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35

I have found this on the rabbitmq website it is near the bottom so I have quoted the relevant part below. The tl;dr version is that you should have 1 connection per application and 1 channel per thread. Hope that helps. Connections AMQP connections are typically long-lived. AMQP is an application level protocol that uses TCP for reliable ...


33

You've added a task with that exact name before. Although it's already run, executed task names are kept around for some time to prevent accidental duplicates. If you're assigning task names, you should be using ones that are globally unique to prevent this occurring.


27

My suggestions to get this working with Q.js are below. The key is that anytime you want to do something asynchronously, you should return a promise, and once the task is completed you should resolve that promise. That allows the callers of the function to listen for the task to be completed and then do something else. As before, I have commented my changes ...


19

Using Saxon's excellent answer, I was able to do the same thing using testbed instead of gaetestbed. Here is what I did. Added this to my setUp(): self.taskqueue_stub = apiproxy_stub_map.apiproxy.GetStub('taskqueue') Then, in my test, I used the following: # Execute the task in the taskqueue tasks = self.taskqueue_stub.GetTasks("default") ...


17

bucket-size is perfectly described here: Limits the burstiness of the queue's processing, i.e. a higher bucket size allows bigger spikes in the queue's execution rate. For example, consider a queue with a rate of 5/s and a bucket size of 10. If that queue has been inactive for some time (allowing its "token bucket" to fill up), and 20 tasks are suddenly ...


11

Another (cleaner) option to achieve this is to use the task queue stub within the testbed. To do this you first have to initialize the task queue stub by adding the following to your setUp() method: self.testbed = init_testbed() self.testbed.init_taskqueue_stub() The tasks scheduler can be accessed using the following code: taskq = ...


10

You may specify which queue to add a task to by passing a queue_name parameter (documentation). queue_name defaults to "default". Example: taskqueue.Task(url='...', params={...}).add(queue_name='my_custom_queue')


9

In a pull queue you enqueue tasks into the queue and your code needs to pull them, you pull them by leasing tasks from the queue and deleting the tasks. if you don't delete the tasks and the lease time is expired the system will return the tasks back to the queue. You can use pull queue (for example) to aggregate a multiple work units that can be ...


8

When you run code like taskqueue.add(url='/worker', params={'cursor': cursor}) you are enqueueing a task; scheduling a request to execute out of band using the parameters you provide. You can apparently schedule up to 100 of these in one operation. I don't think you want to, though. Task chaining would make this a lot simpler: Your worker task would do ...


8

Have you tried doing this: queue.add(TaskOptions.Builder .url("/SQ") .param("p1Name", p1Value) .param("p2Name", p2Value) .param("p3Name", p3Value) // etc );


8

File "C:\Python27\lib\SocketServer.py" App Engine runs with Python 2.5 and you are using Python 2.7.


8

Tasks can bypass login: admin restrictions, however users.is_current_user_admin() will still return false, as there is technically no current user. Using Django-nonrel shouldn't stop you from protecting your tasks with app.yaml. Just add a protected handler above your Django catch-all: handlers: - url: /tasks/.+ script: main.py login: admin - ...


8

Yes this is a well-known pattern for handling long-lived tasks at the back end of a web application. Depending on your langauge and application framework there are a number of queue implementations out there - e.g. Resque or Beanstalkd or ActiveMQ or if your performance requirements are not high you can use a database table as a kind of queue. The basic ...


8

I've had pretty good success with using ZeroMQ for this sort of problem, both with Perl and other languages. In my experience, the ZeroMQ module appears to be the most reliable binding for Perl currently.


7

It will execute no sooner than 10 minutes from now (it may execute later if the queue is full, naturally).


7

I use this approach: import datetime import logging import re import urllib from google.appengine.ext import blobstore from google.appengine.ext import db from google.appengine.ext import webapp from google.appengine.ext.webapp import blobstore_handlers from google.appengine.ext.webapp import util from google.appengine.ext.webapp import template from ...


7

There's not currently any way to advise the App Engine infrastructure about this. You could have your tasks return a non-200 status code if they shouldn't run now, in which case they'll be automatically retried (possibly on another instance), but that could lead to a lot of churn. Backends are probably your best option. If you set up dynamic backends, ...


7

Yes, use a tuple: fruit = 'banana' colour = 'yellow' q.put((fruit, colour)) It should be automatically unpacked (should, because I can't try it atm).


7

You can simply check job as a bool: while (auto job = gen()) { job(); } That's a sort of shorthand which assigns job from gen() each time through the loop, stopping when job evaluates as false, relying on std::function<>::operator bool: http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/utility/functional/function/operator_bool


6

It's possible to add tasks from within tasks. I'm doing it in my application. It's very useful when you want to migrate a large set of entities : one task processes a small chunk of entities then adds itself to the queue in order to process the rest until the migration is over. I am not sure what is the problem with your code. Have you implemented the ...


6

Well, if you're on Linux, you can use pcntl_fork to fork children off. The "master" then watches the children. Each child completes its task and then exists normally. Personally, in my implementations I've never needed a message queue. I simply used an array in the "master" with locks. When a child got a job, it would write a lock file with the job id ...


6

When I say throughput I mean the average latency from sending a task until it's been executed. With roundtrip I mean the average time it takes to send a task, executing it, sending the result back and retrieving the result. As I said in the comments I currently don't have any official numbers to share, but with the right configuration Celery is low latency ...


6

The dev app server is single-threaded, so it can't run tasks in the background while the foreground thread is running the tests. I modified TaskQueueTestCase in taskqueue.py in gaetestbed to add the following function: def execute_tasks(self, application): """ Executes all currently queued tasks, and also removes them from the queue. The ...


6

Solution 2 is bogus. It's an ugly hack and it does not ensure memory synchronization. I would say go with solution 1, but I'm a little bit skeptical of the fact that you mentioned "memory pool" to begin with. Are you just trying to allocate memory, or is there some other resource you're managing (e.g. slots in some special kind of memory, memory-mapped ...


6

Celery supports time limiting. You can use time limits to kill long running tasks. Beside killing tasks you can use soft limits which enable to handle SoftTimeLimitExceeded exceptions in tasks and terminate tasks cleanly. from celery.task import task from celery.exceptions import SoftTimeLimitExceeded @task def mytask(): try: do_work() ...


6

Pick any one of the following HTTP headers: X-AppEngine-QueueName, the name of the queue (possibly default) X-AppEngine-TaskName, the name of the task, or a system-generated unique ID if no name was specified X-AppEngine-TaskRetryCount, the number of times this task has been retried; for the first attempt, this value is 0 X-AppEngine-TaskETA, the target ...


6

There is one flaw with this, which I recently discovered myself because I am also using this method of ensuring tasks execute sequentially. In my application I had thousands of instances of these mini-queues and quickly discovered I was having memory issues. Since these queues were often idle I was holding onto the last completed task object for a long time ...


6

We had similar issues (with long running requests). We solved them by turning-off the default ndb cache. You can read more about it here


5

Use the heapq module in the standard library. You don't specify how you wanted to associate priorities with dictionaries, but here's a simple implementation: import heapq class MyPriQueue(object): def __init__(self): self.heap = [] def add(self, d, pri): heapq.heappush(self.heap, (pri, d)) def get(self): pri, d = ...


5

Yes, worker would be a servlet which can handle a request with POST parameters. If you want an asynchronous call from client's point of view then RPC is enough (from server's point of view it is still synchronous). If you want to do "delayed" jobs which don't talk to your client, you can use a task queue.



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