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I think I may have found a way to do this using collect – it works in R2016a: syms T fi t real fun = symfun(sin(T+fi)+cos(T+fi),[T fi]); fun = expand(fun); fun2 = collect(fun,[cos(fi) sin(fi)]) which returns (cos(T) + sin(T))*cos(fi) + (cos(T) - sin(T))*sin(fi). This usage of collect (collecting functions of a variable) isn't really documented. I tried ...


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Short Answer I recommend applying the sqrt function after defining a symbolic 3: rt3 = sqrt(sym(3)); While sym(sqrt(3)) may work just as well, I like defining simple numbers as symbolic prior to applying functions on them. More below Long Answer By default, sym attempts to find a rational equivalent to a numeric literal passed to them. However, due ...


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One approach is to try various combinations of simplification functions/methods such as rewrite and simplify. For example, the following gives the result you want: import sympy as sp x = sp.var('x', real = True) f = sp.tan(x/2) sp.re(f.rewrite(sp.exp).simplify().rewrite(sp.sin)).simplify() sin(x)/(cos(x) + 1)


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As you've noticed, taking the derivative of an abstract symfun like x(t) is not the same as taking the derivative of a symbolic variable like x (assuming x(t) hasn't already been declared in the scope) – see my answer here for more. One needs to be very careful substituting like you're doing. The problem arrises because x(t) gets substituted for 'x' inside ...


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You can evaluate functions efficiently by using matlabFunction. syms s t x =[ 2 - 5*t - 2*s, 9*s + 12*t - 5, 7*s + 2*t - 1]; x=matlabFunction(x); then you can type x in the command window and make sure that the following appears: x x = @(s,t)[s.*-2.0-t.*5.0+2.0,s.*9.0+t.*1.2e1-5.0,s.*7.0+t.*2.0-1.0] you can see that your function is now ...



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