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53

There are many similar questions here on SO: Logging best practices log4net versus TraceSource Silverlight Logging framework and/or best practices log4net vs. Nlog What's the point of a logging facade? C# Logging. What should I use? You missed several commonly used logging frameworks. Here is a list of commonly used frameworks, some of which you ...


42

All the members in the Debug class are marked with ConditionalAttribute, so the call sites won't be compiled into a Release build.


37

What you need to do is capture the Standard Output stream: p.StartInfo.RedirectStandardOutput = true; p.StartInfo.UseShellExecute = false; // instead of p.WaitForExit(), do string q = ""; while ( ! p.HasExited ) { q += p.StandardOutput.ReadToEnd(); } You may also need to do something similar with StandardError. You can then do what you wish with q. ...


35

That's not your concern... It's the job of the operating system to distribute processor time between running processes. If you'd like to give other processes first crack at getting their stuff done, then simply reduce the priority of your own process by modifying the Process.PriorityClass value for it. See also: Windows Equivalent of ‘nice’


32

howto net os version VB: Public Function GetOSVersion() As String Select Case Environment.OSVersion.Platform Case PlatformID.Win32S Return "Win 3.1" Case PlatformID.Win32Windows Select Case Environment.OSVersion.Version.Minor Case 0 Return "Win95" Case 10 ...


32

Under the hood, pretty much all Stopwatch does is wrap QueryPerformanceCounter. As I understand it, Stopwatch is there to provide access to the high-resolution timer - if you need this resolution in production code I don't see anything wrong with using it.


20

For per process data: Process p = /*get the desired process here*/; PerformanceCounter ramCounter = new PerformanceCounter("Process", "Working Set", p.ProcessName); PerformanceCounter cpuCounter = new PerformanceCounter("Process", "% Processor Time", p.ProcessName); while (true) { Thread.Sleep(500); double ram = ramCounter.NextValue(); double ...


19

Elapsed.TotalMilliseconds (double) returns the total number of whole and fractional milliseconds elapsed since inception e.g. a stopwatch stopped at 1.23456 seconds would return 1234.56 in this property. See TimeSpan.TotalMilliseconds on MSDN Elapsed.Milliseconds (int) returns the number of whole milliseconds in the current second e.g. a stopwatch ...


17

If the process has a windows interface (as you refer to the red "X"), you can try Process.CloseMainWindow(). If it fails, you can fallback to Process.Kill().


16

I think TraceSource is the newer version (since .NET 2) and Trace is the older version, more info is available here: Clarification on TraceSource/Trace


16

You can find plenty of information about log4net and NLog either here on StackOverflow on by more generally googling. You can also find a lot of info about System.Diagnostics. One thing to note about System.Diagnostics, I think that you will find a lot of references here on StackOverflow about using Debug.Write/WriteLine and Trace.Write/WriteLine. An ...


15

Yes, System.Diagnostics does sound like it is for debugging only, but don't let the name deceive you. The System.Diagnostics namespace may seem a bit scary sounding for use in production code at first (it did for me), but there are plenty of useful things in that namespace. Some things, such as the Process class, are useful for interacting with the system. ...


14

Can can use PsExec from http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/bb897553.aspx Or WMI: object theProcessToRun() = { "YourFileHere" }; ManagementClass theClass = new ManagementClass(@"\\server\root\cimv2:Win32_Process"); theClass.InvokeMethod("Create", theProcessToRun);


13

The answer to this is that e.Data will be set to null: static void proc_ErrorDataReceived(object sender, DataReceivedEventArgs e) { if( e.Data == null ) _exited.Set(); }


12

You have to redirect your Input, Error, and Output. for example: ProcessStartInfo info = new ProcessStartInfo("cmd.exe"); info.UseShellExecute = false; info.RedirectStandardInput = true; info.RedirectStandardError = true; info.RedirectStandardOutput = true; info.UserName = dialog.User; using (Process install = Process.Start(info)) { string ...


12

The key is that you don't want to kill your process by Id. In fact, that's a race condition: your spawned process could die and another process could get created with the same Id. Then when you go to kill it, you would end up killing the new process instead of the old one that was already dead. The most reliable way to kill spawned processes is to put them ...


12

Because you're running in a 32-bit process, you're getting redirected to the 32-bit version in SysWoW64 Run %WINDIR%\SysNative\dism.exe to prevent redirection.


10

Since the Debug methods all have the [Conditional("DEBUG")] attribute on them, if you switch from Debug to Release you will have not have to worry about it as the calls to those methods will be removed (along with the other optimizations of a Release build).


10

You can use WMI to get the friendly product name ("Microsoft® Windows Server® 2008 Enterprise "): using System.Management; var name = (from x in new ManagementObjectSearcher("SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem").Get().OfType<ManagementObject>() select x.GetPropertyValue("Caption")).First(); return name != null ? name.ToString() ...


9

System.Diagnostics.Debug method calls are only present when the "DEBUG" conditional compilation symbol is defined. By default, the "DEBUG" symbol is defined only for debug builds. Compilers that support ConditionalAttribute ignore calls to these methods unless "DEBUG" is defined as a conditional compilation symbol.


9

You should plan on raising ETW trace events throughout your app - not only to alert listeners to issues, but also to provide visibility into the behavior and even performance of your apps' and components' performance. ETW is an (insanely) high performance and (astonishingly) low-impact way of raising events that can be gathered and analyzed - even in ...


9

This is way late, but have you considered using TraceSource? TraceSources give you actual object instances that you can use to log to System.Diagnostics (which means that you could extend them with an extension method as you propose in your question). TraceSources are typically configured in app.config (similar to how you would configure log4net loggers). ...


9

Reading the documentation, it sounds like Launch does nothing if the debugger is attached - it doesn't actually break (although I haven't verified this). Break asks to launch the debugger (if not attached), and does do the break. In reality, it is unlikely you'd have more than one Launch point... if that.


8

Depending on what the 3rd party process is doing exactly you could try polling its threads' states: foreach(ProcessThread thread in process.Threads) if (thread.ThreadState == ThreadState.Wait && thread.WaitReason == ThreadWaitReason.UserRequest) process.Kill(); Failing that... you can try to process.StandardInput.Close(); ...


8

I honestly think rather than worry about trying to limit CPU utilization by your app, you should focus more of your energies on profiling the application to uncover and correct bottlenecks and inefficiencies that may exist.


8

You can use the Debugger.IsAttached flag to determine this.


8

There can be a significant impact in performance if tracing is left on using the default trace listener. If you want production ready performance tracing, I would strongly recommend using the EventSource class from .NET 4.5 instead of the tracing method. This works with PerfView by creating an ETW event source, and has almost no impact on runtimes, even ...


8

Lucas' answer has a race condition: If the process finishes quickly the while loop may never be entered. In that case the output is never read even if there is data in it. I have tried the following and it just works fine: using (var process = Process.Start(startInfo)) { process.WaitForExit(); var output = process.StandardOutput.ReadToEnd(); ...


7

Use the System.ServiceProcess.ServiceController class for a service. You can use Status to check if it's running and the Stop() and Start() to control it. ServiceController sc = new ServiceController(); sc.MachineName = remoteSystem; sc.ServiceName = procSearc; if (sc.Status.Equals(ServiceControllerStatus.Running)) { sc.Stop(); } else { sc.Start(); } ...


7

Use one of the following: WMI (see aloneguid's answer) Task Scheduler API (http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/aa383606%28v=vs.85%29.aspx) PsExec WshRemote object with a dummy script. Chances are, it works via DCOM, activating some of scripting objects remotely. Or if you feel like it, inject your own service or COM component. That ...



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