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11

I believe you are looking for: Task.WaitAll(tasks.ToArray()); https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd270695(v=vs.110).aspx


7

You have a couple of misconceptions here. Firstly, when you call DoIt, it returns a Task that has already begun execution. Execution doesn't start only when you await the Task. You also create a closure over the someString variable, the value of which does not change when you reassign the class-level field: Task DoIt(string someString) { return ...


6

Simply moving the task instantiations above the task body declarations will make them visible to the task bodies, and with this change, your example compiles successfully. That is... Procedure Task_Prog is task type Task_one is entry Rendezvous_One; end Task_one; task type Task_Two is entry Rendezvous_Two; end Task_Two; ...


5

In both cases, you are making a closure. However, you're making a closure over different things in the two cases. In the first case, you're making an anonymous method with a closure over this - when you finally execute the delegate, it will take the current value of this, get the current value of this.token and use that. So you see the modified value. In ...


5

if you want to run the tasks one after the other, await Task.Run(() => new XyzServices().ProcessXyz()); await Task.Delay(ConfigReader.CronReRunTimeInSeconds * 1000); if you want to run them concurrently, as the task scheduler permits, await Task.WhenAll(new[] { Task.Run(() => new XyzServices().ProcessXyz()), Task.Run(() => ...


5

Let's break down each case. Starting with the Action<T>: My explanation: the variable is not pushed onto the stack until the action executes, so it will be the changed one This hasn't anything to do with the stack. The compiler generates the following from your first code snippet: public foo() { this.token = "Initial Value"; } private ...


3

I would feel better about my answer if I could see how your TaskN methods were implemented. Specifically, I would want to validate the need for your TaskN method calls to be wrapped inside calls to Task.Run() if they are already returning a Task return value. But personally, I would just use the async-await style of programming. I find it fairly easy to ...


3

From your question it appears that you want to unload the dynamically loaded assembly if any upgrade is available, then reload the latest assembly. The cancellation taken will no help in this case. In fact I don't see you are using cancellation token anywhere. The only way to unload a dynamically loaded assembly is to fist load the the assembly in separate ...


3

public Task DoWork() {} can be awaited in an async call public void DoWork() {} don't


2

My goal is to stop this asynchronous operation before doing the navigation to another page. What is your recommendation? Pass down a CancellationToken to your async method, and monitor on that token. If the user wants to navigate away to page two, use the CancellationTokenSource to cancel that operation. An example would be: private ...


2

In your sample, you started a new asynchronous task, while at the same time your application continues its execution to the end of the Main method and suddenly exits before your new task even has a chance of executing its content (in your case, the while loop). You need to wait for your task to complete (or in your case, execute until you kill it). Try ...


2

I don't fully understand the code in question but it is very easy to link tasks by dependency. Example: var t1 = ...; var t2 = ...; var t3 = Task.WhenAll(t1, t2).ContinueWith(_ => RunT3(t1.Result, t2.Result)); You can express an arbitrary dependency DAG like that. This also makes it unnecessary to store into local variables, although you can do that if ...


2

Since Task1, Task2, ... , TaskN are in scope for the call of WhenAll, and because by the time ContinueWith passes control to your next task all the earlier tasks are guaranteed to finish, it is safe to use TaskX.Result inside the code implementing continuations: .ContinueWith(tsks=> { var resTask1 = Task1.Result; ... ...


2

it feels like I'm not programming the correct way and, most importantly, I'm afraid of developing bad habits. I definitely want to learn the best ways this should be done... First, distinguish between asynchronous and parallel, which are two different forms of concurrency. An operation is a good match for "asynchronous" if it doesn't need a thread ...


1

I used my tool FeinCtrl and found that CreateUserTask command is defined in VS2015. However, when I bound it to a keyboard shortcut, it didn't do anything. Same commands in VS2013 adds an empty user task and, if TaskList is visible with User Tasks selected - places an input caret into that new task.


1

Have You Checked with MSDN? https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/txtwdysk.aspx It doesn't work for me either, but you likely have more practice with VS than I do...


1

Whenever you have a task that may take sometime to get executed or there is a possibility of delayed response, you do not want your JavaFX Application thread to wait for it, because, as long as the JavaFX Application thread waits for the response, the UI becomes unresponsive. A few examples where you may want to use a background thread is : An I/O ...


1

If you want to wait all tasks to finish and then restart them, Marks's answer is correct. But if you want ThreadCount tasks to be running at any time (start a new task as soon as any one of them ends), then void Run() { SemaphoreSlim sem = new SemaphoreSlim(ConfigReader.ThreadCount); Task.Run(() => { while (true) { ...



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