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40

Try this test: any(substring in string for substring in substring_list) It will return True if any of the substrings in substring_list is contained in string. Note that there is a Python analogue of Marc Gravell's answer in the linked question: from itertools import imap any(imap(s.__contains__, substring_list)) Probably the above version using a ...


15

You can also use a list comprehension : matches = [s for s in mytext if 'foobar' in s] (and if you were really looking for strings starting with 'foobar' as THC4k noticed, consider the following : matches = [s for s in mytext if s.startswith('foobar')]


13

Your example input/output suggests that you are looking for a power set. You could generate a power set for a string using itertools module in Python: from itertools import chain, combinations def powerset(iterable): "powerset([1,2,3]) --> () (1,) (2,) (3,) (1,2) (1,3) (2,3) (1,2,3)" s = list(iterable) return ...


11

I'm not certain that this is what you're after but BioPerl has an approximate-grep tool called Bio::Grep::Backend::Agrep: Bio::Grep::Backend::Agrep searches for a query with agrep And agrep is "approximate grep". AFAIK, this builds a database and then uses that database to make your searches faster so this sounds like what you're after. Looks like ...


10

There are O(n^2) different substrings, so no algorithm can enumerate them all with a complexity better than O(n^2)! The problem of finding the lexicographically smallest substring is a totally different one, though. It's always the empty string, so that's an O(1) operation (and a very pointless one, too).


9

If you really want the FIRST occurrence of a string that STARTS WITH foobar (which is what your words say, though very different from your code, all answers provided, your mention of grep -- how contradictory can you get?-), try: found = next((s for s in mylist if s.startswith('foobar')), '') this gives an empty string as the found result if no item of ...


9

String test = "AA BB CC BB BB CC BB"; System.out.println(Arrays.deepToString(sort(test))); Output: [BB, CC, AA] Code: public static String[] sort(String test) { String[] strings = test.split(" "); HashMap<String,Integer> map = new HashMap<String,Integer>(); for (String s : strings) { Integer i = map.get(s); if (i ...


9

Try this: def consecutive_groups(iterable): s = tuple(iterable) for size in range(1, len(s)+1): for index in range(len(s)+1-size): yield iterable[index:index+size] >>> print list(consecutive_groups('abcd')) ['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'ab', 'bc', 'cd', 'abc', 'bcd', 'abcd'] And the number of combinations is simply equal to ...


9

Note: I assume here that you can use each substring more than once. You can generalize the solution to include this restriction by changing how we define subproblems. That will have a negative impact on space as well as expected runtime, but the problem remains polynomial. This is a dynamic programming problem. (And a great question!) Let's define ...


8

Use can simple use parse_url(), parse_str() For getting parameter value from url. You can do somthing like this: $url ="http://localhost/OnlineShop/show_cat.php?catid=1"; $parts = parse_url($url); parse_str($parts['query'], $query); echo $query['catid']; DEMO Want less code??? try simpler method as @HankyžõÉPanky Suggest: $url ...


7

s/(.*)\1/$1/g Be warned that the running time of this regular expression is quadratic in the length of the string.


7

If you're willing to accept the converse—seeing highlighted differences rather than similarities—then the ediff package will handle this for you. Try the function ediff-buffers. You can run it interactively with M-x ediff-buffers RET and specify the first buffer to compare, then the second. The first one will wind up on the top and the second ...


7

Most peoples' names consist of at least two words. This will only get one of them: cout<<"Please enter your full name. "; cin>>name; istream operator>> is whitespace delimited. Use getline instead: std::getline(std::cin, name); For your purposes, you could probably do this, which is simpler: std::string first, middle, last; ...


6

for s in lst: if 'foobar' in s: print(s)


6

This is because your string contains the newline character. From the fgets documentation: A newline character makes fgets stop reading, but it is considered a valid character by the function and included in the string copied to str. This should fix the problem (demo): #include <stdio.h> #include <string.h> char animals[][20] = { "dogs ...


6

Analysis of Exception: From Java7 Docs of StringIndexOutOfBoundsException public class StringIndexOutOfBoundsException extends IndexOutOfBoundsException Thrown by String methods to indicate that an index is either negative or greater than the size of the string. From Java 7 Docs of substring public String substring(int beginIndex,int endIndex) ...


6

Yup, you just need Any to see if "any" of the target strings are contained in the array element: List<int> index = stringArray .Select((Value, Index) => new { Value, Index }) .Where(pair => searchArray.Any(target => pair.Value.Contains(target))) .Select(pair => pair.Index) .ToList();


5

text = """ When in the course of human Events, it becomes necessary for one People to dissolve the Political Bands which have connected them with another, and to assume among the Powers of the Earth, the separate and equal Station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature?s God entitle them, a decent Respect to the Opinions of Mankind requires that they ...


5

results = [ s for s in lst if 'foobar' in s] print(results)


5

If it's always the same position you're replacing, you could do something like: >>> s = s[0:-2] + "A" + s[-1:] >>> print s abcdefghijAl In the general case, you could do: >>> rindex = -2 #Second to the last letter >>> s = s[0:rindex] + "A" + s[rindex+1:] >>> print s abcdefghijAl Edit: The very general case, ...


5

TypeError: 'str' object does not support item assignment This is to be expected - python strings are immutable. One way is to do some slicing and dicing. Like this: >>> aa = 'abcdefghijkl' >>> changed = aa[0:-2] + 'A' + aa[-1] >>> print changed abcdefghijAl The result of the concatenation, changed will be another immutable ...


5

fgets includes the input newline character in the buffer. Your strings don't have a newline in them, so they'll never match.


5

You can use a regular expression, but it seems like using index is the simplest in this case: int start = path.lastIndexOf('/') + 1; int end = path.lastIndexOf('_'); String album = path.substring(start, end); You might want to throw in some error checking in case the formatting assumptions are violated.


5

substring1 or substring2 or substring3 Assuming that substring1 is not the empty string, this expression evaluates to substring1 because substring1 is truthy. This is then checked to see if it's in string. The other substrings have no effect on the statement. In other words, the ors are evaluated before the in, and the or evaluates to the first truthy ...


5

This regular expression will work: string input = @"aaa\\,aaa,aaa"; var re = new Regex(@"(?<!\\),"); string[] parts = re.Split(input); Basically it says to split on each comma, except for commas that are preceeded by two backslashes, as per your requirements. Here's a different way to write that code that gives you some comments for future ...


5

It appears that your lat and long are numbers (if not, there may be better options). Numbers in JS have the toFixed() method to convert them into strings with a given number of decimal places. In your case, (-74.80111590000001).toFixed(7) should return the string "-74.8011159", which I believe is what you want. It will also round correctly, which substring ...


5

s2 is a length 8 array of pointers to char. You are making its first element point to s1 starting at position 10. That is all. You are not using the remaining elements of that array. Therefore the length of s2 is irrelevant. You could have done this instead: char* s2 = &s1[10]; If you want to create a string out of part of s1, you can use ...


5

Instead of cut, use dirname and basename: input=/path/to/foo dir=$(dirname "$input") file=$(basename "$input") Now $DIR is /path/to and $FILE is foo. dirname will also give you a valid directory for relative paths to the working directory (I mean that $(dirname file.txt) is .). This means, for example, that you can write "$dir/some/stuff/foo" without ...


4

The function strpos($haystack, $needle) will tell you the first position in the $haystack string where the substring appears. As long as you are careful to check the with the === comparison operator, you can see if "12.34" appears at the beginning of the IP address. if (strpos ($rem_address, "12.34.") === 0) echo "It's a match"; Check out the ...



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