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22

More than that :) it stops your security issues before they become one. It is not a security silver bullet of course... we used to use it (a few years back when I was involved in Perl projects) in any script that was exposed externally (i.e. any mod_perl app) and we found it very useful and made it our policy. It does a few checks and it is handy.. ...


14

Most definitely! $ echo '`rm -rf /`' | perl -Te 'eval while <>' Insecure dependency in eval while running with -T switch at -e line 1, <> line 1.


12

Erm... this is actually well documented, I suppose: When the taint mode (-T ) is in effect, the "." directory is removed from @INC , and the environment variables PERL5LIB and PERLLIB are ignored by Perl. You can still adjust @INC from outside the program by using the -I command line option as explained in perlrun. ... but that's only a half on ...


11

You can pass the PERL5OPT environment variable on the shebang line: #!/usr/bin/env PERL5OPT=-T perl This seems all rather backwards to me. Another option, is to re-execute the script under taint mode if you detect it's not on: #!/usr/bin/env perl warn 'Taint mode is '.(${^TAINT} ? 'on' : 'off'); # For debugging exec($^X,'-T',$0,@ARGV) unless ...


10

The "Secure Programming Techniques" chapter of Mastering Perl is almost completely devoted to taint checking and how you should use it. Many people will tell you it protects you, but they subtly lie about that. It's a developer tool that helps you find some (only some) spots in your code where you need to be careful. It's not going to solve all of your ...


10

What is Tainted? User input is tainted, by definition. For example: string = gets string.tainted? # => true You can also manually taint an object. string = 'Not yet tainted.' string.tainted? # => false (string = 'Explicitly taint me!').taint string.tainted? # => true Why Untaint an Object? Generally, you would untaint an object only after ...


8

The #! is commonly called a "shebang" and it tells the computer how to run a script. You'll also see lots of shell-scripts with #!/bin/sh or #!/bin/bash. So, /usr/bin/perl is your Perl interpreter and it is run and given the file to execute. The rest of the line are options for Perl. The "-T" is tainting (it means input is marked as "not trusted" until you ...


8

The whole point of tainting is to ensure that unchecked input cannot be supplied to potentially unsafe functions. In this case, your $searchterm variable might contain unexpected input that might allow an attacker to execute arbitrary programs on your system. Hence, you either need to: untaint the variable by ensuring that it matches a pre-determined ...


7

Your question is not really related to taint mode. You set $ENV{PATH}="/usr/bin:/bin:/sbin:/usr/sbin"; These directories do not normally exist on a Windows machine. dir is a cmd.exe internal command so to be able to execute that, you need to add the directory where it resides to the path. Now, note that the way you go about doing it contradicts the ...


6

I think taint mode would work best when new code is being developed that everyone is familiar with. If you have someone else's code that is poorly written, and you run it in Taint mode -- perl will die rather than perform what by the tainting rules are 'unsafe' operations. In taint mode perl some holes are patched but not all. ...


6

You talk about untainting the file path every time. That's probably because you aren't compartmentalizing your program steps. In general, I break up these sort of programs into stages. One of the earlier stages is data validation. Before I let the program continue, I validate all the data that I can. If any of it doesn't fit what I expect, I don't let the ...


6

Edit: Using $ in the pattern (as I did before) is not advisable here because it can match \n at the end of the filename. Use \z instead because it unambiguously matches the end of the string. Be as specific as possible in what you are matching: my $fn = '/public_html/mystuff/10000001/001/10/01.cnt'; if ( $fn =~ m! ^( /public_html ...


5

Use the built-in grep function, e.g.: open my $fh, '<', $file or die $!; my @entries = grep /$searchterm/i, <$fh>;


5

Do you trust the internal users? If not, then yes.


4

User-Defined Character Properties in perlunicode package Characters::Sid_com; sub InBad { return <<"BAD"; 0000\t10FFFF BAD } sub InEvil { return <<"EVIL"; 0488 0489 EVIL } sub InStupid { return <<"STUPID"; E630\tE64F F8D0\tF8FF STUPID } ⋮ die 'No.' if $tring =~ / (?: \p{Characters::Sid_com::InBad} | ...


4

2nd Edition of Answer The perldoc perlsec manual describes taint mode (there is also perldoc Taint for a module related to Taint mode). In part, it illustrates: $path = $ENV{'PATH'}; # $path now tainted $ENV{'PATH'} = '/bin:/usr/bin'; delete @ENV{'IFS', 'CDPATH', 'ENV', 'BASH_ENV'}; $path = $ENV{'PATH'}; # $path now NOT tainted system "echo ...


4

Both -w and -T are sort of "foolproof" flags. -w is the same as use warning statement in your code, and it's an equivalent of warning option in many compilers. A simplest example would be a warning about using uninitialized variable: #!/usr/bin/perl -w print "$A\n"; print "Hello, world!\n"; Will print: Name "main::A" used only once: possible typo at ...


3

I think the problem here is that the backtick operator is effectively executing code outside of the perl environment, and is therefore quite rightly not trusted, ie. tainted. You could, of course, try doing something like this before the offending line: $ENV{"PATH"} = ""; You will probably still get an error from this line: my $file = "justafile.txt"; ...


3

The -T switch only warns you about possible tainted input: http://perldoc.perl.org/perlsec.html#Taint-mode You need to untaint it yourself, for example using my $safe_searchterm = ""; $safe_searchterm .= $_ for $searchterm =~ /\w+/g; That's not a very sophisticated test though, and possibly not too safe either, unless you have complete control over what ...


3

You are supposed to restrict the path, meaning: setting it to a small number of known values that fulfill certain requirements (such as $ENV{PATH} = '/sbin:/usr/sbin:/usr/bin';), not adding to it. See Cleaning Up Your Path in perlsec for the details. In your simple case, it is best to clear it altogether and rely only on system calls with fully qualified ...


3

Yes, you have an insecure dependency in system while running with the -T switch. :p You're running your script in taintperl mode, and calling an external program (with sudo, no less) with data based on information passed in from the user (which could be tainted). If you're really sure that output is valid and doesn't pose risk, you need to untaint it: see ...


3

You need to set your real userid to the effective (suid-ed) one. You probably want to do the same for your real group id: #! /usr/bin/perl -T use warnings; use strict; $ENV{PATH} = "/bin:/usr/bin"; system "id -un"; system "/bin/bash", "-c", "id -un"; # set real user and group ids $< = $>; $( = $); system "/bin/bash", "-c", "id -un"; Sample run: ...


3

I think "no" is an understatement for an answer, but there you have it. No, Unicode does not have a concept of "bad" or "good" characters (let alone "ugly" ones).


3

Carp::Always works fine with exceptions raised by taint checks. Example output: $ perl -MCarp::Always -T blah.pl Insecure dependency in sprintf while running with -T switch at blah.pl line 6 main::foo() called at blah.pl line 8 main::bar() called at blah.pl line 10


3

This is correct behaviour for taint mode. The documentation specifies: You may not use data derived from outside your program to affect something else outside your program--at least, not by accident. [...] $arg = shift; # $arg is tainted [...] If you try to do something insecure, you will get a fatal error saying something like ...


3

To untaint ie. variable $unsecure, a regular expression should be applied my ($secure) = $unsecure =~ / (\d+) /x or die q{we couldn't find number in $unsecure};


3

Why reinvent the wheel? Did you take a look at findbugs? If you know some bug pattern then write your own bug detector with findbugs and your are done. Here, here, here and here are some starting points...


3

Not a full solution (= nice existing way to do this), but some hints: Two papers about secure information flow in Haskell I know of are Li and Zdanevic, 2006 (one of the authors is also involved in Jif) and Russo et al., 2008. Both approach your "tainting" from the opposite side, namely, tagging values by how secure they are known to be, and use a lattice ...


3

A simple model of this might be as follows: {-# LANGUAGE EmptyDataDecls #-} {-# LANGUAGE GeneralizedNewtypeDeriving #-} {-# LANGUAGE TypeOperators #-} module Taint ( (:+), srand, BadRandom, Unbounded, Tainted (), (<+>)) where import Control.Applicative import Control.Monad.Identity data a :+ b data ...


2

I use Devel::SimpleTrace a lot these days for debugging and it recently helped me find a taint bug when using Archive::Zip. However, I don't know if it would have worked in your case since it is essentially setting the same sig handler that you used.



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