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7

colorbar() accepts a cax keyword argument that allows you to specify the axes object that the colorbar will be drawn on. In your case, you would change your colorbar call to the following: # colorbar axes = plt.subplot2grid((4, 2), (0, 1), rowspan=3) plt.colorbar(pc, cax=axes) This will take up the whole space given by subplot2grid; you can adjust this ...


6

Using make_axes is even easier and gives a better result. It also provides possibilities to customise the positioning of the colorbar. Also note the option of subplots to share x and y axes. import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import matplotlib as mpl fig, axes = plt.subplots(nrows=2, ncols=2, sharex=True, sharey=True) for ax in axes.flat: ...


4

Generally speaking, matplotlib artists can't be in more than one axes, and axes can't be in more than one figure. (In some cases, you can break some of these rules, but it won't work in general.) Therefore, the short answer is no. However, you might consider something like the following. You can have the plot in question as a subplot, than then bind a ...


4

Re-factor your function to take an Axes object to draw to as an argument: def fun1(ax): ax.plot(range(5)) def fun2(ax): ax.plot(range(5)[::-1]) fig, ax = plt.subplots(1, 1) fun1(ax) fun2(ax) plt.draw()


4

You are hitting the differences between the pyplot/state machine interface and the OO interface. See Which is the recommended way to plot: matplotlib or pylab? and How can I attach a pyplot function to a figure instance? for longer explainations. For a much longer tutorial see Anatomy of Matplotlib There is also some confusion about the layers of objects ...


3

If you create a 2D array of plots, e.g. with: >>> fig, axarray = plt.subplots(3, 4) then axarray is a 2D array of objects, with each element containing a matplotlib.axes.AxesSubplot: >>> axarray.shape (3, 4) The problem is that when you index axarray[0], you're actually indexing a whole row of that array, containing several axes: ...


3

Here's a little example of how you might do this with axes to create an axis with a colored background and uistack to move it to the back: figure h1 = subplot(2,2,1); h2 = subplot(2,2,2); h3 = subplot(2,2,3); h4 = subplot(2,2,4); p1 = get(h1,'Position'); p2 = get(h2,'Position'); border = 0.3*p1(1); x1 = p1(1)-border; y1 = p1(2)-border; width1 = ...


3

The built in subplot function is really powerful and nice. Instead of going with custom computed positions, I think it is best to stick with subplot. The problem of course is that subplot sticks in "extra" space. This space is controlled by two factors. The first is the user controlled SubplotDefaultAxesLocation property of the application data of figures. ...


3

I answered this at this other topic and also gave an example of how to improve axes (subplot) space usage here (search for the subfunction setCustomPlotArea inside the function kmeans_test). The short answer is to spread axes position to occupy the hole figure as follows: set(gca,'Position',[0 0 1 1]) % Make the axes occupy the hole figure But if you ...


3

You can add titles to each sub plot using the set_title() method of the axes. Each title will still be display above the axis. If you want text below the axis, you could use set_xlabel. For example: import pylab as plt ax1 = plt.subplot2grid((3,3), (0,0), colspan=3) ax2 = plt.subplot2grid((3,3), (1,0), colspan=2) ax3 = plt.subplot2grid((3,3), (1, 2), ...


3

It's easiest to use fig.add_subplot directly in this case. As a quick example: import matplotlib.pyplot as plt fig = plt.figure(figsize=(6, 8)) # Axes that share the x-axis ax = fig.add_subplot(4, 1, 1) axes = [ax] + [fig.add_subplot(4, 1, i, sharex=ax) for i in range(2, 4)] # The bottom independent axes axes.append(fig.add_subplot(4, 1, 4)) # Let's ...


3

You could try using the drawnow command after each subplot.


3

If you are asking how to remove the extra ticks on the Y axis, you can use this: set(gca,'ytick',[-1 0 1]); Otherwise, I think that we'll need more description.


3

You have one obvious problem: all of the examples in the link you provide look like f, axarr = plt.subplots(...) where the f is the Figure you are subsequently treating as if it had a plot attribute. If you are working with an arbitrary number of subplots, you could do: axarr = plt.subplots(...) f, axarr = axarr[0], axarr[1:] Also, you are using a ...


2

You can use the rect argument to axes() to set the (left,bottom,right,top) extent of the axes within the figure canvas. These are specified in normalized canvas units between 0 and 1. import matplotlib.pyplot as pp fig = pp.figure() ax = fig.add_axes((0,0,1,1)) ax.plot(range(10))


2

when subplots overlap, the earlier one is hidden. try slightly decreasing the 'Position' width. they should show up again also, there could be some "snap to grid" issues, how does this behave when you resize the window?


2

The subaxis funcion you can find here at the Matlab File Exchange: subaxis by Aslak Grinsted offers you a very convenient solution.


2

You can make use of the gridspec module of matplotlib: import matplotlib.pyplot as plt from matplotlib import gridspec def plot_data(avg_rel_track, sd_rel_track_sum, sd_index, sd_grad): fig = plt.figure(figsize=(15,10)) gs = gridspec.GridSpec(4, 1, height_ratios=[1, 1 ,1.5, 1]) ax0 = plt.subplot(gs[0]) ax1 = plt.subplot(gs[1]) ax2 = ...


2

From the help for subplot: If a subplot specification causes a new axes to overlap anexisting axes, the existing axes is deleted - unless the positionof the new and existing axes are identical. Your code is doing this, though you may not realize it. You call subplot(151), which places an axis in the default location and then you position it manually. ...


2

You can do it with a lot of control about positioning, using the inset_axes. import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as pl import matplotlib from mpl_toolkits.axes_grid1.inset_locator import inset_axes x=np.linspace(0.0,1.0,100) y=np.linspace(0.0,1.0,100) xv,yv=np.meshgrid(x,y) fig = plt.figure() ax1 = fig.add_subplot(211) ax2 = fig.add_subplot(212, ...


2

Use copyobj to a new figure and then use saveas with the new figure handle: Example code that YOU should have provided (see SSCCE): figure nLines = 2; nColumns = 3; handles = zeros(nLines,nColumns) for line = 1:nLines for column = 1:nColumns handles(line,column)=subplot(nLines,nColumns,column+(line-1)*nColumns); plot([line column]); ...


2

your loop needs to look somehow like this: x = 1:2; y = x; f = 2; %number of figures c = 2; %number of plots per column per figure r = 2; %number of plots per row per figure n = repmat(cumsum(ones(1,r*c)),1,f); %index for subplots h = ceil( (1:f*r*c)/(r*c) ); %index of figures for ii=1:f*r*c % calculations % plot specifier figure( h(ii) ) ...


2

You can remove your initial plt.figure(). When calling plt.subplots() a new figure is created, so you first call doesn't do anything. The subplots command in the background will call plt.figure() for you, and any keywords will be passed along. So just add the figsize keyword to the subplots() command: def plot(reader): channels=[] for i in reader: ...


2

I was trying to solve a very similar problem just tonight! Some of the code may be unnecessary but it will give you the main idea... ...I hope Inspiration from: http://hackmap.blogspot.com.au/2008/06/pylab-matplotlib-imagemap.html and other many and varied sources over the last two hours... #! /usr/bin/env python import numpy as np import ...


2

You are replacing the first fig when you call subplot inside the loop, here is a fixed version. See that ax returned by subplots is a np.ndarray, so you have to give an index ax[foo] to obtain the AxesSubplot object. diff = [[10, 20, 30], [40, 50, 60], [70, 80, 90]] comp = ["foo", "bar", "baz"] fig, ax = plt.subplots(3, 1) for foo in range(0, len(diff)): ...


2

use ax= argument to set which subplot object to plot: import pandas as pd import numpy as np from matplotlib.pylab import plt comp1 = np.random.normal(0,1,size=200) values = pd.Series(comp1) plt.close("all") f = plt.figure() sp1 = f.add_subplot(2,2,1) values.hist(bins=100, alpha=0.5, color="r", normed=True, ax=sp1) sp2 = f.add_subplot(2,2,2) ...


2

try this: im = grid[0].imshow(np.random.random((10,50))) ax = im.get_axes( ) ax.grid( 'on' ) ax.locator_params(axis='x',nbins=20) ax.locator_params(axis='y',nbins=3)


2

The problem seems to be the line subplot(ceil(sqrt(960)),ceil(sqrt(960)),i) which causes the 9 images in the inner loop to be overwritten in the same subplot (so only the last one is seen). Change it to subplot(ceil(sqrt(960)),ceil(sqrt(960)),(i-1)*9+j) so that all subplots are used.


2

The error is a simple mistake with your matplotlib code. You are plotting over your own image. Where you have: if box_plot: plt.subplot(1, 1, 1) plt.boxplot(data.data) plt.subplot(1, 2, 2) you need to specify the two rows of your subplots in both calls to plt.subplots This will work. if box_plot: plt.subplot(1, 2, 1) ...


2

To get a specific type of object's handle, try using findobj to look for a specific 'Type' property. For example, ha1 = findobj(h1,'Type','axes'); However, you can probably just apply copyobj (instead of changing the 'parent': copyobj(ha1,hf2) This way you can copy the axes (ha1) to a new figure (hf2). You can do the same with any graphics element, ...



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