Hot answers tagged

24

If you want to study termination properties in depth, programs using successor-arithmetics are an ideal study object: You know a priori what they should describe, so you can concentrate on the more technical details. You will need to understand several notions. Universal termination The easiest way to explain it, is to consider Goal, false. This ...


14

The first question (WHY) is fairly easy to spot, specially if know about left recursion. sum(A,B,C) binds A and B when C is bound, but the original program prod(A,B,C) doesn't use that bindings, and instead recurse with still A,B unbound. If we swap sum,prod we get 2 useful bindings from sum for the recursive call: sum(M, K, P) Now M is bound, and will ...


13

s/1 does not do anything in itself, and it's not really a predicate. They are just terms, a representation of the successor of their argument. So, s(0) is used to represent the successor of 0 (i.e. 1), s(s(0)) is used to represent the successor of s(0) (i.e. 2), and so on and so forth. They are so widespread in Prolog because Prolog is quite fine a language ...


8

In the context of Prolog, when you say "unification", you usually mean syntactic unification. Therefore, add(X, Y) and succ(succ(0)), do not unify (as terms), because their functors and arities differ. You seem to be referring to unification modulo theories, where distinct terms like add(X, Y) and succ(succ(0)) can be unified provided some additional ...


8

Reason for non-termination First, let us try to understand why your definition is not reversible. I will use a failure-slice to better explain it. So consider the query tree_len(X,1). At first sight, everything is perfect, you get even a nice answer! ?- tree_len(T,1). T = n(_G267, leaf, leaf) But never ask for another answer, for it will loop: ?- ...


6

First a minor issue: the common definition of plus/3 has the first and second argument exchanged which allows to exploit first-argument indexing. See Program 3.3 of the Art of Prolog. That should also be changed in your previous post. I will call your exchanged definition plusp/3 and your optimized definition pluspo/3. Thus, given plusp(X, 0, X) :- ...


6

Here is a version that terminates for the first or second argument being bound: pow2(E,X) :- pow2(E,X,X). pow2(0,s(0),s(_)). pow2(s(N),Y,s(B)) :- pow2(N,Z,B), add(Z,Z,Y). You can determine its termination conditions with cTI. So, how did I come up with that solution? The idea was to find a way how the second argument might determine the size of ...


6

It was a bit hard to understand exactly what Tom is asking here. Perhaps there's an expectation that the predicate natural_number/1 somehow influences the execution of ackermann/3. It will not. The latter predicate is purely recursive and makes no subgoals that depend on natural_number/1. When the three clauses shown are defined for ackermann/3, the ...


5

First: +1 for using lists lengths for counting, which sometimes really is quite convenient and a nice alternative for successor notation. Second: For reversible arithmetic, you typically use constraints instead of successor notation, because constraints allow you to work with actual numbers and come with built-in definitions of the usual mathematical ...


5

A Prolog program is a collection of predicates. A predicate is a collection of clauses. A clause has the form Head :- Body. meaning "Head is true if Body is true". There is a shorthand clause form Head. which means the same as Head :- true. where true is a builtin that is always true. Going back to the Body part of a clause, Body is a goal which ...


4

In SWI-Prolog, you can try ?- gtrace, your_goal. to use the graphical tracer and see what goes wrong. Instead of eq(A, add(times(Q, R), R)), you should write for example: times(Q, R, T), add(T, R, A), since you want to use the "times/3" and "add/3" predicates, instead of just calling the "eq/2" predicate with a compound term consisting of "add/2" and ...


4

Your first clause should read sum([], 0). With that change, the vacuous true return goes away and you're left with one problem: the third clause reverses the logic of summation. It should be sum([s(X)|Xs], s(Sum)) :- sum([X|Xs], Sum). because the number of s/1 terms in the left argument to sum/2 should be equal to the number of them in the right ...


4

This happends because the of evaluation order of pow2. If you switch the order of pow2, you'll have the first example stuck in infinite loop.. So you can check first if Y is a var or nonvar. Like so: times2(X,Y) :- add(X,X,Y). pow2(0,s(0)). pow2(s(N),Y) :- var(Y), pow2(N,Z), times2(Z,Y). pow2(s(N),Y) :- nonvar(Y), times2(Z,Y), pow2(N,Z).


4

Here is another solution that works "both ways" using library(clpfd) of SWI, YAP, or SICStus :- use_module(library(clpfd)). natsx_int(0, 0). natsx_int(s(N), I1) :- I1 #> 0, I2 #= I1 - 1, natsx_int(N, I2).


4

As you are looking for a recursive solution, you have to provide a base case and a recursive step. The base case you provided is almost right. However it fails because it will succeed for example when both numbers are zero. It should succeed only when the left side is of the form succ(_) and the right side is zero. The recursive step should take an element ...


4

You see, call and exit are verbs, actions that the interpreter takes attempting to solve the query you pose. Then a trace exposes details of actual work done, and lets you view it in historical perspective. When Prolog must choice a rule (a call), it uses the name you give it (so called functor), and attempts to to unify each argument in the head of the ...


4

z(0). z(s(X)) :- z(X). z(p(X)) :- z(X). z_canonized(Z, C) :- z_canonized(Z, 0, C). z_canonized(0, C,C). z_canonized(s(N), C0,C) :- z_succ(C0,C1), z_canonized(N, C1,C). z_canonized(p(N), C0,C) :- z_pred(C0,C1), z_canonized(N, C1,C). z_succ(0,s(0)). z_succ(s(X),s(s(X))). % was: z_succ(X,s(X)) :- ( X = 0 ; X = s(_) ). z_succ(p(X),X). ...


4

Your definition of add/3 works fine, and also terminates, if all three arguments are given. If you leave one of them as a variable, one of the goals s2int(XYZ, SXYZ) has then two uninstantiated variables as arguments. It describes thus an infinitely large set, whose complete enumeration takes infinitely long. Not sure what you are after, but probably you ...


4

In your definition of mult/3 the first two arguments have to be known. If one of them is still a variable, an instantiation error will occur. Eg. mult(2, X, 6) will yield an instantiation error, although X = 3 is a correct answer ; in fact, the only answer. There are several options you have: successor-arithmetics, constraints, or meta-logical predicates. ...


4

So, let's start with natural_number(P). Read this as "P is a natural number". We're given natural_number(0)., which tells us that 0 is always a natural number (i.e. there are no conditions that must be met for it to be a fact). natural_number(s(X)) :- natural_number(X). tells us that s(X) is a natural number if X is a natural number. This is the normal ...


3

In certain constraint logic programming systems you can easily see if the solution set is infinite or not. For example in some CLP(FD) implementations (i.e. SWI-Prolog, Jekejeke Minlog, other implementations such as GNU Prolog and B-Prolog not, since they assume a finite upper/lower bound) a certain degree of reasoning with infinite integer sets is thus ...


3

The best way to localize the problem is to first simplify your query: ?- sum([0],S). true ?- sum([],S). true Even for those, you get as an answer that any S will do. Like ?- sum([],s(s(0))). yes Since [] can only be handled by your fact, an error must lie in that very fact. You stated: sum([], Sum). Which means that the sum of [] is just anything. ...


3

No sure about Prolog samples, but I would define this in Haskell in the following way: {-# LANGUAGE MultiParamTypeClasses, EmptyDataDecls, FlexibleInstances, FlexibleContexts, UndecidableInstances, TypeFamilies, ScopedTypeVariables #-} data Z data S a type One = S Z type Two = S One type Three = S Two type Four = S Three class Plus x y r instance (r ~ ...


3

!/0 is quite consistently not a good solution for such problems. It typically leads to loss of valid solutions for more general queries. Instead, consider using finite domain constraints, which work perfectly well in this case: ?- use_module(library(clpfd)). true. ?- Z + Z #= 0. Z = 0. ?- Z + Z #= 0, Z #> 0. false. EDIT: A possible solution without ...


3

My attempt: simplify(X, Z) :- simplify(X, 0, Z). simplify(0, Z, Z). simplify(s(X), 0, Z) :- simplify(X, s(0), Z). simplify(p(X), 0, Z) :- simplify(X, p(0), Z). simplify(p(X), s(Y), Z) :- simplify(X, Y, Z). simplify(s(X), p(Y), Z) :- simplify(X, Y, Z). simplify(s(X), s(Y), Z) :- simplify(X, s(s(Y)), Z). simplify(p(X), p(Y), Z) :- simplify(X, p(p(Y)), Z). ...


3

Yet another answer, coded for fun of it. It first simplifies an expression into an integer and then converts the result into p(...) for negative integers, s(...) for positive integers (excluding zero), and 0 for 0. The standard sign/1 arithmetic function is used to take advantage of first-argument indexing. simplify(Expression, Result) :- ...


3

OK, another "fun" solution. This one works in ECliPSe and uses non-standard append_strings, which is a strings' analog of lists' append: simplify(X, Z) :- term_string(X, Xstr), ( append_strings(Middle, End, Xstr), ( append_strings(Begin, "s(p(", Middle) ; append_strings(Begin, "p(s(", Middle) ) ...


3

Please think declaratively: The rule numeral(succ(X)) :- numeral(X). means: If X is a numeral, then succ(X) is a numeral. :- is like an arrow used in logical implication (it looks similar to <==). Seeing that you successfully derived that 0 is a numeral (first answer), it is thus no surprise that succ(0) is another solution. I recommend you ...


3

Let me rephrase your question: The query ackermann(M,N,s(s(0))). finds two solutions and then loops. Ideally, it would terminate after these two solutions, as there is no other N and M whose value is s(s(0)). So why does the query not terminate universally? Understanding this can be quite complex, and the best advice is to not attempt to understand the ...


2

What you are looking for is called narrowing. It is implemented in some functional-logic languages such as Curry, but not in Prolog itself.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible