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826

super() lets you avoid referring to the base class explicitly, which can be nice. But the main advantage comes with multiple inheritance, where all sorts of fun stuff can happen. See the standard docs on super if you haven't already. Note that the syntax changed in Python 3.0: you can just say super().__init__() instead of super(ChildB, self).__init__() ...


395

tl;dr: "PECS" is from the collection's point of view. If you are only pulling items from a generic collection, it is a producer and you should use extends; if you are only stuffing items in, it is a consumer and you should use super. If you do both with the same collection, you shouldn't use either extends or super. Suppose you have a method that takes as ...


298

The principles behind this in Computer Science is named after Covariance - ? extends MyClass, Contravariance - ? super MyClass and Invariance/non-Variance - MyClass The picture below should explain the concept. Picture courtesy : Andrey Tyukin


183

Alright, it's the usual "super() cannot be used with an old-style class". However, the important point is that the correct test for "is this a new-style instance (i.e. object)?" is >>> class OldStyle: pass >>> instance = OldStyle() >>> issubclass(instance.__class__, object) False and not (as in the question): >>> ...


134

super() can be used only in the new-style classes, which means the root class needs to inherit from the 'object' class. For example, the top class need to be like this: class SomeClass(object): def __init__(self): .... not class SomeClass(): def __init__(self): .... So, the solution is that call the parent's init method ...


132

The benefits of super() in single-inheritance are minimal -- mostly, you don't have to hard-code the name of the base class into every method that uses its parent methods. However, it's almost impossible to use multiple-inheritance without super(). This includes common idioms like mixins, interfaces, abstract classes, etc. This extends to code that later ...


121

The reason is that super() only operates on new-style classes, which in the 2.x series means extending from object.


113

super() calls the parent constructor with no arguments. It can be used also with arguments. I.e. super(argument1) and it will call the constructor that accepts 1 parameter of the type of argument1 (if exists). Also it can be used to call methods from the parent. I.e. super.aMethod() More info and tutorial here


109

It's been noted that in Python 3.0+ you can use super().__init__() to make your call, which is concise and does not require you to reference the parent OR class names explicitly, which can be handy. I just want to add that for Python 2.7 or under, you can achieve the same name-insensitive approach by writing self.__class__ instead of the class name, i.e. ...


108

Every Activity you make is started through a sequence of method calls. onCreate() is the first of these calls. Each and every one of your Activities extends android.app.Activity either directly or by subclassing another subclass of Activity. In Java, when you inherit from a class, you can override its methods to run your own code in them. A very common ...


94

The new magic super() behaviour was added to avoid violating the D.R.Y. (Don't Repeat Yourself) principle, see PEP 3135. Having to explicitly name the class by referencing it as a global is also prone to the same rebinding issues you discovered with super() itself: class Foo(Bar): def baz(self): return super(Foo, self).baz() + 42 Spam = Foo Foo ...


93

Firstly some terminology: No-args constructor: a constructor with no parameters; Accessible no-args constructor: a no-args constructor in the superclass visible to the subclass. That means it is either public or protected or, if both classes are in the same package, package access; and Default constructor: the public no-args constructor added by the ...


81

Consider the following situation: class A(object): def __init__(self): print('Running A.__init__') super(A,self).__init__() class B(A): def __init__(self): print('Running B.__init__') # super(B,self).__init__() A.__init__(self) class C(A): def __init__(self): print('Running C.__init__') ...


73

PECS (short for "Producer extends and Consumer super") can be explained by : Get and Put Principle Get And Put Principle (From Java Generics and Collections) It states, use an extends wildcard when you only get values out of a structure use a super wildcard when you only put values into a structure and don’t use a wildcard when you both get and put. ...


69

1.super() keyword is used to call immediate parent. 2.super() keyword can be used with instance members i.e., instance variables and instance methods. 3.super() keyword can be used within constructor to call the constructor of parent class. OK now let’s practically implement this points of super() keyword. Check out the difference between program 1 and ...


58

Super has no side effects Base = ChildB Base() works as expected Base = ChildA Base() gets into infinite recursion.


53

If you want to force subclasses to execute the parent class' logic, a common pattern is something like the following: public abstract class SuperClass implements SomeInterface { // This is the implementation of the interface method // Note it's final so it can't be overridden public final Object onCreate() { // Hence any logic right ...


52

This is added in the support annotation library: dependencies { compile 'com.android.support:support-annotations:22.2.0' } http://tools.android.com/tech-docs/support-annotations @CallSuper


50

Just a heads up... with Python 2.7, and I believe ever since super() was introduced in version 2.2, you can only call super() if one of the parents inherit from a class that eventually inherits object (new-style classes). Personally, as for python 2.7 code, I'm going to continue using BaseClassName.__init__(self, args) until I actually get the advantage of ...


50

In Java, the super keyword always refers to the superclass of the type in which the keyword is used, not the superclass of the dynamic type of the object on which the method is invoked. In other words, super is resolved statically, not dynamically. This means that in the context of class B, the super keyword always refers to class A, regardless of whether ...


45

No you cannot. The super() call needs to know what class the method is part of, to search the base classes for an overridden method. If you pass in self.__class__ (or better still, type(self)) then super() is given the wrong starting point to search for methods, and will end up calling its own method again. See it as a pointer in the list of classes that ...


44

"What difference is there actually in this code?:" class ChildA(Base): def __init__(self): Base.__init__(self) class ChildB(Base): def __init__(self): super(ChildB, self).__init__() The primary difference in this code is that you get a layer of indirection in the __init__ with super, which references the parent class. In ...


43

Don't make the method static. The issue is that when you invoke getClass() you are calling the method in the super class - static methods are not inherited. In addition, you are basically name-shadowing Object.getClass(), which is confusing. If you need to log the classname within the superclass, use return this.getClass().getName(); This will return ...


43

super is a keyword in Java. It refers to the immediate parents property. super() //refers parent's constructor super.getMusic(); //refers to the parent's method - Read More on super


42

super Essentially, it allows you to use the implementations of the current class' superclass. For the gritty details of the Objective-C runtime: [super message] has the following meaning: When it encounters a method call, the compiler generates a call to one of the functions objc_msgSend, objc_msgSend_stret, objc_msgSendSuper, or ...


40

The keyword super doesn't "stick". Every method call is handled individually, so even if you got to SuperClass.method1() by calling super, that doesn't influence any other method call that you might make in the future. That means there is no direct way to call SuperClass.method2() from SuperClass.method1() without going though SubClass.method2() unless ...


39

super to bound a named type parameter (e.g. <S super T>) as opposed to a wildcard (e.g. <? super T>) is ILLEGAL simply because even if it's allowed, it wouldn't do what you'd hoped it would do, because since Object is the ultimate super of all reference types, and everything is an Object, in effect there is no bound. In your specific example, ...


36

Are you reloading modules somehow in the middle of things? If so, that may explain this error. isinstance(self,DBAdminConnection) may become false after reloading modules because of the changes to memory references, apparently. Edit: if you're running your web.py app under mod_wsgi, make sure you're disabling autoreload: app = web.application(urls, ...


35

super in this case (without parentheses) is a special form. It calls the superclass method with the original params. Instead try calling super()


32

Change your code to this and I think it'll explain things (presumably super is looking at where, say, B is in the __mro__?): class A(object): def __init__(self): print "A init" print self.__class__.__mro__ class B(A): def __init__(self): print "B init" print self.__class__.__mro__ super(B, self).__init__() ...



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