Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

8

Because on many 64 bits machines (e.g. x86-64) for the common GCC compiler sizeof(int)==4 but sizeof(void*)==8 && sizeof(long)==8; This is called the I32LP64 (or just LP64) data model For instance, compile and run the following program on a Linux/x86-64 system: #include<stdio.h> #include<stdint.h> int main () { printf ...


6

GetWindowText got the window name without performing a context switch. Which seems to imply that the text for every window that exists is accessible without a context switch. This info is stored in memory that is shared between all the processes that use user32.dll. You may try to search virtual space of your process for unicode names of other ...


5

this line you are missing an = if(pipe(pfd2) =-1){


4

You could try mmaping the file at the desired offset and mapping in exactly the required size, and then simply calling memset. EDIT: Based on the code posted by @jthill, here is a simple example which demonstrates how to do a comparison.. #define _GNU_SOURCE #include <unistd.h> #include <sys/stat.h> #include <sys/mman.h> #include ...


4

According to this Wikibooks page, it depends on which instruction you are using to perform the syscall. If you are using int $0x80, then you should use eax for the syscall number, and ebx, ecx, edx, esi, edi, and ebp for the parameters (in that order). If you are using the syscall instruction, you should use rax for the syscall number and rdi, rsi, rdx, ...


4

This bug 33661, which is rather old. I encountered it myself several years ago.


4

The purpose of the 2nd buffer is to amortize the system call overhead. If you read/write only a few bytes at a time, this second user space buffer will improve performance enormously. OTOH if you read/write a large chunk, the 2nd buffer can be bypassed, so you don't pay the price for double copying.


4

sizeof("digraph g {\n") includes null terminator, so the strings are written into the file with the '\0' character. Your file viewer shows zeros using the ^@ digraph. You should not be using sizeof at all - instead, use strlen. Better yet, use appropriate I/O functions to write strings into files without requiring you to supply their length in a separate ...


4

You could use something like this skipping the cgo all together, I can't test it right now: const ( netNS = "/run/netns/" mntNS = "/run/mntns/" ) func ChangeNamespace(name string) error { fd, err := syscall.Open(netNS+name, syscall.O_RDONLY, 0666) if err != nil { return err } defer syscall.Close(fd) if _, _, err := ...


3

System calls man pages are located in the section 2 of the man pages, see intro(2). Library functions man pages are located in the section 3 of the man pages, see intro(3). There are many of them (and most of them use some syscalls, but some don't need any syscalls e.g. round(3)). And some useful Glibc specific functions don't have man pages, for example ...


3

A syscall is, from the application code perspective, an elementary atomic operation (it is a "virtual machine instruction"). See also syscalls(2). The ABI specifies how exactly it is happenning. For x86-64 you can find it here. See also x86 calling conventions. For some syscalls, recent kernels provide the vdso(7) to make them faster. The Linux kernel ...


3

exec* calls usually do not return. If they return then only because exec failed to load the new process image. In that case the error is returned in errno. If you are interested in the exit status of your child process then you have to either install a signal handler for SIGCHLD or wait for your child in the parent and retrieve the exit status that way. ...


3

wait() returns the pid of the child process (or -1 on error). Since you're not clearing the AH register before the next syscall, chances are part of that value is still there, and you end up invoking an arbitrary system call instead of 0x0a. Try setting EAX instead of AL: mov ebx, esp mov eax, 0x0a int 0x80


3

MAP_FIXED specifies that the mmap'd memory should be at the virtual address passed as the first argument to mmap(). This has very limited usage in modern user programs and in fact some operating systems simply return an error if MAP_FIXED is specified. One possible use for MAP_FIXED is when implementing a memory allocator (such as malloc()), mmap() may be ...


3

The files in /proc are not ordinary files. For most of them, stat() et al. return .st_size == 0. In particular, /proc/PID/exe is not really a symlink or a hardlink, but a special pseudofile, which behaves mostly like a symlink. (If you need to, you can detect procfs files checking the .st_dev field. Compare to .st_dev obtained from ...


3

I would avoid using this code. As written, it's wrong: on 32-bit systems and maybe even some 64-bit ones, SYS_getdents is the legacy syscall that doesn't provide d_type and lacks support for 64-bit inode numbers, which means you get gratuitous errors on modern filesystems. Even if you fix it, it's no better than inlining readdir, which does basically exactly ...


3

Your stdin is your terminal (/dev/tty) and you typed abcdG<NL>. Your read(0,...,3) call requested only 3 characters (abc) from the terminal device driver's buffer. The remaining characters remained in the buffer. When you then returned control to vim, it proceeded to read from stdin and get the remaining, buffered characters.


2

You forgot to int 0x80 a second time to actually print the number. When you div ebx, what is calculated is eax = edx:eax / ebx, so you have to make sure that edx is zero in your case. So xor edx,edx before you div ebx. You should pad the front of your buffer with spaces, otherwise you might run into trouble depending on where stdout goes in the end. I am ...


2

If you are running Linux and the filesystem supports sparse files, you could try to punch a hole in your file using fallocate(2) with the FALLOC_FL_PUNCH_HOLE flag. I would expect that to be fast, although I didn't test it.


2

Yes, it would appear that syscall 0 is merely a mnemonic for li $v0,0; syscall. As for what is syscall 0, that's completely dependent on the platform the MIPS chip is running inside of. For example, I used to work on PlayStation1 games (yeah, back in the day.. sigh..), and I think syscall was used to execute math calculations on the specialized vector unit. ...


2

To make a system call in 64-bit Linux, place the system call number in rax, then its arguments, in order, in rdi, rsi, rdx, r10, r8, and r9, then invoke syscall. Here is an example .global _start .text _start: # write(1, message, 13) mov $1, %rax # system call 1 is write mov $1, %rdi ...


2

The man-pages that should come with Linux also can be found at man7.org. It provides various indexes ("long lists") on the man-pages. The current POSIX man-page index is here: http://pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/9699919799/nfindex.html


2

Both wikipedia and cppreference are good for this, as well as the documentation for the the libc you have (likely glibc). For example: http://en.cppreference.com/w/c/string/byte


2

First off, you're making a syscall on Mac OS X with an assumption that it will behave just like the Linux kernel, which is clearly wrong (Linux fork syscall convention != XNU fork syscall convention). Mac OS X does not support users directly making system calls without going through the libSystem library. Now leaving that aside, I'm not sure which version ...


2

First you need to be able to command your toolchain (gcc?) to not to include anything extra other than your code. Something like -nostartfiles -nodefaultlibs to gcc should work. Then you need to be nice working with Linux, meaning your elf need to be loaded properly by the os, meaning it needs to have _start point visible. Below would be such an example: ...


2

Obviously you write a 64-bit program and you use the "int 0x80" instruction. "int 0x80" however only works correctly in 32-bit programs. The address of the stack is in a range that cannot be accessed by 32-bit programs. Therefore it is quite probable that "int 0x80"-style system calls do not allow accessing this memory area. To solve this problem there are ...


2

This sequence provides a thread-safe way to close a socket. dup2 allows to close a socket without releasing a file descriptor. This can be a lengthy operation due to untransmitted data and a long linger interval. dup2(A, B) is an atomic equivalent to close(B); fcntl(A, F_DUPFD, B); i.e. B remains a valid descriptor at any time. Keeping the file ...


2

(There is an issue filed on the Go project) So, the answer to this question is that you have to call setns from a single-threaded context. This makes sense since setns should join the current thread to the namespace. Since Go is multi-threaded, you need to make the setns call before the Go runtime threads start. I think this is because the thread in which ...


1

They are NETLINK messages, as you can see if you monitor the telnet command from userspace with strace (check the socket family): sendto(3, "\24\0\0\0\26\0\1\3?\254\364R\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0", 20, 0, {sa_family=AF_NETLINK, pid=0, groups=00000000}, 12) = 20 sendto(3, "\24\0\0\0\26\0\1\3?\254\364R\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0", 20, 0, {sa_family=AF_NETLINK, pid=0, ...


1

Syscall params are first passed from userspace via registers to system_call() function which is in essence a common syscall dispatcher. However system_call() then calls real system call functions such as sys_read() in a usual manner, passing parameters via stack. Therefore, messing up with the stack leads to crash. Also, see this SO answer: ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible