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18

Use the -J compression option for xz. And remember to man tar :) tar cfJ <archive.tar.xz> <files>


12

You can use the option -C (or --directory if you prefer long options) to give the target directory of your choice in case you are using the Gnu version of tar. The directory should exist: mkdir foo tar -xzf bar.tar.gz -C foo If you are not using a tar capable of extracting to a specific directory, you can simlpy cd into your target directory prior to ...


9

tar -cjf site1.tar.bz2 -C /var/www/site1 .


9

find ./someDir -name "*.php" -o -name "*.html" | tar -cf my_archive -T -


9

If you want to create tar.gz and you are using PHP 5.3+, you can use PharData class: try { $a = new PharData('archive.tar'); // ADD FILES TO archive.tar FILE $a->addFile('data.xls'); $a->addFile('index.php'); // COMPRESS archive.tar FILE. COMPRESSED FILE WILL BE archive.tar.gz $a->compress(Phar::GZ); // NOTE THAT BOTH ...


7

gzip -dc archive.tar.gz | tar -xf - -C /destination or, with GNU tar tar xzf archive.tar.gz -C /destination


6

The main issue here is that there is no archive.tar state. The reason for that is probably misunderstanding of so-called modules and states. The archive is module with some functions you can call from cli like: salt '*' archive.tar cjvf /tmp/tarfile.tar.bz2 /tmp/file_1,/tmp/file_2 Now there is a way to actually use the module from your states. There is a ...


6

I've experienced that, at least with the Cygwin version of tar I'm using ("CYGWIN_NT-5.1 1.7.17(0.262/5/3) 2012-10-19 14:39 i686 Cygwin" on a Windows XP Home Edition SP3 machine), the order of options is important. While this construction worked for me: tar cfvz target.tgz --exclude='<dir1>' --exclude='<dir2>' target_dir that one didn't work: ...


5

You need to use the --exclude option: tar -zc -f test.tar.gz --exclude='*.xdr' *


5

You put the call to next inside your if, so it's only executed if you extracted the file. There's nothing that modifies $fil inside the loop if the file is not extracted. You can simplify your code quite a bit by just calling the iterator in the condition of the while loop. Also, you can use the =~ binding operator instead of storing the name in $_. And ...


4

I realize this thread is more than a few years old, but I'm commenting for those people who stumble upon this thread with the error. Whenever you use a compression option, tar implicitly opens a connection to the underlying program using a pipe. So, in the OP's example: tar -xvzf $filename.tar.gz, what tar will actually do is run something similar to this: ...


4

What's going wrong: Tar files are stored interleaved. They come in the order header, data, header, data, header, data, etc. When you enumerated the files with getmembers(), you've already read through the entire file to get the headers. Then when you asked the tarfile object to read the data, it tried to seek backward from the last header to the first data. ...


4

You don't actually seem to be calling the main function at all. To call a function, you need to use parentheses: main(). (And you shouldn't catch an exception if all you're going to do is print a useless canned message. Better to let the exception propagate so you can see what's actually going wrong.)


4

Anas, I think you need to use: tar -cPf myconfigs.tar -T myconfigs.list instead of your "cat" . cat should work too if you properly escape the filenames inside, but -T is better. UPDATED (to address your question in question's comments): I cannot comment in your question (don't have enough reputation), so I decided to improve my answer instead. The ...


4

you want to change $(($i++)) to ((i++)). see http://askubuntu.com/questions/385528/how-to-increment-a-variable-in-bash Let's deconstruct $(($i++)). going outwards, $i expands to 0. so we have the expression $((0++)). 0 can't be incremented since it is a value, not a variable. so you get your error message line 26: 0++: syntax error: operand expected ...


4

Use gunzip -c. -c, --stdout write on standard output, keep original files unchanged Or tar only: tar -xzf ${Chosendata}.


4

After running an intermediate commit of the docker image I could see, that /archive.tar.gz indeed is a directory. This means that docker automatically extracts archives when adding them during image creation. Now I could also find this documented in docker documentation. (edit: files, e.g. .sql.gz, are not decompressed on adding)


4

Neither the tar format nor the gz format has built-in support for password-protecting files. Use crypt or gpg on the file. http://www.cyberciti.biz/tips/linux-how-to-encrypt-and-decrypt-files-with-a-password.html tar cvvjf - /path/to/files | ccrypt > backup.tar.bz2.cpt or ccrypt backup.tar.bz2 Else you can also use zip zip -P password ...


3

Unfortunately you cannot just open files from the network. Things are a bit more complex here. You have to instruct the interpreter to create a network request and create an object representing the request state. This can be done using the urllib module. import urllib.request import tarfile thetarfile = ...


3

GNU tar will take a transform option, which is just a sed expression that transforms the file name in the archive. You will also probably want to pipe to xargs if your list of files is very large. cat filelist | xargs tar -rvf archive.tar --transform='s|.*/||g' Keep in mind that this is appending to a tar archive (it will create one if it does not exist ...


3

One method is: tar -cf my_archive.tar $( find -name "*.php" -or "*.html" ) There are some caveats with this method however: It will fail if there are any files or directories with spaces in them, and it will fail if there are so many files that the maximum command line length is full. A workaround to these could be to output the contents of the find ...


3

tar --lzip -xvf gmp-5.1.2.tar.lz Worked for me


3

Although Florian's answer is right, it does not take into account tar LongLinks (Try extracting jdk-7u40-linux-i586.tar.gz from oracle :P ). The following code should be able to do this: require 'rubygems/package' require 'zlib' TAR_LONGLINK = '././@LongLink' tar_gz_archive = '/path/to/archive.tar.gz' destination = '/where/extract/to' ...


3

Your filenames and variables are incorrect: ${imageName-$date} Should be ${imageName}${date} and ${imageName}:${date}.tar.gz is going to be interpreted as an NFS location because of the : in the name, e.g. server:filename. Replace the : with a - or other non-special character.


3

Have a look at --transform/--xform, it gives you the opportunity to massage the file name as the file is added to the archive: % mkdir my_directory % touch my_directory/file1 % touch my_directory/file2 % touch my_directory/.hiddenfile1 % touch my_directory/.hiddenfile2 % tar -v -c -f my_dir.tgz --xform='s,my_directory/,,' $(find my_directory -type f) ...


3

Use the -maxdepth option of find to limit the recursion depth: find root/ -maxdepth 2 -name 'the_folder' -type d Try man find for lots of useful options that find offers. You will be surprised. For example, you can do away with the | xargs by using find's -exec option: find root/ -maxdepth 2 -name 'the_folder' -type d -exec tar cvf myTar.tar {} +


3

In your case, wouldn't just this be enough? tar cfv mytar.tar root/*/the_folder/


3

Have you looked in the documentation? import tarfile archive = tarfile.TarFile('/path/to/my/tarfile.tar') max_size = 0 max_name = None for file in archive.getmembers(): if file.size > max_size: max_size = file.size max_name = file.name print(max_size) print(max_name)


3

Yeah I think that will work. Because gzip is a filtering compression, which means it can compress and decompress a stream of data, in a sort of incremental way. This implies that the compressed data that's already written will not change later, so you can copy with rsync a partial file and continue copying the rest later. If in doubt, do a proof of concept ...



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