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92

There are several options: ps -fp <pid> cat /proc/<pid>/cmdline There is more info in /proc/<pid> on Linux, just have a look. On other Unixes things might be different. The ps command will work everywhere, the /proc stuff is OS specific. For example on AIX there is no cmdline in /proc.


65

Try this little trick to coax grep into thinking it is dealing with multiple files, so that it displays the filename: grep 'pattern' file /dev/null To also get the line number: grep -n 'pattern' file /dev/null


30

If you have the options -H and -n available (man grep is your friend): $ cat file foo bar foobar $ grep -H foo file file:foo file:foobar $ grep -Hn foo file file:1:foo file:3:foobar Options: -H, --with-filename Print the file name for each match. This is the default when there is more than one file to search. -n, ...


19

This will do the trick: xargs -0 < /proc/<pid>/cmdline Without the xargs, there will be no spaces between the arguments, because they have been converted to NULs.


11

Use uname -a in your .bashrc file.


10

Check the man page for Solaris 10 sscanf. The %m modifier is not supported there. You should also check the return value of sscanf.


8

If it's OK to concatenate files content in random order, then following command will do the trick: zcat REALTIME*.dat.gz | gzip > out.dat.gz Update This should solve order problem: zcat $(ls -t REALTIME*.dat.gz) | gzip > out.dat.gz


8

The whole source is displaying, it's just interpreting the part before the > as an HTML tag so you don't see it. View source from your browser and you'll see that your file wasn't parsed at all. That's the problem, you haven't correctly configured your web server to parse PHP at all.


7


7

On Linux cat /proc/<pid>/cmdline get's you the commandline of the process (including args) but with all whitespaces changed to NUL characters.


6

With references, creating a hierarchical data structure is only slightly tricky; the only interesting part comes from the fact that we want to handle the final level differently (assigning a value instead of creating a new hash level). # If you don't create the ref here then assigning $target won't do # anything useful later on. my $kstat = {}; open my $fh, ...


6

The space a file occupies cannot be reclaimed until all references to that file are gone. Therefore, any process that has the file open will prevent the file from being deleted from the disk. An active tail -f following the file, for example. If these files need to be deleted to free disk space (e.g. because they are very big, or there are very many of ...


6

I don't know what version this was implemented in, but my version of sleep (v6.12) accepts decimals. sleep 0.5 works. If yours is too old for that, a short python or C program would probably be your only solution.


5

nawk '{print $1}' file > newFile && mv newFile file OR cut -f1 file > newFile && mv newFile file As you're using SunOS, you'll want to get familiar with nawk (not awk, which is the old, and cranky version of awk, while nawk= new awk ;-). In either case, you're printing the first field in the file to newFile. (n)awk is a ...


5

A simple awk script ought to do it awk -F, 'BEGIN{OFS=","} { print $1,$2,$3,$4,strftime("%Y-%m-%d",$5) }' myFile.txt Cheers. EDIT: You're not using unix timestamps, but I checked your data, and it appears you're using days since the epoch, so here goes: awk -F, 'BEGIN{OFS=","} { print $1,$2,$3,$4,strftime("%Y-%m-%d",$5*86400) }' myFile.txt


5

Use prstat. The number of threads is shown in the last column (NLWP = number of lightweight processes). $ prstat -p 1124,4152,1144 PID USERNAME SIZE RSS STATE PRI NICE TIME CPU PROCESS/NLWP 1144 jlliagre 22M 11M sleep 59 0 4:16:05 2.2% multiload-apple/1 4152 jlliagre 374M 182M sleep 59 0 0:24:53 0.9% ...


5

Use the env(1) as in #!/usr/bin/env tclsh Also read the shebang article.


5

You can use perl parsing instead of shell utils my $file_cnf = $ARGV[0]; open my $fh, "<", $file_cnf or die $!; my %ini = map /(.+?)=(.+)/, <$fh>; close $fh; print "\n$ini{relogin_logs} \n $ini{dump_logs} \n $ini{final_log}\n";


4

You need to add two more array variables to keep track of the min and max. While you are at it, get rid of the grep | awk antipattern. awk -F'|' 'BEGIN { OFS="," } /EXSTAT\|/ && /\|F\|/ { a[$11]++; c[$11] += $14; if (!($11 in max)) max[$11]=min[$11]=$14; if($14 > max[$11]) max[$11]=$14; if($14 < min[$11]) min[$11]=$14; } ...


4

Try an "arp -a", and look for your own hostname. (This works for me on the Solaris 9 machine I tried it on, but your mileage may vary.)


4

On Sun OS you can use Purify, or try to port(generally you'll port the leak, too) your program to Unix/Linux and use valgrind to find the leak.


4

If you don't mind compiling a small C program, you could use: #include <utmpx.h> int main ( ) { int nBootTime = 0; int nCurrentTime = time ( NULL ); struct utmpx * ent; while ( ( ent = getutxent ( ) ) ) { if ( !strcmp ( "system boot", ent->ut_line ) ) { nBootTime = ent->ut_tv.tv_sec; } } printf ( "System ...


4

If delimiter is space character use cut -d " " -f 1 filename If delimiter is tab character , no need for -d option as tab is default delimiter for cut command cut -f 1 filename -d Delimiter; the character immediately following the -d option is the field delimiter . -f Specifies a field list, separated by a delimiter


4

It cannot be SunOS or Unix or Solaris as Solaris is a both a Unix compliant OS and an OS based on the SunOS kernel. There is no portable way to know what Operating System is running. Depending on the OS, "uname -s" will tell you what kernel you are running but not necessarily what OS release. One of these might give you the answer: cat /etc/release # ...


4

What do you want to happen when you gunzip the result? If you want the five files to reappear, then you need to use something other than the gzip (.gz) format. You would need to either use tar (.tar.gz) or zip (.zip). If you want the result of the gunzip to be the concatenation of the gunzip of the original files, then you can simply cat (not zcat or ...


3

Try this below thing. It should work YESTERDAY=`TZ=GMT+24 date +%Y%m%d`; echo $YESTERDAY


3

I'm afraid the answer is no. Even the GNU find release bundled with Solaris only take account integer seconds. You need to use custom code to manage the files modified in the same second than the reference one.


3

sh and bash can point to completely different executables. The fact that sh is a symbolic link to bash on certain systems should not make you assume the same is true everywhere. If you need bash, use it explicitly. EDIT(mpapis): Also note that even when you call bash via sh it does not behave exactly the same.


3

The proper way to include an image in the 21st century is with MIME. Your message should basically be something like From: you <you@example.net> To: recipient <victim@example.com> Subject: well, say something Mime-Version: 1.0 Content-type: multipart/related; boundary=foo Often you have something about this being a MIME message here. --foo ...


3

A rather unorthodox method might be this (helped me out since the kstat yielded some weired results that did not pass cron: RunTime="" RunTime=`kstat -p unix:0:system_misc:snaptime | awk '{print $2}' | cut -d "." -f1` echo $RunTime RunTime=`expr $RunTime / 1` RunDays=`expr $RunTime / 86400` RunHours=`expr $RunTime % 86400 / 3600` RunMinutes=`expr $RunTime % ...



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