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1

Why does it call super (constructor of Object class.I know it does constructor chaining)?. For what reasons it is required ? Consider this example: class A { protected String s; A () { this.s = "hello"; } } class B extends A { public String get() { return s;// s is inherited from A } } // A's default constructor is invoked here ...


1

A class always is a chain of classes, and always ending with Object (where Object is the only exception; it has no super class). If a new instance is created, than all the classes in the chain must be initialized, otherwise their state would be undefined. This also applies to classes that seem not to need initialization (like Object). Initialization is ...


1

Every constructor must call either a different constructor of the same class or a constructor of its direct super class. The call to the super class constructor is added implicitly if you don't call it explicitly. Since an instance of a class inherits the state of its ancestors, it must initialize it by calling the constructors of its ancestors. In your ...


0

Just ran the code, It looks like your code is throwing a "FileNotFoundExeption". What you have to do to fix this is place the file that you are looking for into the workspace you are working in. You can either save the txt file into your workspace or specify where the txt file is located. Example: C:Programs/documents/Alice... good luck!


0

The method() in your code seems to be a static method on your OtherClass. In general, to make it explicitly clear for anyone reading your code that you are invoking a static method on a class within your object's hierarchy, you can prefix the call with the class' name: OtherClass.method() (as discussed in this answer) If you're not overriding the static ...


2

They are not "more correct"/"standard", both methods calls have completely different meaning as they call different methods: SomeClass.method(); calls method method() of the SomeClass (and the method() must be declared static for it to work) SomeClass.super.method(); calls method method() of the OtherClass. Similarly, use method() to call the method() ...


3

Consider this: public class T2 { protected int x = 2; } /* in a different package */ public class T3 extends T2 { int x = 3; void test() { System.out.println(this.x); // prints 3 System.out.println(super.x); // prints 2 T2 this_as_t2 = (T2)this; System.out.println(this_as_t2.x); // Error: Can't access protected ...


0

Doing the same thing is not the same as being the same thing. The compiler isn't going to check that you took care of what super is supposed to do. It's just going to insist that you call it when it's required.


1

Your class test has an explicit constructor. You must use this constructor in a constructor of every sub class. If test did not have an explicit constructor, an implicit constructor with no arguments would be generated, and you wouldn't have to explicitly invoke this in the sub class. In this situation, your second constructor would be perfectly valid. ...


0

The constructor of your class will always call one of the superclass constructors. You can make the call explicit with super (first instruction of the constructor), and in that case you can chose which constructor you will call. If you do not explicitly use super, it will try to use the default (parameterless) constructor. But your superclass do not have ...


0

As the error clearly tells you, you must call a base class constructor, or the base class will not be constructed. Doing the same thing as the base class constructor is not enough; you must actually call it. If the base class has a parameterless constructor (eg, the default constructor provided if you don't write any), you can leave it out, and the ...


0

public TeamLeader(String name, String number, String hd, int shift, double rate, double monthlyBonus, double RTH, double CTH) { super(name, number, hd, shift, rate); this.monthlyBonus = monthlyBonus; this.RTH = RTH; this.CTH = CTH; } You are not setting the passed RTH to ...


0

You're calling the parent (super) constructor, but it doesn't take RTH or CTH, and you never set RTH and CTH on your TeamLeader object.


3

You never call the setters of CTH and RTH. You pass their values to your constructor but don't use them. Add to your constructor setting of CTH and RTH : public TeamLeader(String name, String number, String hd, int shift, double rate, double monthlyBonus, double RTH, double CTH) { super(name, number, hd, shift, rate); this.monthlyBonus = ...


4

this is an object reference; it refers to the current object in an instance-specific method or constructor. The type of this is the class of the current instance. this is also special in that if you have a nested class, you can qualify this to refer to an enclosing class. So it's not just an object reference. super is a special keyword which mostly acts ...


1

I found a partial answer in Java Lanaguage Specification : The type of this is the class or interface type T within which the keyword this occurs.


0

this is a reference to the object typed as the current class, and super is a reference to the object typed as its parent class.


-1

In Java, objects are referred as reference (similar to C++ pointer). If X is superclass, from within X's non-static member method, this refers to as X this, and if Y is a subclass of X, from within Y, every non-static member method within Y gets an additional implicit argument as Y this and X sub-object of Y is referred to as super from within every ...


0

There are no pointers in java,You have references to objects. this refers to current object. You can access instance members and methods of same class object using this


0

You can access class attributes and methods by using this keyword. Super is for ancestor class attributes and methods.


0

In Java, each keyword has its own meaning ... for example to define a new class, we use 'class' keyword. Each keyword is reserved to do a particular thing. Basically when you type a keyword, it is an instruction to jvm and jvm knows what needs to be done on an encounter with a particular keyword. Same way super() is designed to be called with in a subclass ...


1

Consider the following case: class Father { Father() {} } class Son extends Father { Son() { super(); } void foo() { super(); //won't compile } } You can write Father f = new Father(); to construct a Father, but you can't illegally write super f = super(). Otherwise two problems occur: (1) what is super? How should ...


3

Well, you only have one input. So.. public class GateNot extends Gate { public GateNot(Wire input, Wire output) { super("Not", new ArrayList<Wire>(Arrays.asList(input)), output); } } Edit: I realised you have a List<> instead of an ArrayList<> so we can simplify this to: public class GateNot extends Gate { public ...


1

Isn't it already first statement? Yes. But the message says: "Constructor call must be the first statement in a constructor." ... and public void car(...) is NOT a constructor for Car. Rather, it is a method called car which has been declared as returning nothing. Lessons: A constructor's name must be identical to the name of the class. A ...


2

No. The constructor of your class must be named "Car". You have a method "car" (lower case), so super is not the first statement of a constructor.


1

Your "stus" variable is only in scope inside the main() method, so you can't access it outside of that method. Furthermore, "stus" is an array, so it doesn't even make sense to call getId on it. Further, notice that getId refers to a variable since it doesn't have parenthesis after it. Keep in mind that in your toString() method, you're already "inside" a ...


0

What Java calls a super class is called a base class in C#. The base keyword functions like the super keyword in Java, referencing the base class. In Java, when adding X to a JFrame, X has access to the JFrame it has been added to, through the "super" keyword. The way you describe it would not work in C# and I have my doubts about Java. The ...


0

The call super.remove(this); in Java means "call method remove() defined in the superclass, and pass this object as remove's parameter". In C#, keyword base is used instead. Assuming that an identical method is defined in the base class, you call it like this: base.Remove(this);



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