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2

You can use this regex: (\d+$). It returns the last sequence of digits in the string. EDIT - some explanation: The \d means any digit. The + means one or more of the previous symbols. Since the previous symbol is a digit, then \d+ means "one or more digits". The $ means the end of the string, so \d+$ is the last sequence of digits in the string.


2

Another option word function of stringr package library(stringr) word(df1$V1,1,sep = "\\|") Data df1 <- read.table(text = "ABC|DEF|GHI, ABCD|EFG|HIJK, ABCDE|FGHI|JKL, DEF|GHIJ|KLM, GHI|JKLM|NO|PQRS, BCDE|FGHI|JKL")


2

with stringi: library(stringi) df <- read.table(text="ABC|DEF|GHI,1 ABCD|EFG|HIJK,2 ABCDE|FGHI|JKL,3 DEF|GHIJ|KLM,4 GHI|JKLM|NO|PQRS,5 BCDE|FGHI|JKL,6", sep=",", header=FALSE, stringsAsFactors=FALSE) stri_match_first_regex(df$V1, "(.*?)\\|")[,2] ## [1] "ABC" "ABCD" "ABCDE" "DEF" "GHI" "BCDE"


2

This question really too opinion-based, but I will try to answer it point by point. Does this design appear logical to you? Sensible? It seems logical to me. Maybe such opinion came from strncmp-styled functions, but with such design you can just pass your buffer length for len parameter and it will work fine. But, if you're trying to access substring that ...


2

I've solved with instr/substr: select substr(column_a,1,instr(substr(column_a,1,40), ' ', -1 )) column1, substr(column_a,instr(substr(column_a,1,40), ' ', -1 )+1, 40) column2 from table1


2

Always the first condition is true, as both selectors have . and hence the last index is always defined in the first condition. var classSelector = selector.lastIndexOf('.')? -1 : selector.lastIndexOf('.'); var idSelector = selector.lastIndexOf('#')? -1: selector.lastIndexOf('#'); if(idSelector>classSelector) selector.subStr(idSelector+1); else selector....


2

The first error tells you that you cannot use an ignore.case() as a function. The second error is related to the fact that the str_subset function does not seem to have any ignore_case argument. Use an inline case-insensitive modifier (?i): D[,NEW:= lapply(D[,C1],function(x)str_subset(as.character(D2$COLUMN1), paste0("(?i)",x)))] ...


2

According to the last comment you left, the following should do: len <- nchar(postal_code0) substring(postal_code0, 1, ifelse(len <= 3, len, len - 3))


1

Here is a solution using a recursive factored subquery (Oracle 11.2 and above): with inputs ( str ) as ( select to_clob('ABCDEF:PmId12345RmLn1VlId0,ABCDEF:PmId12345RmLn1VlId0,ABCDEF:PmId12345RmLn1VlId0,ABCDEF:PmId12345RmLn1VlId0,ABCDEF:PmId12345RmLn1VlId0') from dual ), prep ( s, n, token, st_pos, end_pos ) as ( select ',' || ...


1

It should be a comment to the basename answer but I haven't enough point. If you do not use double quotes, basename will not work with path where there is space character: $ basename /home/foo/bar foo/bar.png bar ok with quotes " " $ basename "/home/foo/bar foo/bar.png" bar.png file example $ cat a /home/parent/child 1/child 2/child 3/filename1 /...


1

exactly what @le_m says: myArray = [ "","","123456789","","",""]; var newArray = myArray.map(e => e.substr(0, 5));


1

ES6 with array.map myArray = [ "","","123456789","","",""]; var newArray = myArray.map((s) => s.substr(0, 5))


1

It's hard to know what your exact problem is without seeing all of your code, but here is a for loop that goes over all the elements in the first array and takes the first 5 or fewer characters of each string to insert into a new array. myArray = [ "","","123456789","","",""]; var newArray = []; for(var i = 0; i < myArray.length; i++) { newArray.push(...


1

var $ = function (selector) { return selector.match(/[#\.][^\.#]+$/); } $("img.some_class")[0]; // ==> '.some_class' $("div.some_class#some_id")[0]; // ==> #some_id $("asbasifhwaehf"); // ==> null, no match EDIT: addressing @Joe's requirement, I make this edit to return the whole input string in case it does not contain # or . var $ = function ...



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