Hot answers tagged

43

DateTime.Now.AddYears(-1) From the documentation: A number of years. The value parameter can be negative or positive.


39

You could do this. adjusted_datetime = (datetime_from_form.to_time - n.hours).to_datetime


27

The script you found over-complicated the issue. The following worked for me: $(function(){ // Cache reference to our container var $container = $("#container"); // A function for updating max-height function updateMaxHeight () { $container.css("max-height", $(this).height() - 100); } // Call updateMaxHeight when browser ...


26

You actually have to transport Today into a variable and let that assignment work there. The following code will produce the result you expect (I just verified it because your post made me think twice). Dim dt As DateTime = Date.Today dt = dt.AddMonths(-2) Dim x As String = dt.ToString()


23

If you have strings you need to parse them into a java.util.Date using java.text.SimpleDateFormat. Something like: java.text.DateFormat df = new java.text.SimpleDateFormat("hh:mm:ss"); java.util.Date date1 = df.parse("18:40:10"); java.util.Date date2 = df.parse("19:05:15"); long diff = date2.getTime() - date1.getTime(); ...


18

Because numbers in JavaScript are floating-point. They have limited precision. When JavaScript sees a very long number, it rounds it to the nearest number it can represent as a 64-bit float. In your script, start and end get rounded to the same value. alert(1234567890123456789); // says: 1234567890123456800 alert(1234567890123456799); // says: ...


18

substr($string, 1) http://php.net/manual/en/function.substr.php


17

You can use DATEDIFF(): SELECT DATEDIFF(Day, startDate, endDate) FROM table SELECT DATEDIFF(Second, date, GETDATE()) FROM table


17

The advance method is nice if you want to be more explicit about behavior like this. adjusted = time_from_form.advance(:hours => -n)


15

The JavaScript charCodes, which you test for during a keypress event, are ASCII. 109 is the correct keyCode, if used in a keydown or keyup event. "-" has a charCode of 45.


13

The easiest way is to actually write two functions, one which converts the day to a number of days from a given start date, then another which converts back to a date. Once the date is expressed as a number of days, it's trivial to add or subtract to it. You can find the algorithms here: http://alcor.concordia.ca/~gpkatch/gdate-algorithm.html


12

This might help you (somewhat). select a.id, a.length, coalesce(a.length - (select b.length from foo b where b.id = a.id + 1), a.length) as diff from foo a


10

Assuming you are using java.util.Date: long totalTime = endDate.getTime() - startDate.getTime(); The result will be the total time in milliseconds.


9

A great explanation can be found here. http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/java/library/j-jtp0114/ Floating point arithmetic is rarely exact. While some numbers, such as 0.5, can be exactly represented as a binary (base 2) decimal (since 0.5 equals 2-1), other numbers, such as 0.1, cannot be. As a result, floating point operations may result in ...


9

You can't subtract from a symbol. A symbol is not a number. What you seem to want to do is to decrease the value of params[:id], which is of course perfectly possible (after converting the id from string to integer) by doing params[:id] = params[:id].to_i - 1 or id = params[:id].to_i while @image.nil? @image = Image.find_by_id(id) id -= 1 end The ...


8

Create a new set and give the one to be cloned as an argument. This avoids casting and so you don't lose generics. private DataObject[] invert( Set<DataObject> set ){ Set<DataObject> keys = new HashSet<DataObject>(AllDataObjects.keySet()); keys.removeAll( set ); return keys.toArray(new DataObject[]{}); } It's also worth ...


8

n/24.0 trick won't work properly as floats are eventually rounded: >> DateTime.parse('2009-06-04 02:00:00').step(DateTime.parse('2009-06-04 05:00:00'),1.0/24){|d| puts d} 2009-06-04T02:00:00+00:00 2009-06-04T03:00:00+00:00 2009-06-04T03:59:59+00:00 2009-06-04T04:59:59+00:00 You can, however, use Rational class instead: >> ...


8

Qt container classes are largely compatible with STL. And std::set_difference allows specifying a comparator. This is very useful when you only need case insensitivity in some cases or don't want to mess with deriving standard types: struct qstring_compare_i { bool operator()(const QString & x, const QString y) const { return QString::compare(x, ...


8

You can use a list comprehension to do this for you. filtered = [i for i in A if i not in B] If the lists are both large, you might want to consider creating a set from B for faster membership lookup setB = set(B) filtered = [i for i in A if i not in setB] This solution maintains the order of A and any duplicates that exist in A.


8

First, the format of your dictionaries is not correct (: and not =): dict1 = {'hi':45, 'thanks':34, 'please':60} dict2 = {'hi':40, 'thanks':46, 'please':50} You can use a dictionary comprehension. You basically loop through one dictionary, check that the key is also in the second dictionary and insert the difference of the values in the output dictionary. ...


7

This works fine, you need to remember that the DateTime is imutable. Dim d As DateTime d = New DateTime(2010, 1, 1) d = d.AddMonths(-1) Have a look at DateTime Structure A calculation on an instance of DateTime, such as Add or Subtract, does not modify the value of the instance. Instead, the calculation returns a new instance of DateTime ...


7

You can discover keyCodes this way: Javascript Char Codes (Key Codes) Detecting keystrokes


7

You can do this as long as you use well-formed lists: s0 = "lamp, bag, mirror" s = s0.split(", ") # s is a list: ["lamp", "bag", "mirror"] If the list is not well-formed, you can do as follows, as suggested by @Lattyware: s = [item.strip() for item in s0.split(',')] Now to delete the element: s.remove("bag") s => ["lamp", "mirror"] Either way - ...


6

What if you try this? INSERT INTO tableC SELECT * FROM tableA WHERE tableA.field NOT IN (SELECT tableB.field FROM tableB) Or you can try the alternate EXISTS syntax INSERT INTO tableC SELECT * FROM tableA WHERE NOT EXISTS (SELECT * FROM tableB WHERE tableB.field = tableA.field)


6

Yipee!!! this does the trick: SELECT f.id, f.length, (f.length - ISNULL(f2.length,0)) AS diff FROM foo f LEFT OUTER JOIN foo f2 ON f2.id = (f.id +1) Please check for other cases also, it is working for the values you posted! Note this is for SQL Server 2005


6

You're getting 90 because you evaluate 50-40 before subtracting the result from 100. In this code, you're dividing the expression at the first minus: right = exp.substring(i+1, exp.length()); leftValue = Double.parseDouble(left); rightValue = subtract(right); answer = leftValue - rightValue; The rightValue is "50-40" and ...


6

You can use max and min, which are explained here: >>> lst = [23,41,54,65,73] >>> max(lst) - min(lst) 50 >>> max will get the largest number and min will get the smallest.


6

MySQL does not implement a MINUS operation - which is a unfortunate as it can allow for better execution plans in some cases than the alternatives: SELECT a.* FROM a LEFT JOIN b ON a.id=b.id WHERE b.id IS NULL or... SELECT a.* FROM a WHERE a.id NOT IN ( SELECT b.id FROM b )


6

It sounds like you want a general function which will conditionally perform a requested action. Something like this should work: function calculate(num1, num2, action) { if (action == 'add') { //... } else if (action == 'subtract') { //... } else if (action == 'multiply') { //... } else if (action == 'divide') { ...



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