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53

I am the author of the quote in the question, which came from a previous answer. Jason is right to be suspicious of brief statements such as mine, and to ask for an explanation. Of course, if I fully explained everything in that answer, I would need to have written a book. Mike is also right to point out that one of the problems with an svn:external-like ...


41

I don't think this is an anti-pattern at all. I did a few quick searches on google and came up with basically nothing... nobody is complaining that using svn:externals is bad or harmful. Of course there are some caveats that you have to be aware of... and it's not something that you should just sprinkle heavily into all of your repositories... but as for the ...


27

It appears that the functionality of the Forest Extension is being implemented into core Mercurial (as of 1.3). http://mercurial.selenic.com/wiki/subrepos Currently marked as "experimental" but perhaps will be the route to handle svn:external -type functionality as of v1.4.


20

There's no good way to do it using mercurial only. The Forest Extension mentioned elsewhere causes more problems that in fixes nowadays. Most folks just use a large repo and include all their components in the repo and then have their build scripts download and use 3rd party libraries -- using maven if they're Java-heads. Short answer "fake it in your ...


16

The main risk with using svn:externals is that the referenced repository will be changed in a way that breaks your code or introduces a security vulnerability. If the external repository is also under your control, then this may be acceptable. Personally, I only use svn:externals to point to "stable" branches of a repository that I own.


15

Yes, it's possible with svn 1.6. It's documented in the nightly build version of the svn book. But even though file externals are working, you should only do it with text files (for now) because binary files won't work correctly as file externals.


13

An old thread, but I want to address the concern that a changing external could break your code. As pointed out previously, this is most often due to an incorrect usage of the external property. External references should, in almost all instances, point to a specific revision number in the external repository URI. This ensures that the external will never ...


12

Unfortunately, svn's externals are quite flexible. I've run across a number of scripts that treat them as <path> <url>, but <url> <path> is also allowed. So I think some of the scripts are just broken in that regard. To answer your second subquestion: no. 'git svn fetch' needs to operate on a subtree of Subversion's repo, but it ...


10

I believe part of the problem is that the release cycles for the shared components don't necessarily match the release cycles for the projects. Shared components as described here have their own release cycle. In other words each one could be managed as a separate project (or perhaps the collection of them managed as a separate project) with a ...


9

The fundamental difference is the composition rule. In a true component-based approach, you define a configuration, that is: The list of labels (of SHA1 commits for Git) you need for your project to "work" (i.e. "develop", "compile", "deploy", ...). Each commit referenced in a configuration help you to get the exact versions of a all tree. There is no ...


8

You should use relative externals(available since SVN 1.5): either use "../" as a relative to the current path or use "^/" relative to the root of your repository. You also may has to delete (or move away) the current content of the folder with the external, so that an update can write the data to disk (remember: SVN will not overwrite existing files)


7

There are definite flaws in subversion externals, but we seem to use them reasonably successfully for including libraries (both our own and vendor) that the current project depends on. So I don't see them as an "anti-pattern". The important usage points for me are: They point to a specific revision or tag (never the head) of the other project. They are ...


7

If plain external is an anti-pattern because it can break your repository, then one with explicit revision should'nt. Excerpt from svn book: An externals definition is a mapping of a local directory to the URL**—and possibly a particular revision—**of a versioned resource. I think it's all depend your purpose of using the feature, it is not an ...


7

What you’re really asking is, “Can you specify --depth for svn:externals” and the answer is no. Externals currently are fully recursive on the specified directory. Issue 3216 requests this functionality, but it doesn’t look like it’s coming any time soon.


7

Have a look at the SVN manual: Mobile.framework svn+ssh://../Mobile.embeddedframework@100 - note the @100. (or) svn propedit svn:externals . can help you edit it.


6

I agree with @Ken. I'd very strongly recommend against using svn:externals at all without a specific revision. Without a revision, it is impossible to recreate old checkouts. If you only pin your externals when tagging, you will only be able to recreate what you've tagged. If you want to recreate some intermediate revision in trunk, you're on your own. One ...


6

The word in the #mercurial IRC channel is that subrepos will continue to work as they do, and support will grow. For example currently the 'hg status' command isn't subrepo aware -- it works, it just doesn't recurse, but that in the future it will be. However, the current behaviors, fileformats (.hgsub and .hgsubstate) will only be changed in backward ...


6

SVN externals also have a lot to do with project organization. Externals can be completely different SVN repos, which means you can set up different types of security, protection, access, pre-commit hooks, post-commit hooks, etc... It's difficult to do different levels of access for different folders inside of a single SVN repo (without the help of something ...


6

What you want sounds like a "vendor branch" scenario to me. current repository root |-- myproject | -- mycode | -- library -> svn:externals to a remote svn or your own libraryproject suggested repository root |-- myproject | -- mycode | -- library -> copied/branched from ^/vendor/library/current (modified at this ...


5

I stated this on a similar question: You should use svn:externals as external references from different repositories. So svn:externals should refer to components, modules, 3rd party tools, etc. which reside in different repositories. You should not use svn:externals to emulate a "symbolic link"-behaviour by using externals to point into the same repository. ...


5

The recommended best practice is to always use an explicit revision (not HEAD) in externals definitions. From the documentation: You should seriously consider using explicit revision numbers in all of your externals definitions. Doing so means that you get to decide when to pull down a different snapshot of external information, and exactly which ...


5

No, it is not possible. SVN externals simply does an checkout or update on the repository path you give it. Which doesn't support CVS. SVN Book Chapter on Externals The only thing you should point at CVS is a gun.. or cvs2svn. Long live SVN!


5

If I understand you, you want to make sure that foo and bar share the same branch. foo is your master project and has an svn:externals on it somewhere pointing to bar. When you branch foo, you want to make sure bar is using the same branch. The only way to ensure that is to create your repository with the tags and branches directories at the root of your ...


5

The quick and dirty way, if it's just a few changes, is to use svn propget with the --recursive flag to get the properties, and make the changes manually (this might take a while to return): svn propget --recursive svn:externals http://your.svn.server/ | grep -B 5 To do this in a more automated fashion you can script it: recursively retrieve ...


5

I think this is because you can't use external files feature between two different repositories (RepoA and repoB in your example). Have a look to this limitation in the official doc: http://tortoisesvn.net/docs/nightly/TortoiseSVN_en/tsvn-dug-externals.html Abstract: The URL for a file external must be in the same repository as the URL that the file ...


4

Using Externals in Subversion, you can have your master project refer to all the dependency projects. By default, an external reference in Subversion refers to whatever the current version is, but you can add an external reference that refers to a specific version of another repository (using the -r notation as in the "toolkit" example on that page).


4

The way you use externals is for people who want to work on the head revision of some code, for example if you are on an internal project where all kinds of libraries and applications are co-developed. Usually, you should not do this without good reason, because a code revision in an external might break your code - and if you have no right to fix the ...


4

You can do a git-svn clone of your svn repo, and then include that repo into your main Git repo, declaring it as a submodule. Simply remember: git submodules are not compatible with svn submodules, in that they always refer a fixed version. See: "Why are git submodules incompatible with svn externals?" "git submodule svn external" However, as I ...


4

"git svn show-ignore" performs an additional SVN request per directory. For migration purposes maybe you would like to have a look at SubGit tool. It translates svn:ignore -> .gitignore for every revision (and also it translates svn:eol-style, tags and so on). The only restriction: it requires local access SVN to repository. So it might be used in ...


4

You can write an executable script that serves as your prop-editor. It will get as its first argument ($1 on unix-like systems) a temporary file name with the current value of the property being edited. You modify the contents of the file in the script - and that's the new value of the property. You pass your script as svn propedit <pro-name> ...



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