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6

Here's the question. I wrote a test program like this: #include <sys/socket.h> int main( void ) { int sock = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_DGRAM, 0); return 0; } And tried to compile it so (this is the output that really helps, you have to remember that modern compilers really try their best to help you fix any problems): $ /tool/sunstudio/bin/cc ...


6

In the first example, suite lives on the stack, and in the second it lives on the data segment. Since suite is quite large (~75MB), the segfault is almost certainly due to your program running out of stack space. In most cases, it is best to allocate large data structures on the heap (using malloc() et al). This will also make it possible to allocate just ...


6

You just need to install the package containing these header files: # pkg install system/header


6

It's not printing only a at all. What you're seeing is instead that cout prints character type data as characters not as numbers. Your b is some character that's non-printable so cout is helpfully printing it as a blank space. You found the solution by casting it to int. EDIT: I'm pretty sure your printf is only working by chance because you told it to ...


5

-o is the name of the file that will be written to disk by the compiler -h is the name that will be recorded in ELF binaries that link against this file. One common use is to provide library minor version numbers. For instance, if you're creating the shared library libfoo, you might do: cc -o libfoo.so.1.0 -h libfoo.so.1 *.o ln -s libfoo.so.1.0 ...


5

Exception handling requires library and linker support which differs between Sun Studio C++ tool chain and Gnu C++ (In this way it is like name mangling, which you've already noted differs between the two tool chains). Using "C" linkage doesn't help you here, because the implementations of the functions you are linking to depend on that exception handling ...


5

It is not possible to load a shared library which is built with gcc into an executable built with solaris studio 12.3., if exceptions are not disabled. The problem is that exceptions are not part of the C ABI. The Solaris Studio runtime and the gcc runtime use different implementations of _Unwind calls: gcc (libstdc++ in particular) happens to use ...


4

Can you reorganize the code in the function in such a way (hopefully more logical as well) that the normal path happens at the end of the function so that a return can be used, and the exceptional path happens earlier, NOT as the last statement? EDIT: If reorganizing the function really doesn't make sense, you can always just put a dummy return 0; with a ...


4

No, it's not legitimate. The return value of g() is a temporary, but it is not const - you just can't get a non-const reference to it. The non-const member operator[] is perfectly valid to call here, and the double to integer conversion is just as safe.


4

It seems to be a known issue with Sun's std library. Your best bet may be to convince the author of the code to replace the assignment with: p1 = std::make_pair(p2.first, p2.second); Or at construction time: std::pair<char*, int> p1(p2.first, p2.second);


3

I find it a perfect spot for abort(). You should never end there, according to you, so something like: UNREACHABLE("message") which expands into: #ifdef NDEBUG #define UNREACHABLE(Message_) abort(); #else #define UNREACHABLE(Message_) assert(0 && Message_); #endif Looks appropriate


3

Looks like your actual vector is const. Is it a member variable accessed in a const member function? Is it a const function argument?


3

It doesn't give any problems with intel's fortran compiler with -check bounds; and IBM's xlf, which in my experience is extremely strict, also didn't complain with -qcheck. But more broadly, yes, there's no standard about what bounds checking should or shouldn't do. I can certainly see why some compilers would flag an assignment to a zero-length array as ...


3

It's almost certainly a predefined macro. Formally, the C and C++ standards reserve names starting with an underscore and a capital letter, or containing two underscores, for this, but practically, compilers had such symbols defined before the standard, and continue to support them, at least in their non-compliant modes which is the default mode for all of ...


3

Use something like Boost JAM which does this sort of multithreading for you - and from my experience much more efficiently than multi-threaded make.


3

This depends on what toolchain you're using. If you're using GNU Make, then add -j 32 to your make invocation to tell Make to start 32 jobs (for example) in parallel. Just make sure that you're not exhausting RAM and thrashing your swap file as a result.


3

This article says typeof is introduced in Sun Studio 12.


3

You want to put -Bstatic in front of the libs you want static link with. Dig around the Solaris Linker and Libraries Guide for more info.


3

Successfully compiled your code using "CC: Sun C++ 5.8 Patch 121017-13 2008/01/02" adding template declaration to a friend: template<class T> class M { ... template <class A> friend void ::f(M<A>, M<A>); ... }; Following is not an answer to original question but those who is looking why a friend template class ...


3

It is okay to declare a structure inside main. But in your program, the problem has got to do with the fact that you are creating 500 objects of that structure inside main function. Each object is about 15 KB in size. So, 500 objects require about 75 MB. Try printf("size: %lu\n", sizeof suite);. You don't have that much of stack available by default. You ...


3

From the Oracle documentation, you'll need to include atomic.h and use one of the following: uint_t atomic_add_int_nv(volatile uint_t *target, int delta); uint64_t atomic_cas_64(volatile uint64_t *target, uint64_t cmp, uint64_t newval); void atomic_or_32(volatile uint32_t *target, uint32_t bits); ... etc. ...


3

There is no point building a 32 bit driver when you target Solaris 11.2 as this kernel is only released as 64 bit. Both Solaris Studio and gcc can be used. The former is likely more popular for everything kernel related and you'll probably find more documentation about using it than gcc.


2

I've seen this before with the SunStudio compiler. Basically, you have a construct like this: class ACDate { public: ACDate &operator-(const ACDate &); }; class ACTime : public ACDate { public: ACTime &operator-(const ACTime &); }; Due to the C++ scoping rules, ACTime::operator- hides ACDate::operator- in the context of an ...


2

They are referring to different names. Specifically, the -o option is the file's actual name - the one on the filesystem. The -h option sets the internal DT_SONAME in the final object file. This is the name by which the shared object is referenced internally by other modules. I believe it's the name that you also see when you run ldd on objects that link to ...


2

You need to add at least -lsocket to your link-step, i.e. link against libsocket.so. I don't know how to do that in the SunStudio UI, though - are its projects makefile based? The man page is usually a good place to look for required libraries; in this case the man page for socket also recommends -lnsl (see the synopsis) so that might be required too but I ...


2

you have to link in the socket library, in the command line: -lsocket


2

Sun Studio includes parallel build support in the included dmake version of make. See the dmake manual for details.


2

The SunOS compiler is notorious for not having conformant libraries and compilation. But we do have at least one tester that uses the platform (see Sandia-sun tester). And from what you can see there are many failures in the toolset. As for setting it up the key thing to do is not use the standard STD lib, but use the STLport STD lib. As you can see from the ...


2

It must be one of the automatic macros created by the compiler. Try the same thing, replace sun by gnu and use a gcc compiler on Linux. You'll get a similar result. With gcc, you can get all the predefined macros with: echo "" | gcc -E - -dM.



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