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8

That's quiet easy - the person can use doorbell to let kernel know its waiting outside. And this doorbell in our case is usually a special CPU exception, software interrupt or dedicated instruction that userspace is allowed to use and kernel can handle. So the procedure is like this: First you need to know system call number. Each syscall has it's unique ...


7

wait4 is a C identifier. Remember that identifiers can contain digits (like 4 in wait4), so standard function names can contain digits. Notice that wait4(2) is documented as obsolete and you should use waitpid(2) I don't exactly know the history of wait4; IIRC it was in SunOS3.5 in 1988. I imagine that the 4 could indeed refer to the arity of the function, ...


4

poll_wait adds your device (represented by the "struct file") to the list of those that can wake the process up. The idea is that the process can use poll (or select or epoll etc) to add a bunch of file descriptors to the list on which it wishes to wait. The poll entry for each driver gets called. Each one adds itself (via poll_wait) to the waiter list. ...


3

In case of wait4(), the 4 is part of the function name, it's not a parameter. Sample: func1(), func2() etc. Regarding why it is named: These function, named like ...2(), ...3() are small variants of the same function, with some specific behaviour and /or some improvement over their predecessor, like for example. wait3() waits of any child wait4() can be ...


3

GDB has a "break on syscall" feature. See https://sourceware.org/gdb/onlinedocs/gdb/Set-Catchpoints.html So the strategy, if you're new to debugging tools, is to set the catchpoint and step over the line calling the function ("next" in gdb). If it breaks before it reaches the line after the function call, then a system call occurred (or the program crashed, ...


2

Strictly speaking, your statement Therefore I think POSIX defines the system calls of Unix (and of Linux) is slightly incorrect. System calls as such are not part of POSIX. This standard defines a programming interface, i.e. functions that are required to be implemented as specified for a system to be compliant but it says nothing about whether they need to ...


2

Yes, but not directly on the file size as I know. Take a look at: https://lwn.net/Articles/604686/ This will give you a good startpoint how to interact with file notifications. After a file change your handler can be notified. In the handler you can check for size and do your job. Excerpt: There is dnotify which basically works with the syscall fcntl(fd, ...


2

As far as I know, there is no way (from a user-mode process) to "disable" SYSENTER, so that executing it will generate an exception. (I'm assuming your programs don't try to SYSEXIT, because only Ring 0 can do that). The only I option I think you have is to do like VirtualBox does, and scan for invalid instructions, replacing them with illegal opcodes or ...


2

According to the document here, "wait4 is the fourth version of wait (after wait, waitpid, and wait3), which subsumes all the functionality of the others".


2

Short version: poll() doesn't work on normal files. (Or rather, it works but doesn't do anything useful.) Longer version: the POLLIN event simply means that, if you call read() on the file descriptor, it will not block. However, this is always true for normal files: if you are at the end of the file, then read() will return 0 immediately. You are seeing the ...


2

Linux system calls are listed in syscalls(2). Most are POSIX, but some are specific to Linux (e.g. signalfd(2), etc...). Some functions are standardized in POSIX but implemented in Linux library code, e.g. dlopen(3) (see POSIX dlopen) built above mmap(2)...


2

Two things here: First, fork() return 0 in child process while it returns a non zero pid to the parent process. Second, short circuit of &&. So in the beginning of the first process (p0), it runs to i < 5 && !fork(). Now i = 0 and another process created (p1). Now for p0, test !fork() fails, it ends the for loop and waiting for child ...


1

clone(2) and inotify(7): clone is system call, inotify is group of calls, an API. These are not listed as POSIX, and are not part of a POSIX specification. This is true for many flavors on UNIX/Linux. Linux is generally not considered POSIX, there are ways to write code and to use the POSIXLY_CORRECT environment variable to (usually) get what you need ...


1

There are relatively few calls defined by POSIX that are not part of Linux, or other Unix systems. They tend to be newer function calls that have simply not been implemented yet. For example, the various *at() functions may not be implemented everywhere yet, so fchmodat() is not as widely portable as fchmod() or chmod(). There are many calls that are part ...


1

A system call is supposed to be used by an application program to avail a service from kernel. You can implement a system call in your kernel module, but that should be called from an application program. If you just want to expose the statistics of your new scheduler to the userspace for debugging, you can use interfaces like proc, sys, debugfs etc. And ...


1

Here read_size = recv(new_socket, pBuf, buffersize, 0); recv() tells you how much bytess it received for the current iteration, namly read_size bytes. And here write_size = fwrite(pBuf, 1, buffersize, text); you ignore the number of bytes received, but always write buffersize. Fix this by writing to the target file the actual received amount of data: ...


1

Many processors have an instruction to call a specific "trap" or "interrupt", the Linux kernel sets up such a "trap" or "interrupt" specifically for systems calls. The library sets up processor registers in a certain way, and then then performs the special trap or interrupt instruction, which causes the processor to enter privileged mode and call the ...


1

I believe it simply can be found by parsing argv[0] from int main(int argc, char *argv[]). If it contains /, it is called from its path, otherwise it is called from command-line.


1

Here is access functions: #define F_OK 0 /* test for existence of file */ #define X_OK 0x01 /* test for execute or search permission */ #define W_OK 0x02 /* test for write permission */ #define R_OK 0x04 /* test for read permission */ Care, this is Hex-code, but hex work too. Return values for most system calls it ...


1

According to the "official" spec, http://pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/9699919799//functions/rmdir.html , no. It clearly says "The directory shall be removed only if it is an empty directory., and further If the directory is not an empty directory, rmdir() shall fail and set errno to [EEXIST] or [ENOTEMPTY].. Anyway, I suspect such a filesystem ...


1

You can go with d = `date` e = IO.popen("date").read Take some time also with IO.popen, IO.popen2, IO.popen3.


1

I'm not sure if debugger is the best tool you can use for tracing live system calls. As you've mentioned LiveKd session is quite limited and you are not allowed to place breakpoints in it (otherwise you would hang your own system). However, you still can create memory dumps using the .dump command (check windbg help: .hh .dump). Keep in mind though that ...


1

You can do this portably with the standard streams from <stdio.h>: #include <stdio.h> #include <ctype.h> /* uppercase letter at offset 1024 */ FILE *fp = fopen("filename", "r+b"); if (fp) { fseek(fp, 1024L, SEEK_SET); int c = getc(fp); if (c != EOF) { fseek(fp, 1024L, SEEK_SET); putc(toupper((unsigned char)c), ...


1

What do you mean 'the job of the kernel'? Consider a malicious piece of code trying to break the kernel, passing an address of something in the kernel. If the kernel did not have proper mechanisms it would corrupt its own state. Moreover, the address could be plain invalid. In short, of course the kernel has to check it. In linux they do access_ok() for ...



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