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2

You can use the mechanics module, which was designed around Newtonian physics. In particular, dynamicssymbols will give you a symbol which implicitly depends on t. In [10]: x, y = dynamicsymbols('x y') In [11]: x Out[11]: x(t) By default, these will still print with the (t), but if you enable the mechanics printers, they will not. In [1]: from ...


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trigsimp, as Aristocrates points out, does the reverse, because sin(x) + sin(y) is simpler than 2*sin((x + y)/2)*cos((x - y)/2). trigsimp internally uses an algorithm based on a paper by Fu, et. al., which does pattern matching on various trigonometric identities. If you look at the source code, all the identities are written out in individual functions ...


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In an ipython notebook you can enable Sympy's graphical math typesetting with the init_printing function: import sympy sympy.init_printing(use_latex='mathjax') After that, sympy will intercept the output of each cell and format it using math fonts and symbols. Try: sympy.sqrt(8) See also: Printing section in the Sympy Tutorial.


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It seems that SymPy is missing a very important thing here, which is that your outer sum is just between x1 = 1 and x1 = 2. Performing that simplification makes the summations simple enough that SymPy can do them In [75]: e = 120*factorial(2*x1)*factorial(2*x2)*factorial(2*x3)*factorial(-2*x1 - 2*x2 - 2*x3 + ...


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The simplest way to do it is this: sympy.pprint(sympy.sqrt(8)) For me (using rxvt-unicode and ipython) it gives ___ 2⋅╲╱ 2


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You most probably want to perform common subexpression elimination. In your example siny is the only expression actually being reused: >>> expr = pi*sin(pi*x)*sin(pi*y) + sin(pi*y)*sin(pi*z) >>> print(cse(expr)) ([(x0, sin(pi*y))], [pi*x0*sin(pi*x) + x0*sin(pi*z)]) Usually compilers should already do these transformations - at least if ...


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This question had a simple answer after all. Sympy's Lambda does the trick in this case and then I can re-apply L after evaluation is done.


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In the end, the workaround i used was abs(x-1): x= symbols('x') XL = (1-x)**2 XH = abs(x-1)**1.5 XX= Piecewise((XL,x<=1),(XH,x>1)) plot(XX,(x,0,2),adaptive=False, num_of_points=200) it's correct for when the number will actually be used, and avoids the error. I submitted the bug as well on Github.


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I believe it depends on the precision of the underlying Float object. SymPy uses mpmath to provide arbitrary precision floating point numbers. The default precision is 15 digits, but you can set any precision. It looks like it uses scientific notation when it can't represent the whole number using the given precision. You can force a given precision to be ...


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Did you perhaps inadvertently overwrite p_1? p_1, p_2 = symbols("p_1 p_2") p_1 = L.diff(phi_1.diff(t)) You created a symbol but then destroyed it by creating a Python variable with the same name, so when you try to differentiate wrt p_1 you are (as Aaron pointed out) differentiating wrt an expression, not a symbol that you created.


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It's essentially the same problem. The second argument to diff (or the only argument if called as a method) should be a single Symbol, not an expression. In this case, your differentiation "variable" is an entire expression, which doesn't even make sense mathematically.


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The natu package handles units of temperature. For instance, you can do this: >>> from natu.units import K, degC, degF >>> T = 25*degC >>> T/K 298.1500 >>> T/degF 77.0000 >>> print(0*degC + 100*K) 100.0 degC Prefixes are supported too: >>> from natu.units import mdegC >>> 100*mdegC/K 273.2500 ...


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Use the mathematical expression: f^(n)(x) / n! x^n: diff(f(x), *[x for _ in xrange(n)]) / factorial(n) * x**n The * magic is just unpacking the list: diff(f(x), *[x, x, x]) is equivalent to: diff(f(x), x, x, x)


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I take it from your question that you are using Normal from sympy.statistics. You should move to sympy.stats. sympy.statistics has been deprecated for some time, and will be removed in the next version of SymPy. To answer your question more directly, you can replace functions with functions using replace, like expr.replace(erf, lambda x: (N(x) - 0.5)/0.5). ...


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An easy way to do this is to add O(x**n) to the expression, like In [23]: x + x**2 + x**4 + x**10 + O(x**3) Out[23]: 2 ⎛ 3⎞ x + x + O⎝x ⎠ If you want to later remove it, use the removeO method In [24]: (x + x**2 + x**4 + x**10 + O(x**3)).removeO() Out[24]: 2 x + x You can also use series to take the series expansion of the expression. The ...


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You can combine equalities and inequalities using boolean operators And, Or, and Not (you can also use the &, |, and ~ operators, respectively). I would create a boolean expression representing the constraint you wish to satisfy, in this case, And(-5 < i, i < 5), and substitute the solution in it at the end. Something like In [10]: expr = Eq(i, ...


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If you would describe what you wish to do I could show you how to do it using my new fork of sympy (https://github.com/brombo/sympy) using galgebra. I can be contacted at abrombo@verizon.net.


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1. Solution: Your problem is, that the function T expects a value, but you are handing out a list. Try this instead of print T(data[0],[0.29,4.5])to get a list of results: print [T(val,[0.29,4.5]) for val in data[0]] Or use a wrapper function: def arrayT(array, params): return [T(val, params) for val in array] print arrayT(data[0], [0.29, 4.5]) ...


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If you take a look at the polynomial module docs: http://docs.sympy.org/latest/modules/polys/reference.html there will be plenty of ways to go about it, depending on the specifics of your situation. A couple different ways that would work: Using .coeffs(): >>> f = 3 * x**3 + 2 * x**2 + x * y + y**3 + 1 >>> order = 2 >>> coeffs ...


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It's not that the docs aren't up-to-date, but that the docs you are looking at are too new. The versions you linked are the git development version of the docs, the sympy.physics.vector docs for version 0.7.5 are here: http://docs.sympy.org/latest/modules/physics/vector/index.html and you'll see they don't include the "Docstrings for basic field ...


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What you are doing is correct. In [14]: from sympy import * In [15]: a = 2*Symbol('x') In [16]: isinstance(a, Mul) Out[16]: True In [17]: a = 2 + Symbol('x') In [18]: isinstance(a, Add) Out[18]: True


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The documentation is here, but I can't pretend that it looks particularly easy to follow. It looks as though the documentation is incomplete (and version 7.0 was different), so you may have to cast around for a while or ask the sympy people directly.


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The issue is with your init_printing statement. In a notebook, you do not want to run latex, instead you should use mathjax, so try this instead: init_printing(use_latex='mathjax') When I use this, I get normal pretty printing everywhere, even when I have a sympy expression as the last line of the cell.


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There's no builtin way to do this, but you could probably modify the a subclass of the printer pretty easily, and pass it in as a custom printer to init_printing(pretty_printer=Printer). You want to subclass PrettyPrinter and override _print_Function to be the same, except changing the call that uses prettyForm.FUNC. If you want to add an option to do this ...


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This is not specific to Sympy - other programs like Maple or Mathematica suffer from same the problem: When solving an equation, solve needs to choose a proper solution strategy (see e.g. Sympy's Solvers) based on assumptions about the variables and the structure of the equation. These are choices are normally heuristic and often incorrect (hence no ...



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