Hot answers tagged

66

Try this: System.Reflection.MethodBase.GetCurrentMethod().Name


51

Does this clear it up? // path1 and path2 point to different copies of the same assembly on disk: Assembly assembly1 = Assembly.LoadFrom(path1); Assembly assembly2 = Assembly.LoadFrom(path2); // These both point to the assembly from path1, so this is true Console.WriteLine(assembly1.CodeBase == assembly2.CodeBase); assembly1 = Assembly.LoadFile(path1); ...


36

From Suzanne Cook's blog: LoadFile vs. LoadFrom Be careful - these aren't the same thing. LoadFrom() goes through Fusion and can be redirected to another assembly at a different path but with that same identity if one is already loaded in the LoadFrom context. LoadFile() doesn't bind through Fusion at all - the loader just goes ...


29

For static values you can pass null for the instance parameter. var type = typeof(SomeClass); var field = type.GetField("SomeField"); field.SetValue(null, 42);


23

Use Attribute.IsDefined: PropertyInfo[] fields = myClass.GetType().GetProperties() .Where(x => Attribute.IsDefined(x, typeof(TestAttribute), false)) .ToArray();


22

The CLI spec (ECMA 335) Partition II, Clause 21 states in part: While any user-defined type can be used as an attribute, CLS compliance requires that attributes will be instances of types whose base class is System.Attribute. In other words, a language that is not CLS-compliant may allow you to specify attributes that do not derive from Attribute, ...


21

Having the class name in string is not enough to be able to create its instance. As a matter of fact you will need full namespace including class name to create an object. Assuming you have the following: string className = "MyClass"; string namespaceName = "MyNamespace.MyInternalNamespace"; Than you you can create an instance of that class, the object ...


19

I guess you should be able to do it like this: using System.Diagnostics; using System.Linq; ... StackFrame[] frames = new StackTrace().GetFrames(); string initialAssembly = (from f in frames select f.GetMethod().ReflectedType.AssemblyQualifiedName ).Distinct().Last(); This will get you the Assembly ...


19

You want this: cl.GetMethods(BindingFlags.DeclaredOnly | BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.Public); Per the MSDN documentation it states that DeclaredOnly: Specifies that only members declared at the level of the supplied type's hierarchy should be considered. Inherited members are not considered. Now, maybe you explicitly want methods ...


18

C# compiler converts overloaded operator to functions with name op_XXXX where XXXX is the opration: operator== -> op_Equality operator!= -> op_Inequality operator+ -> op_Addition operator- -> op_Subtraction operator< -> op_LessThan operator> -> op_GreaterThan operator<= -> op_LessThanOrEqual operator>= -> op_GreaterThanOrEqual ...


17

After a lot of head-scratching I've discovered a difference myself this afternoon. I wanted to load a DLL at runtime, and the DLL lived in another directory. That DLL had its own dependencies (DLLs) which also lived in that same directory. LoadFile(): Loaded the specific DLL, but not the dependencies. So when the first call was made from within the DLL ...


14

You can't get method parameter values from reflection. You'd have to use the debugging/profiling API. You can get the parameter names and types, but not the parameters themselves. Sorry...


14

Boxes aren't immutable as far as the CLR is concerned. Indeed, in C++/CLI I believe there's a way of mutating them directly. However, in C# the unboxing operation always takes a copy - it's the C# language which prevents you from mutating the box, not the CLR. The IL unbox instruction merely provides a typed pointer into the box. From section 4.32 of ...


13

Type.GetProperty Situations in which AmbiguousMatchException occurs ... ...derived type declares a property that hides an inherited property with the same name, by using the new modifier If you run the following var properties = myDE.GetType().GetProperties().Where(p => p.Name == "MyEntity"); you will see that two PropertyInfo objects are ...


13

The best I could think of so far is the following, which should work in a single-threaded scenario: // using System.Diagnostics; // using System.Linq; Assembly entryAssembly = new StackTrace().GetFrames().Last().GetMethod().Module.Assembly; (The above snippet is optimized for ease of understanding, not for execution speed or memory efficiency.)


13

When you get the property infos with BindingFlags.NonPublic, you find the getter or setter by using GetGetMethod(true) and GetSetMethod(true), respectively. You can then check the following properties (of the method info) to get the exact access level: propertyInfo.GetGetMethod(true).IsPrivate means private propertyInfo.GetGetMethod(true).IsFamily means ...


12

This is expected especially in the Windows Services where they are loaded by an unmanaged runtime. Use: Process.GetCurrentProcess().MainModule.FileName To get unmanaged entry point file. Update It seems you are looking for this: System.Reflection.Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().GetName().Name


12

I take it they're each inherited from something else and that's why you need multiple inheritance? Make an interface (IAircraft) and have them both implement it. interface IAircraft { /* Common methods here */ } class _E190 : TheParentClass, IAircraft { /* Your code */ } class _E195 : TheOtherParentClass, IAircraft { /* Your code */ } /* ... ...


12

Basically: the language specification. But actually, Type.FullName uses the BCL definitions, not the C# definitions - and interestingly they disagree. For example: namespace X { public class Y { public class Z {} } } To C#, Z is X.Y.Z; to the BCL it is X.Y+Z. The representation of generics changes too - with the BCL using back-ticks and ...


11

Test against MethodInfo.GetBaseDefinition(). If the function is an override, it will return a different method in a base class. If it's not, the same method object will be returned. When overridden in a derived class, returns the MethodInfo object for the method on the direct or indirect base class in which the method represented by this instance was ...


11

var parameter = Expression.Parameter(entityType, "entity"); var property = Expression.Property(parameter, propertyInfo); var funcType = typeof(Func<,>).MakeGenericType(entityType, propertyInfo.PropertyType); var lambda = Expression.Lambda(funcType, property, parameter); structureConfiguration.GetType() .GetMethod("Ignore") ...


11

there are four different kinds of exception handler blocks: catch clauses: "Catch all objects of the specified type." filter clauses: "Enter handler only if filter succeeds." finally clauses: "Handle all exceptions and normal exit." fault clauses: "Handle all exceptions but not normal exit." Given these brief explanations (cited from ...


11

public static string Version { get { var assembly = typeof(MyType).GetTypeInfo().Assembly; // In some PCL profiles the above line is: var assembly = typeof(MyType).Assembly; var assemblyName = new AssemblyName(assembly.FullName); return assemblyName.Version.Major + "." + ...


10

You can check the stack trace using System.Diagnostics; // get call stack StackTrace stackTrace = new StackTrace(); // get calling method name Console.WriteLine(stackTrace.GetFrame(0).GetMethod().Name); But beware, if the method is inlined you get the parent method name.


10

1. If catch { … } really is a catch clause, then how are fault clauses different from catch clauses? The C# compiler (at least the one that ships with .NET) actually appears to compile catch { … } as if it were really catch (object) { … }. This can be shown with the code below. // using System; // using System.Linq; // using System.Reflection; static ...


10

If you've already got a dictionary, I'd avoid reflection and just use DynamicObject For example: public class DynamicDictionary : DynamicObject { private readonly Dictionary<string, object> dictionary; public DynamicDictionary(Dictionary<string, object> dictionary) { this.dictionary = dictionary; } public override ...


9

You can use Type.GetType(string) in order to do this. The type name must be assembly qualified but the method will load the assembly as necessary. The assembly qualification is not necessary if the type is in mscorlid or the assembly which executes the GetType call.


9

Look at your Slice class: public sealed class Slice { public readonly double firstName; public readonly double secondName; public readonly double thirdName; ... } Those aren't properties. They're fields. Either make them properties, or use Type.GetField() instead. Using properties would generally be a better idea, IMO, and needn't be ...


8

Type.GetConstructor. Note this returns a ConstructorInfo rather than a MethodInfo, but they both derive from MethodBase so have mostly the same members.


8

fields.Where(pi => pi.GetCustomAttributes(typeof(TestAttribute), false).Length > 0) See documentation for GetCustomAttributes().



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible