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474

Find JDK Installation Directory First you need to know the installation path for the Java Development Kit. Open the default installation path for the JDK: C:\Program Files\Java There should be a subdirectory like: C:\Program Files\Java\jdk1.6.0_10 Note: one has only to put the path to the jdk without /bin in the end (as suggested on alot of ...


106

What worked for me was adding the %JAVA_HOME%\bin to the Path environment variable with the JAVA_HOME environment variable pointing to the jdk folder.


105

There are mainly three types of variables in MySQL: User-defined variables (prefixed with @): You can access any user-defined variable without declaring it or initializing it. If you refer to a variable that has not been initialized, it has a value of NULL and a type of string. SELECT @var_any_var_name You can initialized a variable using SET or ...


92

You have to first Install JDK in your system. Set Java Home JAVA_HOME = C:\Program Files\Java\jdk1.7.0 [Location of your JDK Installation Directory] Once you have the JDK installation path: Right-click the My Computer icon on Select Properties. Click the Advanced system setting tab on left side of your screen Aadvance Popup is open. Click on ...


20

To piggy-back on @Endoro's answer (I lack the rep to comment): If you want to change the system-wide environment variables, you have to use /M, a la: setx PATH "%PATH%;C:\Program Files\MySQL\MySQL Server 5.5\bin" /M setx.exe is picky about placement of the /M, BTW. It needs to be at the end.


13

http://javahowto.blogspot.com/2006/05/javahome-vs-javahome.html Control Panel > Java, Java tab, click the View button. In Runtime Parameters, put: -Djava.home=YOUR_PATH_HERE Or when you execute Java you can add that command line switch to the command: java -Djava.home=PATH SomeJavaApp


12

When I remember right, then there is a difference between: You can access the system properties in different ways: #{systemProperties['databaseName']} #{systemProperties.databaseName} ${databaseName} //$ instead of # !! With #{systemProperties['databaseName']} you have access to system-system-properties. With #{systemProperties.databaseName} you ...


12

You need to set it to C:\Sun\SDK\jdk (Assuming that is where the JDK is installed - It is not the default) - Do not put the \bin in C:\Sun\SDK\jdk\bin. If your app only runs when you are logged in as the current user then put it in the user variables - If it needs to run for all users on your system then put it in System variables. You might also need to ...


10

You could use setx for that purpose Like so: setx /M JAVA_HOME "C:\Program Files (x86)\Java\jdk1.6.0_17"


8

Use getenv to get environment variables, including HOME. If you don't know for sure if they might be present, you'll have to parse the string looking for them. You could also use the system shell and echo to let the shell do this for you. Getenv is portable (from standard C), but using the shell to do this portably will be harder between *nix and Windows. ...


8

JavaScript has global variables and in browsers, global variables are properties of the global object which is window. Now, window itself has a couple of predefined properties and some of them are read-only, like window.status [MDN] (this can also differ from browser to browser!). Creating a global variable with such a name will therefore fail (the variable ...


7

This is the official solution for setting the Java environment from www.java.com - here. There are solutions for Windows 7, Windows Vista, Windows XP, Linux/Solaris and other shells. Example Windows 7 Select Computer from the Start menu Choose System Properties from the context menu Click Advanced system settings -> ...


7

Use System.Environment.ExpandEnvironmentVariables like so: String concretePath = Environment.ExpandEnvironmentVariables(@"%TEMP%\myapplication\data");


6

Seems you have dowloaded the maven source code. Download from here. Make sure you are downloading (Binary zip)


6

This limitation is based on older Windows restrictions, where length of environmental variables was important. This limitation is still there in the Oracle installation. Work around this: Step 1: Copy the value of your 'path' variable to a text-editor (Ex.: notepad) and save this value as backup. Step 2: Reduce the size of this path to less that 1023 ...


5

Environment.ExpandEnvironmentVariables


5

In Eclipse: Window->Preferences->Java->Installed JREs Use the search feature to make sure your latest Java installation is listed; then make sure it is the one that is checked. This should be a JDK not a JRE.


5

While adding your Java directory to your PATH variable, you might want to put it right at the beginning of it. I've had the problem, that putting the Java directory at the end of the PATH would not work. After checking, I've found java.exe in my Windows\System32 directory and it looks like the first one wins, when there are several files with the same name ...


5

you shouldn't look at the system environment variables but to your user environment variables:


5

I solved it just now. Even though the end destination is the same, typing var into the search bar opens the environment variable window, but prevents editing. However, if you right click Computer, select properties, select advanced settings, then click on environment variables, even though you're in the same location, the variables are then editable.


4

One way to do this kind of thing is to use a PropertyPlaceholderConfigurer which can be configured to use the system properties. I also noticed that the Spring 3.1 M1 blog entry talks about new stuff for accessing configuration information from "the environment". Of course, that is only a milestone ... not a production-ready release.


4

For those who are still stumped with this problem (I tried all the above suggestions) -- If you're on a 64-bit version of Windows and you've installed the 32-bit JDK, besides adjusting PATH variables, you may need to adjust registry variables, too. I was pulling my hair out, having correctly set my PATH variables -- still to no avail -- and then only ...


4

SETX /M Path "%PATH%;%ProgramFiles%\MySQL\MySQL Server 5.5\bin\ It will append your path to system variable


4

You can set an environment variable using os.environ as you mentioned simply with: os.environ['SYS_VAR'] = <the path you want as a string> or, in your case os.environ['SYS_VAR'] = 'C:/suspicious_folder' To have your environment variable, SYS_VAR, persist across sessions and be added permanently, you may want to check out: Is it possible to set an ...


4

My freshly installed Windows 8.1 has PATH=C:\WINDOWS\system32;C:\WINDOWS;C:\WINDOWS\System32\Wbem;C:\WINDOWS\System32\WindowsPowerShell\v1.0\;


3

MSBuild does expand environment variables. $(OGRE_HOME) should work just fine. The only problem is that Visual Studio caches the values of these environment variables heavily, so changes that you make will not be immediately reflected. There are two general ways to change the values of environment variables, and both of these go wrong with VS: Changing ...


3

Run Eclipse as Administrator. That solved my problem. I'm still digging for the logic behind it.


3

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1980105/how-to-get-localappdata-in-visual-studio-c


3

You're assumptions are correct, this is not currently allowed, nor do I think it ever will be. I believe their reasoning for this is so developers cannot access personal information like phone numbers and addresses and exploit them. You can send mail and SMS messages from with the app, and you can see the current call state.


3

I am running MSBuild 4.0 and in my proj file ToolsVersion is set to 4.0. The variable SDK40ToolsPath points to where the .NET 4.0 tools are installed. SDK35ToolsPath points to where the .NET 3.5 tools are installed. MSBuild reads these variables, base on the value of ToolsVersion, from the registry at: ...



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