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24

You need to have a @require in the user script header to load jQuery. Something like: // @require http://code.jquery.com/jquery-latest.js


12

Chrome Fixed the security issues on version 36.0.1985.125 Chrome 36.0.1985.125 WEDNESDAY, JULY 16, 2014 Release note From my observation, this update fixed the issue on using window.close() to close the popup window. You will see this in the console when it fail, "Scripts may close only the windows that were opened by it.". That means The hacky workarounds ...


4

TamperMonkey does not appear to have such functionality, but an alternative would be to immediately call $.noConflict with the removeAll argument set to true. This will cause jQuery to reset the original $ and jQuery back to their original values. Example UserScript: // ==UserScript== // @name jQuery noConflict test // @namespace ...


3

Apart from avoiding version conflicts and breaking the content page, I do a handful of other things in my default userscript template that includes jQuery. The template below strives to meet the following goals in the interest of being a universal template for including jQuery in new scripts regardless of the content page's current or future status with ...


3

Since Chrome extensions don't really (explanation below) have access to the filesystem Tampermonkey stores the scripts at an internal storage. What you can do is to allow Tampermonkey to access your local files, copy the header of your script to Tampermonkey and additionally @require the full script that is located somewhere at your hard disk. "don't ...


3

This might be old, but let's answer it. I use top.close() to close a tab. window.close() or other open...close didn't work for me.


3

Send mouse events. Like so: //--- Get the first link that has "stackoverflow" in its URL. var targetNode = document.querySelector ("a[href*='stackoverflow']"); if (targetNode) { //--- Simulate a natural mouse-click sequence. triggerMouseEvent (targetNode, "mouseover"); triggerMouseEvent (targetNode, "mousedown"); triggerMouseEvent ...


3

The problem with userscripts and jQuery-UI is that jQUI uses CSS with lots of background images, all loaded with relative paths. EG: ... url("images/ui-bg_dots-small_35_35414f_2x2.png") ... For security reasons, that relative path will seldom work out for a userscript. This means that to use jQUI in a userscript you can either: Load the required CSS ...


2

This should do it for tampermonkey. Just need to update the namespace to the one you want it to run against. If the site already uses jQuery then you can ditch the require attribute as well. // ==UserScript== // @name Updator // @namespace http://stackoverflow.com/ // @version 0.1 // @description enter something useful // @match ...


2

You have two instances of action variable one global and one local clearInterval(action) // global var var action = setInterval(inc, 1000); // local var just declare it first, and don't use var when using it: var action; function timer(){ clickedyet=!clickedyet; if (clickedyet == false){ clearInterval(action); } ...


2

You're treating msgeven/msgodd as an array. But it's a NodeList! You can convert them with this: msgeven = Array.prototype.slice.call(document.getElementsByClassName("even unread")); msgodd = Array.prototype.slice.call(document.getElementsByClassName("odd unread"));


2

Firstly, you should include these two lines, so that you can use jQuery: // @require http://code.jquery.com/jquery-2.1.0.min.js // @run-at document-end And then all of this will work: $( "input[tpye='submit']" ).click(); $( "input[name='press']" ).click(); $( "input[value='submit']" ).click(); or alternatively: $('#form_id').submit();


2

The problem is that you are trying to access some nodes that still don't exist. Add this to your script: // @run-at document-end Then you make sure that all nodes are loaded and printed. Another bypass would be this: $(document).ready( //your script );


2

Location must be lower case. location.reload(); By the way, passing a true as a param means that the page will load from the server instead than loading from caché.


2

Tampermonkey is simply an extension that injects boilerplate scripts to evaluate your custom scripts, so you can debug any of these scripts if you can find them.. The trouble is that it is evaluating userscripts as if someone called eval() on them, so you will see VM### instead of something nice like myscript.js and you can't normally navigate to them like ...


2

You can change what page javascript sees2 by overriding an <input>'s value-property's getter. Note that this one override also changes what jQuery and other libraries see: Object.defineProperty (HTMLInputElement.prototype, "value", { get: function () { return "xxx"; //return this.value; //-- Warning! This causes infinite ...


2

this lost its scope, so when calling $(this) inside setTimeout this represents the anonymous function passed as the setTimeout callback. Save the scope before. $("input[type=checkbox]").each(function(){ var self = $(this); var inputValue = self.attr("value"); if(inputValue == val) { setTimeout(function() { ...


2

You can add type of control in the selector with id to get specific element you want. You can use attribute selector with type of element as under. In the attribute selector use the * as a wild card for elements containing the given string in the id. $("textarea[id*=rule_definition]").attr('rows','30'); If you are sure the id will start with ...


2

Crayon Violent details how to accomplish this in his answer to JavaScript detect an AJAX event. The trick is to hook the underlying XMLHttpRequest object in order to detect when a request is sent. I've re-written the logic there a bit to make it more suitable for your needs: // // Hooks XMLHttpRequest to log all AJAX requests. // Override ...


2

That's because you're calling alert on pageload, not on click, you probably wanted an anonymous function as well var testbutton = document.createElement("button"); testbutton.addEventListener('click', function() { alert("Working"); }, false); testbutton.id = "testbutton"; testbutton.innerHTML = "This is a button"; testElement.appendChild(testbutton); ...


1

Note: All id's must be unique and if not please do To change the textarea to 30 rows (assumed :one textarea) you can do like $('textarea').attr("rows","30") <script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.11.1/jquery.min.js"></script> <textarea id=thisspecificid rows=15></textarea>


1

This will find the textarea element in the #thisspecificid $('#thisspecificid textarea').attr('rows', 20); Demo: https://jsfiddle.net/tusharj/rwmwyhd6/


1

You can use .attr() to change it: $('tr textarea').attr("rows","30"); read more about jquery.attr()


1

The below code worked for me - window.open('location', '_self', ''); window.close(); Tested on Chrome 43.0.2357.81


1

Probably best to just let the user know that an update is available, and not worry about the platform. Also it's not clear how cross-browser this script is. You may have to resort to browser sniffing (not usually recommended) to be absolutely sure. You can use the scriptHandler property of the GM_info object, if you are only concerned about Chrome ...


1

Step 1: Require CoffeeScript In your ==UserScript== definition, add: // @require http://coffeescript.org/extras/coffee-script.js Step 2: Define the evaluator function and write your CS The source uses JS "inline string" then compiles it. Full Example: // ==UserScript== // @name _Coffeescript test // @include http://stackoverflow.com/questions/* ...


1

Tampermonkey scripts are run in a separate scope. This means that to make a function available globally you'll want to do something along the following: window['updateGUI'] = function () {...} If you want to add a number of functions to the global scope, it's better to store them under a single object and address your functions through there. That helps ...


1

Send your request to http://pastebin.com/api/api_post.php instead of http://pastebin.com/post.php.


1

Just find out all cookies start with "Cookie" and then do the same as that answer one by one. document.cookie.split('; ') .map(function (x) { return x.split('=', 1)[0]; }) .filter(function (x) { return x.substring(0, 6) === 'Cookie'; }) .forEach(function (name){ // set the domain var domain = ".jsfiddle.net"; // get a ...


1

You can't block cookies, but you can often erase them after they've been set (¡but not always!). Get a list of "Cookie###" cookies and loop through them with regex: var mtch; var targCookRgx = /[; ]*(Cookie\d+)=/gi; //-- Doc.cookie value will be changing in while() var oldCookie = document.cookie; while ( (mtch = targCookRgx.exec (oldCookie) ) != null) ...



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