Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

8

As the message says: you can't do that. You could take a copy of the parameter value, and capture that, for example: public Action CallDoSomeMagic(string foo, ref string bar) { var snapshot = bar; return new Action(() => DoSomeMagic(foo, ref snapshot)); } But note that updates to snapshot are not visible outside the caller via bar. The ...


4

Task.WhenAll() doesn't start the tasks - it just waits for them. Likewise, calling an async method doesn't actually force parallelization - it doesn't introduce a new thread, or anything like that. You only get new threads if: You await something which hasn't completed, and your synchronization context schedules the continuation on a new thread (which it ...


4

Both answers didn't mention the awaitable Task.WhenAll: var task1 = DoWorkAsync(); var task2 = DoMoreWorkAsync(); await Task.WhenAll(task1, task2); The main difference between Task.WaitAll and Task.WhenAll is that the former will block (similar to using Wait on a single task) while the latter will not and can be awaited, yielding control back to the ...


4

Gigi, unfortunately the semantic nature of FromAsync indicates that you are only adapting an asynchronous process to TPL's API (TPL = Microsoft's Task Parallel Library) In essence, TPL's ReadAsync controls the async behaviour itself, whilst FromAsync only wraps the behaviour (but doesn't control it). Now since Cancellation is a TPL specific construct, and ...


3

No, there is no generic way to cancel such a task. Cancellation is API specific. For example, WebClient has a Cancel method. A Socket or a FileStream needs to be Close'd to cancel an outstanding call. Web-service clients have even different ways of aborting calls. ... This is because the implementer of the IO operation must support cancellation. It ...


2

As you say "This runs at the end of my console application", i am assuming your Main method is terminating before Task.Factory.Startnew has a chance to finish running your code in the background thread. You should either: Run this code synchronously, without starting a new thread (this would be my recommended approach) Explicitly wait for the task to ...


2

It's a warning, not an error, and does not prevent building an executable (unless you've turned on "treat warnings as errors"). It's a hint from the compiler that you may have made a mistake in creating a variable that is never used. You can tell the compiler that you don't indend to use Task1 by declaring it as a constant, like this: Task1 : constant ...


2

Your problem seems to lay with semaphore.WaitOne() An async method will run synchronously until it hits its first await. In your code, the first await is only after the WaitOne is signaled. The fact that a method is async certainly does not mean it runs on multiple threads, it usually means the opposite. Do get around this, use SemaphoreSlim.WaitAsync, ...


2

you could create many tasks like: List<Task> TaskList = new List<Task>(); foreach(...) { var LastTask = new Task(SomeFunction); LastTask.Start(); TaskList.Add(LastTask); } Task.WaitAll(TaskList.ToArray()); Hope it helps...


2

The compilation error says exactly what you're doing wrong - you're trying to use the name n1 for two different things. You've got a local variable here: int n1 = 5; ... and then you're also trying to use it your lambda expression parameter name. You need to use a different parameter name... or just use your current approach which captures n1 and doesn't ...


2

There isn't a non generic TaskCompletionSource and considering all you want is a task without a result, the result doesn't matter. The caller doesn't know and doesn't care in this case that the Task is actually a Task<object>, The caller just await's it, and get an exception if there is one. The caller is unaware of the actual result. This of course ...


2

There is no non-generic TaskCompletionSource class for creating instances of Task which are not instances of Task<T>. This leaves two options for the generic type parameter for TaskCompletionSource<T> when you don't care about (or are not providing) the return value: Use an arbitrary existing type, such as object, as the return type. Set the ...


2

Im not sure you really need a MonitoredTask for this. You can capture the custom culture using closure: public static Task ExecuteTask(Action action, string name) { var customCulture = CustomCultureInfo.CurrentCulture; return Task.Factory.StartNew(() => { // use customCulture variable as needed // inside the generated task. }); ...


1

As the error says, you cannot implicitly (or explicitly for that matter) convert a DataTable to a Task<DataTable>. From MSDN: You specify Task<TResult> as the return type of an async method if the return statement of the method specifies an operand of type TResult. Therefore you should just return the DataTable object from your method like ...


1

Have a look to http://quartz-scheduler.net/ which should fulfill your needs.


1

I don't particularly understand why the method should return Task rather than Task<object> Because when you return Task<Object> it means that when this method completes it will produce some useful value of type Object. in this case we're not producing any result, That's why stephen choose to return Task. If we're dealing with ...


1

If you returned a Task<object>, then var result = await RunAsync(...) would always return null, since that's what you're setting the result to. The client doesn't care about this, so you just return a Task. Ideally, you would use a TaskCompletionSource internally, instead of a TaskCompletionSource<object>, and just call something like ...


1

Your core problem is here: BlockingCollection<Action> Action is a void-returning delegate type, so when you pass an async lambda to Add, it is creating an async void method. There are several reasons to avoid async void; one is that it's not possible to catch exceptions from them using try/catch. You could change the delegate type to be compatible ...


1

Do you want to chain the Tasks, or can they be invoked in a parallel manner? For chaining Just do something like Task.Run(...).ContinueWith(...).ContinueWith(...).ContinueWith(...); Task.Factory.StartNew(...).ContinueWith(...).ContinueWith(...).ContinueWith(...); and don't forget to check the previous Task instance in each ContinueWith as it might be ...


1

As others have already mentioned, there is no clean way of achieving what you're asking for. The notion of cancellation was absent from the Asynchronous Programming Model; thus, it couldn't be retrofitted through the FromAsync converters. However, you can introduce cancellation for the Task that wraps the asynchronous operation. This will not cancel the ...


1

await Task.Delay(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(5)); This should allow other tasks to run, but I suspect they are blocked on: semaphore.WaitOne(); Mixing concurrency styles (in this case using Tasks and manual control with a synchronisation object) is very hard to get right. (You seem to be trying to get the same value by having multiple concurrent tasks ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible