Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

8

Shift pops an element from your parameter (see: http://perldoc.perl.org/functions/shift.html). So @files can only contain one value. Try sub foo { my $one = shift @_; my @files = @_; print $one."\n"; print @files; } foo(@ARGV);


8

I hope you realise that this is just code seasoning, and all you are achieving is a tidier syntax at the expense of clarity? Perl won't allow you to pass more than one bare block to a subroutine, but the second actual parameter could be a call to a subroutine that also takes a single block and simply returns the code reference. This program demonstrates. ...


7

What you're seeing is not a mere subroutine, but a method on some object called $val. I take it you might see something on top of the program like this: use Foo::Bar; # Some Perl module This Perl module will contain the method ReadSim. Somewhere in your code, you probably see something like this: my $val = Foo::Bar->new; # If the people who wrote ...


7

It's easy to suppress the warning. Just place the following line above your next: no warnings "exiting"; The warning is there for a reason - using next in a helper sub like that can be confusing for the next person who has to read the code (who might be you in 6 months' time!) because the next does not occur lexically within the loop block. If you're just ...


6

This only conditionally creates a new variable, and can lead to strange to understand results: my $foo = $args{foo} if defined $args{foo}; perldoc perlsyn has this to say: NOTE: The behaviour of a my, state, or our modified with a statement modifier conditional or loop construct (for example, my $x if ... ) is undefined. The value of the my variable ...


6

From the Learning perl 6th edition page 179 (footnote) It’s probably not a good idea, but you could use these loop-control operators from inside a subroutine to control a loop that is outside the subroutine. That is, if a subroutine is called in a loop block, and the subroutine executes last when there’s no loop block running inside the ...


5

You could certainly make a dictionary: currencies = {} currencies['USD'] = 1.64 currencies['EUR'] = 1.20552 currencies['JPY'] = 171.181 currencies['GBP'] = 1. number = currencies[currency2] what's great about this is you can also do: other_number = currencies[currency1] exchange_rate = number / other_number # exchange rate BETWEEN the two currencies


5

If you just want to have all the lines of the file in an array, you can also write it like this: sub read_lines { my $file = shift; if (open(my $fh, "<", $file)) { my @lines = <$fh>; chomp(@lines); close $fh; return @lines; } else { die "Failed to open Filehandle for '$file': $!\n"; } } or ...


5

To create a regular expression for use later, we use qr//: my $regexp = qr/^Perl$/; This compiles the regular expression for use later. If there's a problem with your regular expression, you'll hear about it immediately. To use this pre-compiled regular expression you can use any of the following: # See if we have a match $string =~ $regexp; # A simple ...


5

You're passing a hash reference (as you should), so therefore assign it to a scalar in your parameter catching: sub delete_unwanted { my ($hashref, $group_size) = @_; print "'$group_size'\n" } If you later want to dereference it, you can my %newHoA = %$hashref;, but that will be a copy of the original hash. To access the original structure, just ...


4

Perl's tr/// operator does not support variables. You can find various strategies to work around this here: Perl's tr/// is not doing what I want To summarize, you have two main options: Wrap your tr/// in an eval. Convert your tr/// into a substitution using s///.


4

You cannot read from a file opened in append >> mode. It seems you've just renamed the OUT filehandle to FP, but that isn't enough. The original code included a chdir $seculert_dir – this makes sense because now we don't have to prefix our filenames with the directory all the time (it's the equivalent to the cd command in the shell). The original ...


4

$ perl -MDevel::Size=total_size -E' my $s = "x" x 100_000; my $x = \$s; my $y = \$s; say total_size($x); say total_size($y); ' 100048 100048 Does that mean that the size of $x and $y combined is 200KB? No. Same idea here. It's not the size of the sub, but the size of the references, and everything it references, directly and indirectly. $ ...


4

What I would do using an anonymous HASH reference : #case 1, pass in hash test({arg1 => 'test', arg2 => 'test2'}); #case 2, just pass in single values test('test', 'test2'); sub test { my $arg = shift; if(ref $arg eq 'HASH') { ...; } #if values passed in as single values, do something else else { ...; } } ...


4

Assign the result of the new command to a variable and interact with it frame aframe = new frame(); aframe.setVisible(true); aframe.Sub123(); You may also consider taking a look at Code Conventions for the Java Programming Language


4

You need to do less compression of your code. You're creating an object anomymously via: new Frame().setVisible(true); and so have no variable with which to call methods on your object. so instead do: MyFrame myFrame = new MyFrame(); // create a variable! myFrame.setVisible(true); myFrame.someMethod(); // use it! As an aside, you will want to ...


4

Variables in Perl are not private, but they can have a limited scope. Such as when declaring them with my inside a subroutine. The arguments to the subroutine are stored in the variable @_. do_stuff($foo, $bar); sub do_stuff { my ($first, $second) = @_; # direct assignment print "First: $first, Second: $second\n"; } The my declaration makes the ...


4

Calling with & is generally a code smell that somebody doesn't know what they're doing and are in a Perl4 mindset. In your specific example, it works exactly the same. However, calling with & disables function prototypes, so advanced users may use it in certain circumstances. You should expect to see a comment why next to the call in that case.


4

Perl best practice: don't define function prototypes unless you really know what you're doing. #!/usr/bin/perl -w use strict; sub test_base { print @_; } sub test { print @_; return test_base(@_, 'Filename.txt'); } test('foo', 'bar');


4

Different people will have different opinions, but my opinion is that using lexical scalars to localise acccess to subroutines may be a useful technique in situations where it is important to limit access; for instance, when those subroutines could be called maliciously by someone unauthorised, most often through a web page. If you are considering doing it ...


4

I guess you could make a 256 element lookup table so you just do $result += $lookup{$char}; instead of my $temp = ord($char); $result += $temp**5; but you should really run the profiler to see what the problem is first... here. EDIT (jm666 and ikegami) - Added the Benchmark example. As you can see by observing the results of power_goodloop and ...


4

It is bad practice to call subroutines using the ampersand &. As long as you use parentheses or have predeclared the symbol as a subroutine name, the call will compile fine. The ampersand is necessary when you are dealing with the subroutine as a data item, for instance to take a reference to it. my $sub = \&PopupMsg;


4

In your program you do not explicitly declare var. In days of yore Fortran supported implicit typing and, by default, variables whose name begin with a v will be of type real. Fortran retains this capability, though its use is now frowned upon. I think you are thinking (as if I had a clue what you are thinking) that var in the program scope will somehow ...


4

You can use the heredoc (http://www.php.net/manual/en/language.types.string.php#language.types.string.syntax.heredoc): <?php $str = <<<"EOD" <p>Example of string</p> <b>spanning multiple lines</b> <p>using nowdoc syntax.</p> EOD; echo $str; Edit: make sure to use double quotes


4

$i is aliased to elements of @_ array due foreach feature (and @_ elements are aliased to elements of the @list due @_ magic). From perldoc If any element of LIST is an lvalue, you can modify it by modifying VAR inside the loop. Conversely, if any element of LIST is NOT an lvalue, any attempt to modify that element will fail. In other words, the foreach ...


4

You use some really bad features of old Fortran. Learn to use implicit none, declare all arguments and preferably learn Fortran 90 and later standards, mainly modules and interfaces. Also learn to use compiler warnings, because gfortran can identify the error: gfortran -fbacktrace -fcheck=all -Wall -g t1.f90 t1.f90:8.12: call qgaus(func,x1,x2,val) ...


4

Your warning instinct is probably right. As you say, next just is not the kind of statement one embeds in a subroutine. Even though you do not prefer it, this is almost certainly better: while (#condition) { ## do stuff &skip, next if (#condition to skip iteration); ## do more stuff, with more calls to &skip } sub skip() { ## ...


4

The values are copied out of the parameter array @_ to the list of scalar variables. If the array is shorter than the list, then the excess variables are set to undef. If the array is longer than the list, then excess array elements are ignored. Note that the original array @_ is unmodified by the assignment. No values are created or lost, so it remains ...


4

You have posted a poor piece of Perl code that you have presumably written all in one chunk. Programming doesn't work like that, especially in script-like languages, and you should write just two or three lines at a time before testing that it works as you expect. That way, if you have a question at all, it can be about just a few lines of code whose input ...


4

Please take a look at my answer to a similar question. Perl is hyper-flexible, in that a subroutine can simply ignore excess parameters, provide defaults for missing ones, or die if the parameters aren't exactly what is expected. Perl's author, Larry Wall, is a linguist, and the rationale behind this is that subroutines behave like imperative verbs; so ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible