Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

4

Since from what I understand about Tasks they don't create new threads to run the tasks on The Task doesn't necessarily create a new thread itself, but Task.Factory.StartNew does. It schedules the task to execute using the current task scheduler, which by default fetches a worker thread from the thread pool. Please read: ...


3

First, move your code out of your perform click action. private async void checkUpdateButton_Click(object sender, EventArgs e) { await CheckForUpdate(); } private async Task CheckForUpdate() { await startDownload(versionLink, versionSaveTo); await checkVersion(); Console.WriteLine(needsUpdate); } You can then call that same function in ...


3

Since your goal is merely to wait until the cancellation token is cancelled, you should do that. For reasons others have explained, using WhenAll on an infinite sequence of tasks isn't the way to go about that. There are easier ways to get a task that will never complete. await new TaskCompletionSource<bool>().Task .ContinueWith(t => { }, ...


3

Task.WhenAll will not work with an infinite number of tasks. It will first (synchronously) wait for the enumerable to finish, and then (asynchronously) wait for them all to complete. If you want to react to a sequence in an asynchronous way, then you need to use IObservable<Task> (Reactive Extensions). You can use a TPL Dataflow BufferBlock as a ...


2

You should not Swallow the exception after you call ThrowIfCancellationRequested(), so the caller (the Start() method) can be notified of the change in task status. If you swallow the exception, the task is considered to be successfully completed (Status = RanToCompletion), or still Running if you poll it immediately after you fire the cancellation. The ...


2

Question one : why do I fail at updating the ProgressBar by setting directly its progress inside of the loop (progressProperty being not binded) ? Same occurs if I want to set it (non-)visible inside of the loop. Becouse all changes of the UI that effects the current displayed Stage have to executed in JavaFX Application Thread. Your Task is executed in ...


2

In your first case there's no need for the lambda to be async. There is no need to await the task. You can just use Result because you know that the task has already completed by that point in time. For your second example, you're scheduling the thread pool thread to perform the creation of a state machine that will merely schedule some code to run when ...


1

If you are looking to try and time task switches, I would assume you need a timer at least at the microsecond (us) level. Usually, timers/clocks this fine grained are only provided by the platform you are running on. If you are working on an embedded system, you can try and read thru the manuals for your board support package (if there is one) to see if ...


1

I think the TPL is designed to eagerly complete tasks if the CancellationToken is set. Part of the reason you are seeing this behavior is because you are calling t.Wait(cts.Token). The overload that takes a CancellationToken will stop waiting if the token is set even if the task hasn't ran to completion. It's the same with ContinueWith if you pass in a ...


1

You can use the approach of creating the timer. Now if you can schedule task based on system clock (for instance start at 3 PM) then you can use next approach. Instead of changing the timer interval so that it will fire at that specific time you keep your timer at 1 minute interval. And then everytime the timer fires you simply check if the system time is ...


1

Like @Ben Robinson said the use of await automatically registers the rest of the method as a continuation which is only executed if the operation succeeds, otherwise an exception is thrown. I'd change my method to remove the ContinueWith calls and consider using ConfigureAwait(false) if you don't need to return to the current SynchrionizationContext after ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible