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53

The DOT user manual gives the following example of a graph with clusters with edges between clusters digraph G { compound=true; subgraph cluster0 { a -> b; a -> c; b -> d; c -> d; } subgraph cluster1 { e -> g; e -> f; } b -> f [lhead=cluster1]; d -> e; c -> g [ltail=cluster0,lhead=cluster1]; ...


24

I think what you are looking for is generally called a Flood Fill. It is up to you whether you traverse the graph through a BFS or a DFS. Basically you take an unlabeled (AKA uncoloured) node and assign a new label to it. You assign the same label to all nodes adjacent to that one, and so on to all nodes that are reachable from that node. When no more ...


24

For ease of reference the solution described in HighPerformanceMark's answer, applied directly to the original question, looks like this: digraph G { graph [fontsize=10 fontname="Verdana" compound=true]; node [shape=record fontsize=10 fontname="Verdana"]; subgraph cluster_0 { node [style=filled]; "Item 1" "Item 2"; ...


10

Reproducing particulr graph layouts usually can be achieved with: Invisible nodes and edges rank constraints Here's how I reproduced your graph - or at least a part of it: digraph g { rankdir="LR"; node[shape = circle, fontsize=14]; fontsize=18; labeljust="l"; edge[style=invis, fontsize=12]; { rank=same; 0 [style = ...


10

This is known as the clique problem; it's hard and is in NP-complete in general, and yes there are many algorithms to do this. If the graph has additional properties (e.g. it's bipartite), then the problem becomes considerably easier and is solvable in polynomial time, but otherwise it's very hard, and is completely solvable only for small graphs. From ...


10

A maximal induced subgraph where the vertices have minimum degree k is called a k-core. You can find the k-cores just by repeatedly removing any vertices with degree less than k. In practice, you first evaluate the degrees of all the vertices, which is O(m). You then go through the vertices looking for vertices with degree less than k. When you find such a ...


7

Let G1, G2 be graphs composed of sets of vertices and edges V1, V2 and E1, E2 respectively. G2 is isomorphic to a subgraph of G1 iff there exists a one-one mapping between each vertex of V2 and a vertex in V1, and between each edge in E2 and some edge in E1. So to be isomorphic, you need to have an exact match, including if the graph includes more than one ...


6

I didn't know the answer until you asked, but it seems like you can just export in gml, which networkx can read. Here are a few answers that might be useful: Neo4j export Tree Convert Neo4j DB to XML? https://github.com/tinkerpop/gremlin/wiki/Gremlin-Methods Hope that helps.


5

The answer to this question gives a source code of Ullmann's algorithm. These slides give an example, but the main ingredient of the algorithm is mentioned only without an example on slide "Ullmann’s Algorithm V2". So I will give an example below. We want to know whether GB has a subgraph isomorphic to GA. That is, we will be trying to map vertices of GA ...


5

This assumes you want all matching subgraphs of a given target which you'll have to define. The native way is to loop over all combinations of nodes, find those connected then check for an isomorphism. It's unclear if you want a network motif or a graphlet. In a graphlet all edges present in the original graph must be there - this would exclude 3-4-5 from ...


5

This is not really about minimizing edge lengths, especially since in the example the edges are defined with the attribute constraint=false. While this is not a complete answer, I think it can be found somewhere within the following two points: The order of appearance of nodes in the graph is important. Changing rankdir to LR contains unpredictable (or at ...


5

This is exactly the well-known NP-hard Steiner Tree problem. Without more details on what your instances look like, it's hard to give advice on an appropriate algorithm.


5

I think you are trying to solve the Subgraph Isomorphism Problem which is known to be NP-complete. That means, there is likely no fast algorithm to do what you need. Your requirement of similarity (and not only isomorphism) only adds another complexity. The Wikipedia page talks about Ulmann's algorithm that solves this problem in polynomial time (fast) for ...


4

There are many facets of this question that are not fully explained, so I'm going to give a somewhat exhaustive answer. My tendency to post walls-of-text notwithstanding. :/ Note also that I'm assuming this is a homework question or self-education question, so I'm not going to give a straight-up answer. The two basic algorithms for detecting connectivity of ...


4

More or less that would be something along these lines: GenerateSubgraphs(Graph G): powerV = powerset(G.V) powerE = powerset(G.E) subgraphs = {} foreach V in powerV: foreach E in powerE: accept = true foreach edge in E: if edge.u not in V or edge.v not in V: accept = false ...


4

The following was achieved by using invisible edges and constraint=false on some edges: graph { rankdir=LR; subgraph cluster01 { label="t=0"; a0 [label="A"]; a1 [label="B"]; a2 [label="C"]; a5 [label="E"]; a0 -- a1; a1 -- a2; a2 -- a5 [style=invis]; a2 -- a0 ...


3

I've solved this by using: print GM = iso.GraphMatcher(B,A,node_match=iso.categorical_node_match(['material', 'size'],['metal',1])) What I didn't know before is that ['metal',1] is just a default and not a hard match.


3

You might take a lock on the user node when starting the import, so that the second import would have to wait (and would have to check). With cypher queries you can delete the subgraphs and also export them to cypher again. There is export code for query-results in the Neo4j Console repository. There you can also find geoff-export and import and also ...


3

The problems isn't with the traits per se. The subgraph requires an edge_index property, because it stores a local mapping: typedef std::map<edge_index_type, edge_descriptor> LocalEdgeMap; LocalEdgeMap m_local_edge; // global -> local Because there's no edge_index_t property, the map's key type evaluates to void. This is documented ...


3

Assuming by "lower than O(n^2)" you mean something like O(|E|), then you can do that by using hashing structures. Put all nodes of S in a hashset, iterate over all edges of G and for each edge check whether both endpoints are in the hashset. Building the hashset is O(n), and assuming a sensible hashing function, processing all edges is O(|E|). If |E| in ...


3

Monomorphism. A monomorphism from one graph ("B") to another graph ("A") is equivalent to an isomorphism from B to a subgraph of A. The example is saying that any n vertex path ("chain") is monomorphic to an n vertex cycle. It would also be monomorphic to a n+1 vertex cycle, or n+k for any k.


3

VFLib2 is a C++ library for graph isomorphism finding. It also includes an Ullman implementation: http://mivia.unisa.it/datasets/graph-database/vflib/


3

You can add { rank=same; aSTART; bSTART cSTART; } After your subgraph cluster03. Dot will yield you a warning but draw the way yo want: D:\Code\funfunfun>dot -Tpng -oso1.png -Gcharset=latin1 so1.dot Warning: aSTART was already in a rankset, ignored in cluster _anonymous_0 Warning: bSTART was already in a rankset, ignored in cluster ...


3

Not a Java implementation but perhaps it will be useful for someone, here is how to do it in Python: import networkx as nx g = nx.Graph() # add nodes/edges to graph d = nx.connected_component_subgraphs(g) # d contains disconnected subgraphs # d[0] contains the biggest subgraph More information here.


3

In this article, the authors provide a way to transform a special Q-regular graph to a Q-1 - regular one in O(n^3), which implies your problem is solvable in O(n^4) for some special cases. You might want to take a look at the article and see if it's any help for you.


3

It looks like the following works: digraph { a; subgraph cluster_mysubgraph { b; } a->b; } So, there might be some rule like: "declare nodes in subgraph, beware of declaring edge in subgraphs because that tends to make nodes to be attached to that subgraph (unless they are already attached to another)". It might be ...


3

Since you're describing the data as subgraphs, why not use the igraph package which is very knowledgeable about graphs. So here's your data in data.frame form dd <- structure(list(V1 = c(21L, 78L, 21L, 65L, 4L, 3L, 4L, 4L, 124L, 28L, 28L, 7L, 7L, 17L, 16L, 65L, 28L, 28L, 136L, 7L, 56L), V2 = c(79L, 245L, 186L, 522L, 21L, 4L, 212L, 881L, 303L, 653L, ...


3

How about this #final all patent names patents <- unique(edge.attributes(gg)$patent) #check if criteria are met for patent okpatents <- sapply(patents, function(p){ cities <- V(gg)[inc(E(gg)[patent==p])]$city nc <- sum(cities=="BOISE") return(nc>0 & nc < length(cities)) }) #extract subgraph gs <- subgraph.edges(gg, ...


2

An alternative approach would be to construct a maximum matching (e.g. using Edmond's Blossom algorithm). This constructs a set of edges such that each vertex is connected to at most one edge. This may be more efficient than finding a Hamiltonian path and more likely to work (e.g. for disconnected graphs). Deleting the edges in the maximum matching will ...


2

Yes, you are allowed to do that, e.g. In [1]: import networkx as nx In [2]: square = nx.Graph() In [3]: square.add_cycle([1,2,3,4]) In [4]: triangle = nx.Graph() In [5]: triangle.add_cycle([10,20,30]) In [6]: shapes = nx.Graph() In [7]: shapes.add_edge(triangle,square) In [8]: shapes.edges() Out[8]: [(<networkx.classes.graph.Graph at ...



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