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1

oPSI.WindowStyle = System.Diagnostics.ProcessWindowStyle.Maximized Remove this line


-1

I you launch you application from a terminal does i work? if yes you can use System.Console.Write() to do it like in the terminal but from your programm. I think you can tell the terminal to open it in minimize like so: System.Console.WriteLine("start /min apli.exe") Good luck!


3

Try to launch any commands like that : ProcessStartInfo procStartInfo = new System.Diagnostics.ProcessStartInfo("cmd", "/c " + "notepad.exe"); you can replace notepad.exe by any command.


2

try this: System.Diagnostics.Process process = new System.Diagnostics.Process(); System.Diagnostics.ProcessStartInfo startInfo = new System.Diagnostics.ProcessStartInfo(); startInfo.WindowStyle = System.Diagnostics.ProcessWindowStyle.Hidden; startInfo.FileName = "cmd.exe"; startInfo.Arguments = "/C notepad.exe"; process.StartInfo = startInfo; ...


0

I'm not sure why you hold private List<int> pids = new List<int>(); instead of usage just the list of Process directly private List<Process> processes = new List<Process>(); It's important to understand that the Process object have security descriptor. Everybody can see the existence of the process, someone can open the process ...


0

The problem is that you are trying to kill a process that had finished it's job. You keep the process ids of some processes but if any of them had finished it's execution there is no longer a process with that process id. So when you trying to get a process that is not alive you face an exception. Process.GetProcessById(i); //this will throw exception if ...


1

I don't know why you are declared pids as List<int> and cleared the list (pids.Clear();) on button click event. Anyway the below will work for creating multiple processes also. EDIT: As so far discussed with Amrit. The Windows 8 creating sub processes for mstsc with connecting same domain. So I slightly modified my code. private void ...


0

Run your tool itself as admin, now all opened cmd.exe instances are runing as admin. To do this, add this entry to your application manifest: <security> <requestedPrivileges xmlns="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:asm.v3"> <requestedExecutionLevel level="requireAdministrator" uiAccess="false" /> </requestedPrivileges> ...


0

In your arguments specify the user as Adminstrator info.Arguments = "/user:Administrator \"cmd /K " + string.Format(@"/C ""C:\Program Files\MCSI\Responder\ddna.exe"" analyze -q -c {0} {1}", rootFile[j], rootFile[j]) + "\"";


0

I know this is old, but System.Diagnostics.Trace is pretty easy to configure if you keep it simple. I've been using the simple text writer config block for years, copied right out of the MSDN docs. No one mentions this very often, but in your code, you can use the built-in Trace.TraceInformation, Trace.TraceWarning, and Trace.TraceError to easily ...


1

try something like this: process.StartInfo.UseShellExecute = false; process.StartInfo.RedirectStandardOutput = true; process.OutputDataReceived += new DataReceivedEventHandler((sender, e) => { if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(e.Data)) { result+=e.Data; } }); process.Start(); // Asynchronously ...


0

My problem was that the TRACE constant was not defined in a dependent project, so even though it was set in the main project, it still wouldn't log. Once I added the TRACE constant to the dependent project, it worked as expected.



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