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3

getcwd only allocates enough memory to hold the directory when you pass NULL. Concatenating to its result has undefined behaviour. If you want to use strcat, you need to provide your own buffer with enough space: char buffer[MAXPATHLEN] = {0}; if (getcwd(buffer, sizeof(buffer))) { strcat(buffer, "/"); strcat(buffer, argv[1]); deleteDir(buffer); ...


3

The getcwd function is probably allocating just enough space to hold the current path, so adding more characters with strcat overflows the buffer, and results in undefined behavior. Try this char path[MAXPATHLEN]; getcwd( path, MAXPATHLEN ); strcat( path, "/" ); strcat( path, argv[1] );


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They don't. AVR has no provision for software interrupts. If you need to generate an interrupt from software then you will need to convince some piece of hardware to generate it instead. Otherwise just use a JSR as normal.


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The O_NONBLOCK flag is primarily meaningful for file descriptors representing streams (e.g, pipes, sockets, and character devices), where it prevents read and write operations from blocking when there is no data waiting to read, or buffers are too full to write anything more at the moment. It has no effect on file descriptors opened to regular files; disk ...


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man 2 open explains why: int open(const char *pathname, int flags); int open(const char *pathname, int flags, mode_t mode); O_CREAT: If the file does not exist it will be created. [...] The permissions of the created file are (mode & ~umask). So if you want a file that's not executable, you can use: ...


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You might find the source code of mount.ecryptfs_private.c useful, as it builds the mount string, and then performs the mount. This is the setuid binary used by pam_ecryptfs in Ubuntu to mount a user's encrypted home directory. https://bazaar.launchpad.net/~ecryptfs/ecryptfs/trunk/view/head:/src/utils/mount.ecryptfs_private.c Full disclosure: I am the ...


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STDIN_FILENO is a constant defined in unistd.h: The following symbolic constants are defined for file streams: STDIN_FILENO File number of stdin. It is 0. STDOUT_FILENO File number of stdout. It is 1. STDERR_FILENO File number of stderr. It is 2. As it is a constant, you can't reassign them.


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The normal userspace order as per the x86-64 ABI is: rdi, rsi, rdx, rcx, r8, then r9. That is not much more logical, beats me how they have come up with that. Since the syscall instruction clobbers rcx, that had to be substituted and r10 has been chosen for that. This is at least somewhat logical :)



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