Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

3

The error reported by your Python is very clear. function 'plop' not found This means that the DLL does not export a function of that name. So, you need to export the function. Either with a .def file, or using __declspec(dllexport): extern "C" { __declspec(dllexport) int plop(); } To inspect your DLL to debug issues like this, use dumpbin or ...


2

You will not be able to just export SIMD functions to Python like that. For starters, Python has its own way of representing floating point numbers (and not a very efficient one). Even if it worked, all the vectorization performance gains would be lost in the SWIG interface. I suggest you move out your performance-critical calculation as a whole to C, if ...


2

You need to give your function "C" linkage to avoid name mangling. Declare it like this: extern "C" { int plop(); } and it will then properly be called "plop" rather than being name-mangled.


2

The problem is that your typemap has a name clash. The name of the variable passed to the function is buf and the name of the variable (pre-automatic rename) is buf also. SWIG is trying to be clever and use the contextually correct one, but that's not the behaviour you're hoping for. You can fix this in one of several ways: Rename one or both of the two ...


2

SWIG creates wrapper code to convert between C++ std::string and Python strings, if you include the typemaps defined in std_string.i.


1

Use the %nodefaultctor feature: %nodefaultctor std::type_index; // Disable default constructor generation for that class Since std::type_index does not define a default constructor, this should work. Looks like you have to put the statement before you define the class in the .i file so before the %include statement for type_index. Detals in section ...


1

I don't know SWIG well, so what I describe here is a general solution. If you really need default constructor, you have to create a wrapper class such as, class TypeIndex { // C++11 public: TypeIndex() { } TypeIndex(...): m(new std::type_index(...)) { } ~TypeIndex() { delete m; } TypeIndex(const TypeIndex &other) { if (other.m) ...


1

SWIG does not yet support extracting class/method/function documentation from comments in C++ header files. The closest you can get is the %feature("autodoc", level) and %feature("docstring") as explained in section 36.10 Docstring Features of SWIG docs. It looks as though some work on extending SWIG to recognize Doxygen tags to generate javadoc and python ...


1

We'll I've got it working by linking in an extra library. It seems libsundials_nvecserial.so and brethren don't contain the symbol N_VLinearSum. The SUNDIALS make process places functions and symbols from sundials_nvector.h into different .so files, somewhat counter intuitively. For now, I got this working with $ gcc -shared -L/usr/local/lib ...


1

Firstly it's worth noting that this problem is harder than simply making a "virtual" member variable using %extend that automatically calls an extra function when someone modifies it. This is because you want the fact that it's a member of another class to alter the behaviour. I can see several fundamental approaches you could take to get this behaviour: ...


1

SWIG does not convert arrays to Python lists automatically. Since you are using C++, use std::string and std::vector for your f, then SWIG will make all the necessary conversions automatically (don't forget to include "std_vector.i" and such, see the SWIG docs): void f(std::vector<std::string> > strs) If you cannot modify the declaration of f, ...


1

It turns out you just need to modify the last line above to read SWIG_LINK_LIBRARIES(example mylibrary ${PYTHON_LIBRARIES}) where mylibrary is understood at the libmylibrary.a file.


1

That looks sensible as written however I wouldn't recommend using it. As it stands you will lose the semantics of return by const reference if you force every case of it to become a copy. This will impact the SWIG wrapping of other things too (e.g. standard library containers). It has the potential to adversely impact performance of your wrapped code ...


1

I don't know if it matters, can't test, but Your .i might have to export the pack function after the array_functions: %module packer_cs %include <carrays.i> %{ #include "packer.h" %} %array_functions(image_t, image_t_array); %include "packer.h" Also, nothing forces you to declare the exact same signature. You can probably have something like ...


1

Yes, the python port (BTW there is 2.7 as well as 3.3) in naclports supports C extensions. There are several in naclports already (see ports/python_modules). I don't know if any of them use swig by I don't think that would be a problem.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible