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25

SurfaceFlinger is not what draws your window. It allocates a frame buffer for your window, which the framework running in your application draws directly to without interacting with SurfaceFlinger. The only interaction SurfaceFlinger is involved with when you draw your window is to composite the final new frame buffer to the screen once you are done ...


15

Yes, SurfaceFlinger is Android's compositor so it takes everything that will get displayed, figures out what the resulting frame will look like and then sends it off to be displayed on the screen via the graphics card's EGL interface. You can get the idea that it controls the result of everything you see in a post by Android developer Jeff Sharkey where he ...


13

The answers to these and many other questions can now be found on the Android Open Source Project web site: Android System-Level Graphics The document begins with an explanation of the low-level infrastructure, and then explains how the higher-level features are built from them. The goal is not to provide direct answers to common questions, but rather to ...


11

To understand this stuff, it's best to start with the System-Level Graphics Architecture document, taking particular note of The Need for Triple-Buffering section and the associated diagram (which ideally would be an animated GIF). The sentence that begins, "If the app starts rendering halfway between VSYNC signals" is talking specifically about DispSync. ...


9

http://pierrchen.blogspot.jp/2014/02/what-is-surfaceflinger-in-android.html SurfaceFlinger is an Android system service, responsible for compositing all the application and system surfaces into a single buffer that is finally to be displayed by display controller. Let's zoom in above statement. SurfaceFlinger is a system wide service but it ...


8

Ok, I have enough figured out to answer my own question, but if anyone has any additional input, please leave them in the comments. There's some additional stuff encountered which I'll note below that still isn't clear. First, the link below helps explain a few things about how image rendering and compositing happens through SurfaceFlinger: ...


6

There's three ways to do surface composition: Using "overlay" planes. Most recent devices will compose up to four planes as the pixels are being sent to the display. This is (usually) the most efficient way to do surface composition. It's required for DRM video, because there's currently no way for GLES to compose "secure" surfaces. On the GPU, using ...


5

I am also getting this error. I believe it is to do with Samsung's TouchWiz and not part of your code, are you running it on a Samsung device?


4

(1) Assuming you're using OpenGL ES, the app queues up commands to the GL driver, which renders output to a buffer. The Surface is a pool / queue of buffers that are shared between a producer and a consumer; in this case, the app is the producer, and SurfaceFlinger the consumer. For GLES rendering to a Surface, the pool will have two or three buffers (i.e. ...


2

frameworks/base/libs/surfaceflinger/tests/resize/resize.cpp is a good place to start. But my version (Eclair from vendor) of the test app is out-dated, some Surface API has been moved to SurfaceControl and you have to: SurfaceComposerClient::createSurface() => SurfaceControl SurfaceControl->getSurface() => Surface Secondly use ...


2

The only way to bypass SurfaceFlinger is to root your device and shut the entire application framework down. You then have to interface with the hardware composer HAL -- simply using the framebuffer dev won't work on all devices. SurfaceFlinger's behavior is very predictable so long as nothing much else is going on. There's always something else going on, ...


2

Further to my question, I investigated the codecs exposed as part of AOSP distribution and have found that the top-3 vendors viz., Qualcomm, Samsung and TI have adopted an internal color conversion to handle the Surface recording scenario. Some useful links are as below: Qualcomm's V4L2 based codec implementation: Handling of RGBA_8888 buffers in ...


2

SurfaceFlinger is written in C++. You can find the source code in AOSP, and some information in the docs.


2

Some observations... Mobile devices, particularly those based on Qualcomm chips, aggressively reduce the CPU clocks to minimize power consumption. Sometimes their policies are a bit heavy-handed. They also try to reduce the number of active cores to the number needed to handle the current workload. Looking at the systrace output, just at the "CPU n" ...


2

As far as accessible APIs go, it sounds like you've found the relevant bits and pieces. If you haven't yet, please read through this stackoverflow item. Using Choreographer and extrapolation, you can guess at when the next display refresh will occur. Using eglPresentationTimeANDROID() on an Android 5.0+ device, you can tell SurfaceFlinger when you want a ...


1

The SurfaceFlinger process can know that it is receiving frames at a consistent rate, but it can't know if it's a video or just app animation. The mediaserver process is responsible for managing the hardware video decoders. It can know if a video is being decoded, but it can't know if the video is being displayed. It won't be involved if the app is using ...


1

An example of adding an overlay is built into the screenrecord sources for Lollipop. As far as I can recall it doesn't rely on any features added in Lollipop, so you should be able to build and run it on 4.4. As noted on bigflake, the --bugreport mode was added to AOSP in the 4.4 time frame, but didn't actually ship with the system until 5.x. (With a ...


1

Could be because OpenGL's (0,0) point is at the bottom-left of the screen.. whereas the higher-level windowing API assumes (0,0) is the top-left.


1

It would help to have the dumpsys output in your question, but I can make a couple of general observations. display[0] is the device's built-in display. display[1] is an "external" display, in your case HDMI. These two indices are hard-wired. (Well, they were as of KitKat; I don't know if they've since un-hard-wired things.) Virtual displays start at ...


1

Since this is a top result on Google for "frame rate statistics on android" I'm going to offer another suggestion. dumpsys gfxinfo clears that buffer each time you access it, so you if you poll it you can collect data as long as you like.


1

sendFormatChange=>kWhatOutputFormatChange=>MEDIA_SET_VIDEO_SIZE=> ... =>native_window_set_buffers_dimensions Just a clarification, lets use QC example, component recognize crop change - look for OMX_IndexConfigCommonOutputCrop here omx_vdec, then ACodec clears mSentFormat this makes ACodec to call sendFormatChange which sends kWhatOutputFormatChange event ...


1

You don't need to do this. If you do, your buffering will be redundant with the buffering the operating system is doing for you, and will just be adding latency and overhead. You can learn about the current Android graphics architecture from this page. Older versions of Android were much different, but the notion of double- or triple-buffering has been ...


1

The SurfaceFlinger process does not start or stop while applications are running. If it does, the system restarts. It sounds like you're interested in knowing the latency between when you touch the screen, and when the results of that touch are visible. You can use systrace to observe the various events, though this requires a fair understanding of the ...


1

See the Android System-Level Graphics document. In particular, the SurfaceView section has a sub-section on use of the hardware scaler that addresses this, but I recommend reading the full thing if you want to understand the details. Most content is rendered 1:1 for best quality. Apps can choose to scale up a SurfaceView for performance reasons. The ...


1

You could use this app. It measures FPS of any game in the play store. It also records screenshots so you can understand what was happening when the FPS Drops.


1

If it is the newer Nexus 7 with the snapdragon chip you could consider using the Adreno Profiler from their site. You'll have to make an account first though.


1

If SurfaceFlinger isn't running, you can just open the framebuffer device and write to it (assuming you're on a device that has a framebuffer device). For an example of this, see the implementation of the "recovery" UI. The key file there is minui/graphics.c. The current implementation relies on libpixelflinger. Using OpenGL ES / EGL will be a bit more ...


1

The purgatory list went away in Android 4.3 (API 18). As near as I can tell the error associated with the message you're seeing was simply ignored. The list was part of a cleanup mechanism used when graphical layers are destroyed (possibly to avoid destroying a buffer that's still being composited). I think the error means that somebody requested deletion ...


1

You don't want or need the final composited video data. To record the camera preview, you can just feed it into a MediaCodec (requires Android 4.1, API 16). In Android 4.3 (API 18) this got significantly easier with some tweaks to MediaCodec and the introduction of the MediaMuxer class. See this page for examples, especially CameraToMpegTest. It is ...


1

Systrace is not useful for measuring FPS overall, but you can do that trivially with a frame counter and System.nanoTime(). If you're not hitting your target framerate, though, it can help you figure out why not. The official docs provide some useful pointers, but there's a lot of information and the interactions can be complex. The key things to know ...



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