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7

I've experienced that, at least with the Cygwin version of tar I'm using ("CYGWIN_NT-5.1 1.7.17(0.262/5/3) 2012-10-19 14:39 i686 Cygwin" on a Windows XP Home Edition SP3 machine), the order of options is important. While this construction worked for me: tar cfvz target.tgz --exclude='<dir1>' --exclude='<dir2>' target_dir that one didn't work: ...


7

z means (un)z̲ip. x means ex̲tract files from the archive. v means print the filenames v̲erbosely. f means the following argument is a f̱ilename.


7

Yes, a TarFile object (what tarfile.open() returns) can and should be closed. You can use the object as a context manager, in a with statement, to have it closed automatically: with tarfile.open(name, 'r:*') as f: # do whatever return result A TarFile object should be treated like any other file object in Python; you could rely on the file ...


6

Neither the tar format nor the gz format has built-in support for password-protecting files. Use crypt or gpg on the file. http://www.cyberciti.biz/tips/linux-how-to-encrypt-and-decrypt-files-with-a-password.html tar cvvjf - /path/to/files | ccrypt > backup.tar.bz2.cpt or ccrypt backup.tar.bz2 Else you can also use zip zip -P password ...


6

I think you need to call tar_append_eof http://linux.die.net/man/3/tar_append_eof before closing the tar file. The tar_append_eof() function writes an EOF marker (two blocks of all zeros) to the tar file associated with t.


5

After running an intermediate commit of the docker image I could see, that /archive.tar.gz indeed is a directory. This means that docker automatically extracts archives when adding them during image creation. Now I could also find this documented in docker documentation. (edit: files, e.g. .sql.gz, are not decompressed on adding)


5

Switch -J only works on newer systems. Universal command is: To make .tar.xz archive tar cf - directory/ | xz -zf - > directory.tar.xz Explanation tar cf - directory reads directory/ and starts putting it to TAR format. Output of this operation is generated on the standard output. | pipes standard output to input of another ...


5

You can use zcat to stream the uncompressed contents into grep or whatever filter you want, without incurring space overhead. E.g. zcat bigfile.gz | grep PATTERN_I_NEED > much_smaller_sample Also, if it's just grep you're streaming to, you can use zgrep e.g. zgrep PATTERN_I_NEED bigfile.gz > much_smaller_sample but zgrep doesn't support 100% of ...


4

Can you try: tar -pxvzf xxx.tar.gz p == preserve permissions c == create archive v == verbose (print names while making tar) z == gzip f == tar file name Source


4

You don't actually seem to be calling the main function at all. To call a function, you need to use parentheses: main(). (And you shouldn't catch an exception if all you're going to do is print a useless canned message. Better to let the exception propagate so you can see what's actually going wrong.)


4

Anas, I think you need to use: tar -cPf myconfigs.tar -T myconfigs.list instead of your "cat" . cat should work too if you properly escape the filenames inside, but -T is better. UPDATED (to address your question in question's comments): I cannot comment in your question (don't have enough reputation), so I decided to improve my answer instead. The ...


4

you want to change $(($i++)) to ((i++)). see http://askubuntu.com/questions/385528/how-to-increment-a-variable-in-bash Let's deconstruct $(($i++)). going outwards, $i expands to 0. so we have the expression $((0++)). 0 can't be incremented since it is a value, not a variable. so you get your error message line 26: 0++: syntax error: operand expected ...


4

Use compress/gzip in combination with archive/tar or use os/exec to call tar and gzip directly if you don't like to implement all of that in Go.


4

Use the "-T" option to pass a file to tar that contains the filenames to tar up. tar -cv -T file_list.txt -f tarball.tar


4

Use gunzip -c. -c, --stdout write on standard output, keep original files unchanged Or tar only: tar -xzf ${Chosendata}.


4

This overcame this issue described in the other answer. find main_directory/ -name "myfile.txt" | tar -czvf mytar.tar.gz -T -


3

Yeah I think that will work. Because gzip is a filtering compression, which means it can compress and decompress a stream of data, in a sort of incremental way. This implies that the compressed data that's already written will not change later, so you can copy with rsync a partial file and continue copying the rest later. If in doubt, do a proof of concept ...


3

Have you looked in the documentation? import tarfile archive = tarfile.TarFile('/path/to/my/tarfile.tar') max_size = 0 max_name = None for file in archive.getmembers(): if file.size > max_size: max_size = file.size max_name = file.name print(max_size) print(max_name)


3

Having a short look at the manpage clarifies your issue: -p, --preserve-permissions, --same-permissions extract information about file permissions (default for superuser) But mind, that untaring your archive on some filesystems like FAT won't preserve permissions as they don't support it. Also the numeric owner / access time preserve might be ...


3

Only the PASE tar utility accepts [ -L InputList ] as a parameter. Usage: tar -{c|r|t|u|x} [ -BdDEFhilmopRUsvw ] [ -Number ] [ -f TarFile ] [ -b Blocks ] [ -S [ Feet ] | [ Feet@Density ] | [ Blocksb ] ] [ -L InputList ] [-X ExcludeFile] [ -N Blocks ] [ -C Directory ] File ... Usage: tar {c|r|t|u|x} [ ...


3

Is it possible not to extract this into a seperate file, and read it in memory somehow? Maybe into a giant String or something? Yea sure. Just replace the code in the inner loop that is openning files and writing to them with code that writes to a ByteArrayOutputStream ... or a series of such streams. The natural representation of the data that you ...


3

Don't use cat's output like that otherwise space is considered a delimiter and a separete argument to the tar command. You can use -T tar option: tar -cPv -T myconfigs.list -f myconfigs.tar


3

System.IO.Packaging has a ZipPackage implementation that supports zip files. Any other compression formats are not supported natively and you would have to look for third party support for those. DotNetZip also has support for zip files, but the API may be more approachable than the built in .net ZipPackage. SharpZipLib has support for a few more file ...


3

for file in *.tar.gz; do tar xzvf "${file}" && rm "${file}"; done Don't forget to quote your variables to account for funky filenames with whitespace.


3

Try This tar -cf file.tar file-to-compress ; xz -z file.tar tar.gz and tar.xz is not the same Xz is best compression. dont use pipe | because this run simultaneous commands, but the ";" or "&" executes commands one after another.


3

The GNU tar man page doesn't seem to have -y, but my BSD tar man page does: -y (c mode only) Compress the resulting archive with bzip2(1). In extract or list modes, this option is ignored. Note that, unlike other tar implementations, this implementation recognizes bzip2 compression automatically when reading archives. ...


3

You cannot monkey patch or otherwise override a function from a Haskell module, and therefore no workaround will let you avoid the safety measures of the library. What you can do, however, is use the functionality in Codec.Archive.Tar to modify the tar entry paths before unpacking so that they won't be absolute any more. Specifically, there is a ...


3

This is why you should never use find and xargs without -print0 and -0 or compatible options. The filename ./. /01.pdf is split up into ./. and /01.pdf, and ./. is equivalent to ., i.e. the entire current directory. There's another, more subtle problem too: xargs doesn't run a command with input as parameters. It runs multiple commands with chunks of ...


3

You misunderstand the return value of read of Archive::Tar: $tar->read ( $filename|$handle, [$compressed, {opt => 'val'}] ) Returns the number of files read in scalar context, and a list of Archive::Tar::File objects in list context. Please change the following if(my $error = $tar->read($file)) { die "Can't read $file : $!"; } to ...


3

The very first dash is unnecessary, you could equally write: tar cvf ... The second dash belongs with the f option and it says "instead of creating a named file in the filesystem, write the tarred up files onto stdout". That stdout is then passed through the pipe into ssh. The corresponding untar on the remote machine is untarring from its stdin in ...



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