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6

You can build a dispatch table of subroutines. Something like this my @foo_table = \(&foo1, &foo2, &foo3); foo(2); sub foo { my $whichsub = shift; die unless my $foosub = $foo_table[$whichsub-1]; my @fooed = $foosub->(@_); # does stuff to @fooed } sub foo1 { # does stuff to @_ } sub foo2 { # does other stuff to @_ ...


5

One of the biggest drawbacks is that it makes the code harder to maintain. Very few people seem to understand what a Perl prototype actually does, so there is a lot of guessing and cargo-culting around them. Note, though, that Perl 5.20 has added a subroutine signature feature. It's still experimental, but it's really kinda awesome and what most people ...


4

Pass a copy of the variable to the library. Or pass to your subroutine by VALUE instead of INTENT(IN). It will be changed, but only inside your own subroutine.


3

This line: return $argument unless $function = $functiontable{$function}; doesn't make sense. In your subroutine iterate, $function is a string and $functiontable{$function} is a reference to a subroutine. I am not sure what the purpose of this is: is it to compare against the stored function? is it to use the function referenced by the name $function? ...


3

The problem is this line. return $argument unless $function = $functiontable{$function}; The variable $function is being repurposed and overwritten from a string (the function name) to a code reference (the function to be executed). Later, it's passed into iterate which faithfully ignores it. Two things would improve this code and avoid that sort of ...


2

Your subroutine may return array or reference to hash. my @array = foo(); # @array contains "keys %hash" my $hash_reference = foo(); print $array[0],"\n"; # keys returned by foo are in random order print $hash_reference->{key1},"\n"; # sample code sub foo { # Define a hash my %hash = ( 'key1' => 'val1', 'key2' => ...


2

The first time your subroutine iterate is called it translates the subroutine name in $function from a name to a subroutine reference So the first time iterate calls itself it is passing the subroutine reference, and the line return $argument unless $function = $functiontable{$function}; will stringify the reference and attempt to find an element of the ...


2

As Vladimir F comments load_things is a binding name of the derived type reflections. It isn't, as the answer says, the name of a subroutine. As, then, IanH says, you could change your code to call load_things_sub ( nThings, reflections ) but you'll also need to make that a public entity of the module. You're probably wanting to use the type-bound way ...


2

Your module doesn't have a subroutine named load_things - it has a subroutine named load_things_sub. Choose the correct variant of the name, and then correct the name in the other statement appropriately. Subsequent to this answer being initially submitted, the OP added a private statement to the module that makes the load_things_sub inaccessible in scopes ...


2

This probably isn't a good idea. There's a bunch of subtle gotchas waiting to happen around caller context. However - return isn't actually required by a sub - if there is no return the sub implicitly returns the result of the last calculation. #!/usr/bin/env perl use strict; use warnings; sub parent { my @results = ( "one", "two" ); child ( ...


2

First a word of warning. You are requesting information on performing an extremely poor practice. Actions at a distance should be eliminated, not sought. You can bind two names to the same SV. A name bound as such is called an alias. You can't return a bound name, so you can't return an alias. How about returning an object that overloads stringification? ...


1

Yes, if the interface is implicit or the dummy argument is an explicit shape array, as you have, a pointer is passed. (The standard doesn't say that explicitly, but effectively it is the only possible implementation. But it can be a pointer to a copy! If the array is not contiguous and the interface is implicit there will be a copy! In your case: no copy: ...


1

I believe you have in Navigate() something like: Dim ieDocument as Object which represent a web page (web document). If so, you need to create Copyimage() subroutine with argument, like this: Sub Copyimage(ieDocImages as object) and call this sub from previous one passing document (ieDocument) as a parameter: Call Copyimage(ieDocument) or do ...


1

OK , so the function name is process (meaning you need to process something) NOW , in order for your function to process something you need to give it that thing to be processed , right? and the x variable which is an int data type ( int data type because it reflect the same value that was assigned inside your main method "input") is your argument that ...


1

Your code does actually work if you pass correct parameters. My best guess is that the strings like eyes=2 that you're using contain spurious whitespace such as a trailing newline Here's the test program that I used to work on your subrouitines use strict; use warnings; use 5.010; my %users = ( '000001' => { eyes => 2, gender => 1 }, ...


1

You need to include the file containing add in your compile command, e.g. f2py -c -m average average.f add.f The shared library you import needs to have its references resolved at import time, which means they need to be either contained in the library or linked to it. You can accomplish keeping your functions in separate libraries like this: gfortran ...


1

Your question is moot since prototypes have no effect on the need for parens. As long as the sub is declared before it's used, parens are optional. $ perl -E' sub foo { say @_; } foo "bar"; ' bar $ perl -E' sub foo; foo "bar"; sub foo { say @_; } ' bar Note that there are serious downsides to omitting parens. It's easy to accidentally ...


1

Just add a parameter so that if it's passed in, it returns keys: sub foo { my $want_keys = shift; my %hash = (a => 1, b => 2, c => 3, ); return keys %hash if $want_keys; return %hash; } my %hash = foo(); my @keys = foo(1); # or foo('keys'); The only other way to do this is a hash is returned if a list is wanted, otherwise an ...


1

One possibility would be to change DO i = 0, 10 IF (inval-i == 0) error_flag = 1 ! How can I gracefully exit now? x = x / REAL(inval-i) END DO to DO i = 0, 10 IF (inval-i == 0) THEN error_flag = 1 EXIT END IF ! Now you have gracefully exited x = x / REAL(inval-i) END DO ! Code to tidy up if ...


1

Seeing your example it seems that you are just missing the return statement: error_flag = 0 x = REAL(inval) DO i = 0, 10 IF (inval-i == 0) then error_flag = 1 return END IF x = x / REAL(inval-i) END DO



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