New answers tagged

-1

When using the %c format specifier, you need to give an additional parameter specifying the number of characters to read. From the MSDN page for scanf_s: Unlike scanf and wscanf, scanf_s and wscanf_s require the buffer size to be specified for all input parameters of type c, C, s, S, or string control sets that are enclosed in []. The buffer size in ...


0

I opted to use scanf instead of scanf_s, also I prefer using enums and integers in switch statements. The following edit of your code worked for me; #include<stdio.h> int main() { int yos; double salary; char time; printf("Please enter your employee status, 'F' for Fulltime and 'P' for Parttime: \n"); scanf("%c", &time); ...


-1

scanf_s is Microsoft-specific are you use that you must use it? If I try with scanf and the gcc compiler then the first version of program seems to work and the default statement is not printed when the program is run. #include<stdio.h> int main() { int yos; double salary; char time; printf("Please enter your employee status, 'F' for ...


-1

In your second example, remove char inside if statements, so your code should look like this: #include<stdio.h> int main() { int yos; double salary; char time; printf("Please enter your employee status, 'P' for Fulltime and 'P' for Parttime: \n"); scanf("%c", &time); printf("Please enter your year of service: \n"); ...


0

proper initialization is mandatory. Suggest: high should be initialized to INT_MIN. low should be initialized to INT_MAX. Note: Those macros are found in stdint.h. then after the two lines: if (num > high) high = num; insert the two lines: if(num < low) low = num;


0

You are currently not updating the choice variable for each iteration, but rather only using the initial value. Furthermore, you're iterating until scan DOES NOT have an int, i.e. !scan.hasNextInt() and I guess you're intention is actually the opposite. public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception { //scanner for input Scanner scan = new ...


0

Try this: public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception { //scanner for input Scanner scan = new Scanner(System.in); //input variable String in; //loops until input is an integer ranging from 1 to 5 while (scan.hasNextLine()) { //checks if there is a new line of input in = scan.nextLine().trim(); //scans that line ...


0

Questions about the performance outcome of a particular style of code are almost always a waste of time. Here's how gcc5.3 deals with this code after an optimisation pass: test(char): cmpb $59, %dil je .L3 jle .L6 cmpb $77, %dil je .L3 cmpb $84, %dil je .L3 ...


0

There is no guarantee for the order of checking in a switch case. There is also no guarantee for the order of execution of || if there are no side effects for the expressions. Basically, if the only difference is timing, c++ guarantees nothing about the order of stuff, on the basis of the as-if rule.


0

I wrote a small program to test the thesis. #include <time.h> #include <ctime> #include <iostream> int main() { char currentChar = 'G'; int i = 0; clock_t current = clock(); while (i < 9999999999999999999) { if(currentChar== 'G' || currentChar == 'T' || currentChar == 'M' |...


0

switch (currentChar) { case 'G': case 'T': case 'M': case ';': case '\r': case '\n': doSomething(); break; } This makes doSomething() be called if currentChar is G, T, M, ;, \r or \n. It's faster to use a switch than just plain if, because switch ...


0

What would be faster to execute: the switch-case, or an if with || operator? You should worry about code readability and supportability, so use whatever is more readable for you. Then if you have issue with program speed work on optimization. For readability - of course that's subjective, but with switch you get less verbose code, as you do not have to ...


1

Once currentCharis compared to 'G', instructions jump to instruction doSomething(). You cannot rely on order of your cases to "optimize" the switch. Note that comparison is not necessary sequential. switch may be implemented as jump table for example: void foo_switch(char c) { switch (c) { case '0': bar0(); break; case '1': bar1(...


0

If the first condition is met (currentChar == 'G') are the following cases also evaluated, or the program jumps straight to doSomething()? It falls through until it finds a break or hits the end.


0

If the first condition is met (currentChar == 'G') are the following cases also evaluated, or the program jumps straight to doSomething()? In your example, it will straight away jump to doSomething(). In case you don't want to have this behavior, then you need to insert break statements as shown for one case below: switch (currentChar) { case 'G': /*...


1

What would be faster to execute: the switch-case, or an if with || operator? Go for switch(). If you have an enum or integer with small value set, switch() will usually create a jump table.


3

If the first condition is met (currentChar == 'G') are the following cases also evaluated, or the program jumps straight to doSomething()? It will immediately jump to execute doSomething() What would be faster to execute: the switch-case, or an if with || operator? I don't think it would make any difference with any decent modern c++ compiler, and ...


0

Yes. your code will work fine.Type uint can be assigned to with HEX values. If you try to print the value of "foo" or "a" after the code has been executed, you can see that they have integer values corresponding to the HEX values you have assigned them. And HEX values can be used in switch case statements in place of integer values. Both will work perfectly ...


2

Of course you can. "Hex Values" is merely a notation for an integral type, which is a valid case label in a C# switch block. Excepting the follow-through nature of a switch block - which you are obviating with break statements - the order of the case labels does not matter.


2

You can just use: if (num < low) { low = num; } The only problem is the first number. Since you initialize low to 0, any positive number the user enters will not be lower than this. You need to treat the first number specially. You can check the value of j for this. Then in your A case, test this variable. case 'A': printf("Enter an Integer\n"...


0

In an effort to avoid unnecessary confusion, I'm going to suggest an alternative. Instead of checking if something has already been clicked or not to determine the next color, you could instead try focusing only on 3 simple rules based on the current color and the desired logic you've described: If a cube is clicked for the first time (e.g. If it's not ...


0

You can also do something like: switch true { case myString.rangeOfString("lol") != nil: print("lol"); case myString.rangeOfString("dw") != nil: print("dw"); default: print("Default") }


4

You could do something like this: Firstly, encapsulate the font size settings in a class: public sealed class FontSize { public int Sup; public int Small; public int Normal; public int Title; } Now you can initialise a static FontSize and a static Dictionary<DeviceFamily, FontSize> somewhere in your class as follows: static ...


0

Interesting I think what matters most is this. Given a boolean value, a device family your dispalyed text should have a given font as set out above. However they aren't proportional to one another. So this switch case is the best way to do it other than some fourier series approximation which would give you the right fonts as a function of the two variables ...


1

In your code, fragments "Z".charcodeAt, "z".charcodeAt(0) and "9".charcodeAt(0) consist of charcodeAt function call. The thing is that JavaScript is case sesitive langauge. So, charcodeAt doesn't exists rather then charCodeAt.


0

Your code is also smelly because it seems you plan to expand this switch statement. To my understanding, running long switch or if/else blocks is inefficient and hard to read. Honestly you'd be better off using a std::map for smaller things or unordered map for larger things. Or you could use a class (imo, even better, because it follows OO) void ...


5

There are multiple problems with this approach: You cannot change the value of a parameter passed so that the value is changed for the calling code (in Java, except for a holder kind type like AtomicReference etc). Trying to make code generic because of possible reuse is not always a good idea, this tends to create complex generic code instead of readable ...


0

How About this? NOTE: I don't know that much Java, only Swift 2 var someIntegerValue = 1 func someSwitch(){ switch (someIntegerValue) { case 1: break; case 2: DoSomethingForBothCases(); break; case 3: DoSomethingUnrelated(); break; } } where you have a two button actions, some action button NEXT someIntegerValue +=...


0

Actually this is strange. Could You check if the Form is open and somehow has lost Focus? You can do that putting the following snippet after this statement: fuser.ShowDialog(); Code to check if Form is still open: if (Application.OpenForms[fuser.Name] == null) { MessageBox.Show("Form is not open"); } Hope this may help.


0

Regarding the "uninitialized variables": The simplest fix is to initialize the variables to some value of your choice, e.g.: double price1 = 0.0; double price2 = 0.0; Though your code compiles just fine on my machine (java 1.8.0_91). But be careful how the values are initialized/changed during program flow. E.g. and invalid input in one of the two switch-...


-1

Try a more object-oriented approach. You are learning OOP, aren't you? :) Create a class for a Product item. The class will have a Description field (string) and a Price field. Create a list to represent the customer's order, and Add all of the items (basic computer, monitor, any options) that the customer selects to the list. Each line item would be one ...


0

While this is not required by the standard, switch is usually translated to an array of function pointers, switch parameter being the key. Had the function been inlined, you needed a separate copy of this array in each place because function pointers might differ. This is very inefficient (both regarding memory and speed, due to how cache works), this a ...


4

It is actually quite easy :) case .Move(.Up): print("up") case .Move(.Right(let distance)): print("right by", distance) Your code case .Move(let direction) where direction == .Right: does not compile because == is defined by default only for enumerations without associated values.


7

There is no way for your switch statement as is to know the options in advance, partly because you are using hard-coded constants to compare the input with. Consider using an enum instead (the standard way of having limited, "hard-coded" options), and using the switch with your enum. When comparing with a String such as the user input, you can invoke ...


0

You can use "+" instead of "|" : function Check(var1, var2) { switch (var1 + var2) { case ('Contact' + var2): alert('1'); break; case ('Company' + var2): alert('2'); break; default: alert('0'); } }


0

It will always match the first case since 'any string string' | true === 1 results always 1. Bitwise operators treated both value as string so parsing string result NaNor 0 and true result 1. The result would be calculates as NaN | 1, which results 1.(If the value is NaN or Infinity, it's converted to 0) Refer : Bitwise operations on non numbers So that ...


1

Will need more inputs to answer your question. (Maybe your code snippet will help understand things better) Are you using inline keyword explicitly for the function containing switch case in your code?! Well if you have (I presume you have) then, just wanted to say that, Compiler can ignore the request for treating the function as inline. There are few ...


0

I noticed that rather than executing this.Close() to close login form on every role, keep that login form hidden behind after successful login: if (result.Rows.Count == 1) { this.Hide(); string role = result.Rows[0]["Role"].ToString(); switch (role) { case "User": FrmUser fuser = new FrmUser();...


0

You don't need semicolon, because the $_GET['id'] is a variable, not a string. Read this http://www.w3schools.com/php/php_switch.asp


0

You do not need a semicolon after the closing bracket of a switch statement (same as an if statement).


0

Like what been said in the comments, avoid using Labels and/or goto rep. Use something like that : import java.util.Scanner; public class AtmMachine { public static void main(String[] args){ int actualPin = -1; int sel = 0, pin, pin2, check, ctr = 0, dep, with, bal = 10000; Scanner sc = new Scanner(System.in); while(actualPin == -1) {...


1

If I understand your problem correctly you will want to have something like that: while (pin == pin2) { System.out.println("What would you like to do?"); System.out.println("1 - Check Balance"); System.out.println("2 - Deposite"); System.out.println("3 - Withdraw"); System.out.println("4 - Change Pin"); System....


12

Yes, this is valid, because in this case, the , is a comma operator. Quoting C11, chapter §6.5.17, Comma operator, (emphasis mine) The left operand of a comma operator is evaluated as a void expression; there is a sequence point between its evaluation and that of the right operand. Then the right operand is evaluated; the result has its type and ...


1

You need to enclose the switch in a while-loop and set "location" to whatever you want next. if(CurrentPosition.Value != 0){ while (location > -1) { switch(location) { case 0: if(criteria1 && criteria2) { LimitLongsPT.Send(S1 + ((R1 -...


2

You are missing a return as stated in the answer by Alexander T, but I would also recommend adding a key to each of your elements. React depends on this value for it's diff'ing algorithm, you could do something like: render: function(){ var elements = myPackage.map(function(myObj, pIndex){ return myObj.sectionInfo.map(function(myObj1, sIndex){ ...


2

You should return value from first .map, in your case it is result from inner .map var elements = myPackage.map(function(myObj){ return myObj.sectionInfo.map(function(myObj1) { // ... }); }); Update: Based on your new update, you can change your code like this var App = React.createClass({ section: function(myObj, parentIndex) { ...


0

I fully agree with what Jägermeister said. I think you should use proper OO principles to improve your code, but if you really wanted a switch... You should convert the expressions you have into single values. You could use an enum like: public enum Result { A, B, C, D, E, F } Of course you should give it meaningful names! Then you can have a method ...


3

You might step back for a second and read about the TDA principle. What you are doing here in essence is: query the state of something, and then make decisions on how something else should be reacting to that. Thing is - that is really not object-oriented thinking. You could instead go for: interface CommandManagerUpdater { void updateOnNewDirection(...


3

You can't. The labels in a switch must be compile time evaluable constant expressions, and must compare exactly with the thing being switched on.


0

Simply set the selection variable to meet the condition that you already have to exit the loop: case '5': cout << "Goodbye.\n"; selection = 0; break;



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