a dummy piece of code, that you VERIFY is called correctly as part of the test.


3

This code is misusing the Mockito API : when(layer.createNewPlaylist("playlist1", Mockito.any(UUID.class))) .thenReturn(new OnDemandPlaylist("playlist1", "", AdditionalAnswers.returnsArgAt(1))); ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ this is wrong AdditionalAnswers.returnsArgAt(1) ...


3

I expect that it means add the following code to the class: public static void main(String[] args) {} It is a stub because it doesn't really do anything, but it allows you to use the class as the entry point to your application. You can subsequently add statements to your code which add useful behaviour.


3

Look at the amount of distinct values (toShuffle.Distinct().Count()) and verify is that is the same as the initial amount. I would also advise you to use the proper assertion methods instead of using Assert.IsTrue() everywhere.


3

Using FluentAssertions (which I highly recommend), you can do: toShuffle.Should().OnlyHaveUniqueItems(); But, I'd actually rewrite your test like this: //Arrange var original = new List<int>{1001,1002,1003,1004,1005,1006,1007,1008,1009,1010}; //Act var shuffled = Shared_Components.SharedComponents.Shuffle(original , 10); //Assert ...


2

Layman's terms, it's dummy data (or fake data, test data...etc.) that you can use to test or develop your code against until you (or the other party) is ready to present/receive real data. It's a programmer's "Lorem Ipsum". Employee database not ready? Make up a simple one with Jane Doe, John Doe...etc. API not ready? Make up a fake one by creating a static ...


2

You can use the patch decorator to replace a constant. e.g.: >>> import mock >>> class Foo(object): ... bar = 1000000 ... >>> with mock.patch.object(Foo, 'bar', 10): ... print(Foo.bar) ... 10 >>> print(Foo.bar) 1000000 Specifically, look at the documentation for the new keyword argument to patch (or any of the ...


2

If you need mock dates e.g. in your tests, consider instantiating the NSDate objects with the Factory pattern and replacing the factory for production or tests. This way only your own classes end up with the mock dates and you don't have to worry about accidentally replacing methods that may be used by Apple's frameworks.


2

AFAIK you can't do that with PHPUnit native mocks. There is a mocking library called Mockery that can do that: http://docs.mockery.io/en/latest/reference/expectations.html look for the passthru() method. That said, it's not very usual that you need to call the real method from a mock. Can you explain a real case? You mock methods so you can take control ...


2

Currently, you're stubbing the current_user method for your controller variable. In your new syntax example, you've put the stub on the user double object. Without knowing more about build_stubbed, I would expect it to look like: allow(controller).to receive(:current_user).and_return build_stubbed(:user)


2

In simple terms: Mock: You mock a type and on the fly you get an object created. Methods in this mock object returns the default values of return type. Stub: You create a stub class where methods are redefined with definition as per your requirement. Ex: In real object method you call and external api and return the username against and id. In stubbed ...


2

in Ruby super looks like a method, but it's actually a keyword with special behavior (for example, super and super() do different things, unlike every other Ruby method), and you can't stub it. What you really want to do is stub the method that super invokes, which in this case is ImportBackend#import_from_file. Since it's a mixin from a module (and not a ...


2

If I understand your question right, you want to connect to multiple web services that expose the same WSDL but are located at different addresses and your client contains only the address of the service used to generate it? In that case have a look at this post: Changing WSDL url (endpoint) in JAX-WS client.


2

The easiest way of mocking (stubbing) ThirdPartyClass, as has been mentioned, would be if that class implements an interface, and that interface is the complete interface your ClassToTest uses. Then you could write a MockThirdParty class that implements ThirdPartyInterface. But I guess you can not do that. Another option is to hide the ThirdPartyClass ...


2

Is a reference variable to an Object residing in the same JVM. The key point is that this object has the ability to communicate with a remote object residing in another JVM. It's a Proxy that encapsulates the remote method invocation details, which allows you to invoke methods in a remote object as if it was residing in the same JVM.


2

The point in mocking is not to mock the objects you are going to test but to mock those objects which the object under test depends on, like: TestRunner -> ObjectUnderTest -> MockedObject1..n Here you test the behavior of ObjectUnderTest which needs some other objects to work. The latter objects are not subject to the current test, and so are mocked for ...


2

Go to the Java Build Path in the project properties. Remove the existing JRE System Library Then Add it again i.e. Add Library-->JRE Lib--select jre--->Finish. Lastly select order and export tab select JRE Lib and move on top. That's it.


2

Calendar calendar = Calendar.getInstance(); This is going to produce a calendar object using the host computer's default timezone. <ArrivalDate>2015-02-02T23:00:00.244Z</ArrivalDate> This time is in UTC (the "Z" at the end means "Zulu", aka UTC). You've indicated the computer is using the time zone for Paris, which is one hour ahead of UTC. ...


2

Note that Kernel is a module which is included into every ruby Object. And Kernel#system is an instance method (not a class method). One solution (although discouraged by rspec maintainers) is to use "Any instance": it "runs 'bundle exec rspec spec'" do expect_any_instance_of(Kernel).to receive(:system).with "bundle exec rspec spec" ...



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