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3

The first will create many asynchronous Tasks that each call DoWork with the given symbol. The second will create one asynchronous Task that will do the entire loop before exiting.


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Given a periodic task model in which tasks are released periodically, offset and jitter are often defined as follows: Offset refers to the time delay experienced by the first job (instance) of a periodic task. Jitter is the maximum deviation from the periodic release times that a job (instance) can experience.


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Expanding on User 12345678's answer, you could do something like the below. private void RunTasks() { Dictionary<string, string> dict = new Dictionary<string, string>(); List<Task> tasks = new List<Task>(); foreach (KeyValuePair<string,string> kvp in dict) { Console....


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What you've encountered is called a closure and it's not unique to tasks. Every time you use a variable in a lambda, it gets captured by the compiler in a special class it builds just for this purpose. The compiler generates roughly something like: public void Main() { var closure = new Main_Closure(); closure.h = new HelloWorld() { Name = "A" }; ...


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There is probably nothing wrong. Sounds like AppInsights is being a bit paranoid. This is most commonly caused by one of two things. One is a "wait for any" kind of logical fork in your code. This is usually some code that uses Task.WhenAny. I recommend searching your code for "WhenAny". The other is a "fire and forget" kind of logic. This is usually code ...


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No, I believe what you want to do is not a reasonable possibility the way you've described. When task A gets preempted, the scheduler saves the context of task A and restores the context of task B. The saved context of task A includes the local variables that were in use when it got switched out and the program counter (address of the instruction that was ...


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You can handle it inside task itself or outside by the caller, just mind the await on Task.Run, this ensures you catch exception instead of making it a silent death.` Func<Task> action = async () => { Console.WriteLine("Action start..."); await Task.Delay(1000); throw new Exception("Exception from an async action"); }; try { ...



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