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31

Trying to answer my question: using git for svn merges seems promising. Update: it's not just promising, it's a great success. In short, Linus was right. Just completed a huge merge of 2 svn branches that have been apart for 1.5 years; 3k files were changed, got tons of conflicts in svn (~800 I think). I found git & git-svn a life saver: ...


7

What client do you use? TortoiseSVN has a nifty feature that takes advantage of the changelist feature built into SVN. If you right click on a modified folder and choose "Check for Modifications," you can right-click on any of the modified files in that dialog and choose "Add to Changelist -> ignore-on-commit." From then on, whenever you perform a commit ...


4

I've had the same problem a few days ago, and today I have finally found an answer (workaround). You need to connect to repository of internet using, for example, TortoiseSVN, it will ask you for proper credentials and store them along with SSL certificate. After that you can try to set mirror using SVK - it will use previously stored credentials and SSL ...


3

You could use git-svn. You get a local repo in which you can have local history, and several opportunities to consider your sins before inflicting them on the svn repo.


3

I've just worked through this myself. A simpler method is to pass git merge the --squash option, which will perform the merge without recording a merge commit, keeping the history linear so as not to confuse git-svn. My merge was also very large, and I had to set git config diff.renamelimit 0 so that git would correctly find all the renames.


2

There are new tools available that fix many issues of git-svn and provide much better experience for using both Subversion and Git. Among other things these tools fix some branching and merging problems. Here is an overview: git-svn From the documentation: CAVEATS ... Running git merge or git pull is NOT recommended on a branch you plan to ...


2

For a private repository, you should try P5


2

I generally try to arrange things so the standard files SVN checks out can be overridden by a separate file which is svn:ignore-ed For example, I have a bash script which starts a Jetty web server using a config file. Normally it is jetty.xml, but if jetty-local.xml is present on the filesystem, that's used instead. (Of course, the obvious problem there is ...


1

When I have a situation like this, I add the files that I do not want to check in to a change set labelled "DO NOT CHECK IN". My SVN client (SmartSVN, although Tortoise does also suuprt this) can then be set to ignore that change set, meaning that I don't accidentally check in those changes. The only downside to this is when you have made changes to files ...


1

Ok, I figured it out: # create a local svn repo cd $HOME/src/svk svnadmin create foosvn # mirror that in svk svk mirror file://$HOME/src/svk/foosvn //mirror/foosvn svk sync //mirror/foosvn # finally, merge your local svk path into the new svn repo svk smerge --incremental --baseless //local/foo //mirror/foosvn # Just to be sure things migrated properly: ...


1

Just needed svk up -s, answer found here: Working with SVK in a multi-user environment ... svk up is not enough to ensure that your depot reflects the latest changes in the remote repository. Instead you must perform an svk sync (see svk help sync for information about options) to bring the local depot up to date, or pass the -s switch to ...


1

Why use SVK to mirror Perforce? Surely using a Perforce Proxy is the best way to make your repository distributed?



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