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4

As its javadoc tells you, the @ListenerFor is intented to be put on an UIComponent or Renderer implementation, not on a standalone SystemEventListener implementation. For the latter, you'd need to register it as <system-event-listener> in faces-config.xml. E.g. <application> <system-event-listener> ...


4

Capture the UI thread SynchronizationContext in a static field, and Post() on it to go back to the UI thread.


4

Can you simply work out the number of seconds until midnight, and then sleep for that long?


4

public void Main() { var T = new System.Timers.Timer(); T.Elapsed += CallBackFunction; var D = (DateTime.Today.AddDays(1).Date - DateTime.Now); T.Interval = D.TotalMilliseconds; T.Start(); } private void CallBackFunction(object sender, System.Timers.ElapsedEventArgs e) { (sender as System.Timers.Timer).Interval = ...


3

See SetWindowHooksEx. Good article, "Windows Hooks in the .NET Framework": http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/cc188966.aspx


3

While testing your program I got the following error CallbackOnCollectedDelegate was detected Message: A callback was made on a garbage collected delegate of type 'Sandbox Form!Sandbox_Form.Program+HookProc::Invoke'. This may cause application crashes, corruption and data loss. When passing delegates to unmanaged code, they must be kept alive ...


3

Turns out there was an uncaught exception in one of my handlers. Apparently, this stopped subsequent events from firing.


2

Some messages that might interest you would be provided to [NSWorkspace notificationCenter], such as when apps launch, come to the front, or quit. I'm not sure what you mean by "window switches". If you mean changing which window is in front without changing which app is in front, that's generally considered "none of your business" on the Mac.


2

Do you really need to use SystemEvent? How about other methods for IPC IpcChannel is an alternative technique that seems to fit your requirements.


2

@mcgrailm's answer shows you how to obtain all active (read: not disabled) network services, whether currently bound to addresses or not. This answer, by contrast, shows you how to determine the network service to whose interface the current (primary) IPv4 address is bound: Unfortunately, this is non-trivial, as the information must be drawn from several ...


1

All you have to do is create an event tap and set the mask. Sample: @interface AppDelegate () @property (assign) CFMachPortRef myEventTap; @property (assign) CFRunLoopSourceRef myRunLoopSource; @end @implementation AppDelegate CGEventRef MyEventTapCallBack(CGEventTapProxy proxy, CGEventType type, CGEventRef event, void *refcon) { ...


1

You can receive a NOTIFICATION_EVENT_TIME_CHANGE notification if you P/Invoke CeRunAppAtEvent - see http://bytes.com/topic/net/answers/652128-how-detect-system-time-change-compactframework. Hans Passant's comment (listening for a WM_TIMECHANGE event) could be an even more straightforward approach, although this also requires some P/Invoking in the compact ...


1

You just need to include it in your query :) tell application "System Events" tell current location of network preferences set names to get name of every service whose active is true end tell end tell


1

No, not directly. I see two ways to achieve this : By Implementing an interface in front of the systemEvent By using a detouring framework such as Moles Framework or the Microsoft Fakes


1

I guess your exception message is self explanatory. global system event notifications are not supported here. I don't know why you want to do this in IIS. But as you want to so, i would suggest you to write a windows service and communicate with it using something like Named Pipes, MSMQ etc to get such events.


1

The Short Reliable Answer: On any recent Windows version, you can try to cancel shutdown but Windows may decide to ignore you; this is sadly by design. If you absolutely have to finish operations before your process is terminated, the right place to do this is in the SessionEnded handler. If you have tasks that must complete before your process terminates, ...


1

You can probably do this by listening to dbus events. Start experimenting by using dbus-monitor from the command line. Example from my laptop (Ubuntu) when I disconnect eth0: $ dbus-monitor --system ... ... # lots of events scroll by, including the ones below ... signal sender=:1.6 -> dest=(null destination) serial=1275 ...


1

well, I got an answer on the Titanium Q&A. apparently there is a close event that will fire everytime the window is closed.


1

The underlying plumbing for SystemEvents are Windows messages that are broadcast to all top level windows. Messages like WM_SETTINGCHANGED. You too can broadcast messages, pinvoke SendMessageTimeout with HWND_BROADCAST. This is somewhat risky, you'll be sending messages to programs that have never seen the message number before. At the very least you'll ...


1

I don't think there is an easy .Net built in way to do this. The only way I know of is to use PostMessage or SendMessage to the Windows Event Queue. You can read the details About Messages and Message Queues. There are TONS of resources for invoking these native commands on google, but one of the best to start with is pinvoke.net.


1

If you need to be alerted when that event is fired throughout the lifetime of your application instance then no, you don't need to unregister it. If you have objects that go out of scope which subscribe to that event then they should unregister as the event object holds a reference to the subscriber, preventing it from being GC'd.


1

Are you only subscribing once, at the start of your program, and you would only unsubscribe when your process is terminating? If so, don't bother. When your process has terminated, if there are any "system level" hooks around it's the operating system's duty to clean those up for you - you don't need to worry about it. It's not like the operating system is ...


1

Speaking authoritatively only about the iOS packager (and by extension assuming it should be true of the apk packager) I know that recent AIR versions do indeed let you pause when the OS interrupts your application. NativeApplication.nativeApplication.addEventListener(Event.ACTIVATE, onNativeAppActivated); ...


1

How about using the Group Policy? You can launch a process on the logoff event, if you use the group policy of the local machine.


1

Try looking into monitoring WMI events, you should be able to create a Wql event query that monitors the day of week change (i.e. ManagementEventWatcher etc) and then setup an event handler that fires when the event arrives. using System; using System.Management; class Program { public static void Main() { WqlEventQuery q = new ...


1

Having never used it, this is my guess. Imagine you have a hundred databases, and you want to log every time people log into each one, you could do it on each individual server, but that would make answering questions like "Which databases did 'Mark' Login to" difficult". So, instead, you have each database register its "user logon" events with OID (via ...



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