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42

The general solution (works regardless of the R version): Rscript -e "library(knitr); knit('myfile.Rmd')" Since R 3.1.0, R CMD Sweave has started to support non-Sweave documents (although the command name sounds a little odd), and the only thing you need to do is to specify a vignette engine in your document, e.g. %\VignetteEngine{knitr::knitr} To see ...


21

If you have read the motivation of the knitr package, you probably know I'm the person who hates round() inside \Sexpr{} most. I suggested this to R core long time ago for Sweave but it was ignored, so I started my own package. Although the answer by Josh O'Brien is absolutely correct, I should say you really only need options(digits = 2) with knitr, and ...


20

I have a knitme.R script: library(knitr) render_html() source("hooks.R") # mods to defaults inFile = commandArgs(trailingOnly=TRUE)[1] outFile = commandArgs(trailingOnly=TRUE)[2] knit(inFile,output=outFile) so I can then do Rscript knitme.R $SOURCE $TARGET Where $SOURCE and $TARGET are as required. You could also integrate this into Make, so you had a ...


19

Just to tie this up with a nice little bow at the time of current writing, the best existant tutorials on publication-quality tables and usage scenarios appear to be an amalgamation of these documents: A Sweave example (source) The Joy of Sweave: A Beginner's Guide to Reproducible Research with Sweave (source) Latex and R via Sweave: An example document ...


18

qplot() produces objects, not a graphic output. It might seem like it does when you run it, but that's because without assignment, R is automatically printing the output of qplot(). To integrate it into Sweave, either wrap print() around qplot(), or assign the output of qplot() to something, then wrap that in print(). ... <<fig = T, echo = F>>= ...


18

I would take a slightly different approach to this, since using global variables reduces the reproducibility of the analysis. I use brew + sweave/knitr to achieve this. Here is a simple example. # brew template: "template.brew" \documentclass{article} \begin{document} <<>>= print(<%= x %>) @ \end{document} # function to write report ...


17

The best way I have found to do this is to indicate the table column as a "fixed width" column so that the text inside it wraps. With the xtable package, this can be done with: align( calqc_xtable ) <- c( 'l', 'p{1.5in}', rep('c',5) ) xtable demands that you provide an alignment for the option "rownames" column- this is the initial l specification. ...


17

I think options(prompt = " ") at the top of your script will do it. prompt (in options()) controls the text string used for the prompt in an interactive session and I'm assuming it will do the same for a document processed through Sweave. EDIT: Thanks to Ben Bolker for pointing out that options(prompt = " ", continue = " ") will also take care of the "+" ...


17

Here is what works very well for me: I have one master file ("master.Rnw") that has no text but only serves to collect the files (chapters, sections) which form the document in the end. Then I have one file with R code that is being reused in various other files ("func.Rnw"). Here, I have lot of named chunks <<my_fun_1,eval=FALSE,echo=FALSE>>= ...


17

You can use something like a for loop with a global variable changing, which controls which city you want to weave into the report; see the other post Run Sweave or knitr with objects from existing R session The code will be like (suppose cities is a character vector, and I use the knitr package as an example because you can specify the filename of the ...


16

I have written a Python implementation of Sweave called Pweave that implements basic functionality and some options of Sweave for Python code embedded in reST or Latex document. You can get it here: http://mpastell.com/pweave and see the original blog post here: http://mpastell.com/2010/03/03/pweave-sweave-for-python/


16

Just add this to the top of the first chunk: options(prompt=" ",continue=" ") You can get back any moment with: options(prompt="> ",continue="+ ")


15

I don't believe that there's a direct equivalent, so Romain Francois's suggestion (in your link) is probably the best. You might also want to consider the following: Have a look at PyLit and PyReport which are intended for literate programming with Python. Sphinx is great for documenting with python, and can output LaTex. Here's a list of tools for ...


15

Since you showed interest in the knitr package, I spent some time implementing this feature, and you can download the development version from https://github.com/yihui/knitr. As I said, cacheSweave does not preserve any side effects; the current stable version of knitr on CRAN only preserves the side effects of printing, and the side effects of loading ...


13

Dexy is a very similar product to Sweave. One advantage of Dexy is that it is not exclusive to one single language. You could create a Dexy document that included R code, Python code, or about anything else.


13

Try adding this to your emacs init file: (add-to-list 'ispell-skip-region-alist '("^<<.*>>=" . "^@")) Edit (Re Michael Hoffman's comments): If Flyspell is enabled, these two additional expressions will also be needed: (defun flyspell-eligible () (let ((p (point))) (save-excursion (cond ((re-search-backward ...


12

As for the first question, the easy way is to set keep.source=TRUE in SweaveOpts. For more fancy control, see fancyvrb and FAQ #9 of Sweave manual. The width of the figure can be set by \setkeys{Gin}{width=1.0\textwidth} here is a slight modification: ... snip ... \SweaveOpts{pdf=TRUE, echo=FALSE, fig=FALSE, eps=FALSE, tidy=T, width=4, height=4, ...


12

I kind of like this as my standard header wrapped around your document: \documentclass{tufte-handout} \usepackage{amsmath} % extended mathematics \usepackage{booktabs} % book-quality tables \usepackage{units} % non-stacked fractions and better unit spacing \usepackage{multicol} % multiple column layout facilities \usepackage{lipsum} % filler text ...


12

The xtable package has some examples of how to generate tables - see vignette. When you're writing a chunk, make sure you set the chunk to <<results=tex>>. See Sweave example, for instance, this. This is how I would output a data.frame. <<results=tex>> xtable(my.data.frame) @ And the raw result would looks something like this: ...


12

As of 2012 knitr provides a perfect solution to this problem. For example, create a file with an rmd extension. Wrap your code in a couple of commands as follows: ```{r} x <- rnorm(100) y <- jitter(x) print(summary(x)) print(head(data.frame(x,y))) cor(x,y) plot(x,y) print(summary(lm(y~x))) ``` You can convert it into a self-contained HTML file in ...


11

I would recommend saving the results as two separate tables in different files (see the file= option to print.xtable()), and then input them into your LaTeX document with any command you find appropriate for your layout (tabular, subfloat, minipage, etc.). This is what I do in general, although I generally rely on LaTeX facilities in the Hmisc package. ...


11

I think this is really a LaTeX question, which I simply Googled and ended up with a simple answer from tex.stackexchange.com here. Try this (untested in LaTeX; will be curious if this compiles the way you want): print(x.big,tabular.environment='longtable', floating=FALSE, hline.after = c(-1,nrow(x.big)), add.to.row = list(pos = ...


11

Without the code of the two functions you created it remains unclear what is going wrong. However, if you use either lattice or ggplot2 not calling print on the object that that came out of ggplot2 or lattice. On the command line these kinds of plots work because print is then called implicitely. So: print(site_rose(site_ref)) Should produce the correct ...


11

as suggested in the xtable gallery vignette you should use a sanitization function (as unikum also suggested). Just some dummy code how I got it working with your example: library(xtable) adf.results<-matrix(0,ncol=6,nrow=4) colnames(adf.results) <- c(" ", "$m^r_t$", "$\\delta p_t$","$R^r_t$", "$R^b_t$", "$y^r_t$") ...


10

I use a Makefile of the following form for my Sweave documents: pdf: myfile.tex R CMD texi2pdf myfile.tex myfile.tex: myfile.Rnw R CMD Sweave myfile.Rnw Then I can build the document in one step in the Mac OS Terminal by running the command make pdf I'm sure there is a way to bring this closer to your one-click goal in Mac OS X, but this works ...


10

Thanks for the question. I had wondered myself about the code behind that 'automagical' process. R CMD Sweave --pdf ultimately calls tools::texi2dvi, which: Run[s] latex and bibtex until all cross-references are resolved and create[s] either a dvi or PDF file. (See here for more texi2dvi details). Here is the chain of events set into motion by an R ...


10

I think this function should work: sn <- function(x,digits) { if (x==0) return("0") ord <- floor(log(abs(x),10)) x <- x / 10^ord if (!missing(digits)) x <- format(x,digits=digits) if (ord==0) return(as.character(x)) return(paste(x,"\\\\times 10^{",ord,"}",sep="")) } Some tests: > sn(2000000) [1] "2\\\\times 10^{6}" > ...


10

Two issues here; first, you need a double backslash as otherwise it treats it as a control sequence. Second, by default, xtable sanitizes text so that it won't break LaTeX. Use one of the sanitize. parameters to control this; to do no sanitizing, pass it the identity function. colnames(mytable) <- "$\\beta_0$" print(xtable(mytable), include.rownames = ...


9

A few other R users I talked to use a 'one-directory-per-project' setup, and a simple Makefile. As you suspected, that works well with Emacs/ESS. I tend to just call a simple shell script sweave which I wrote before before 'R CMD Sweave' was added (as I find re-creating or copying the Makefile unappealing, YMMV). I also use Emacs and an auto-refreshing ...


9

Add the keep.source option to the code chunk options and set it to true <<foo,keep.source=TRUE>>= query <- ' SELECT category, count(FID) AS Number FROM film_list GROUP by category' @ Which is processed to this in the latex sources: \begin{Schunk} \begin{Sinput} > query <- ' + SELECT category, count(FID) AS Number + FROM film_list + ...



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