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4

Since you want your method to be asyncrhonous, when you want to get the result of a Task you should use await, not Result, so that the action is performed asynchronously, so you can write that operation as: return await await Task.Delay(waittime).ContinueWith(t => Get<T>(waitime)); Alternatively, whenever you have two awaits you can use Unwrap ...


4

Check out the Task.WaitAny method: Waits for any of the provided Task objects to complete execution. Example from the documentation: var t1 = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => DoOperation1()); var t2 = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => DoOperation2()); Task.WaitAny(t1, t2)


3

Yes the documentation for Task.IsFaulted explicitly states that: If IsFaulted is true, the task's Status will be equal to Faulted, and its Exception property will be non-null. The reference source code does list the as an almost certainly. In FinishStageTwo we see that the internal m_state is only set to faulted if exceptions where recorded: if ...


3

If a process' main thread is terminated, the process aborts. When a process is killed, all threads (and other owned resources) are closed/terminated/killed also. Therefore, if your process' main thread created a worker thread and the main thread is killed, the worker thread is also terminated. Don't be confused by the TaskCreationOptions.LongRunning enum - ...


3

Both of your options are pretty much equivalent and unnecessary. All you need to do to call an async method is simply just call it, and await the returned task: var task = logger.RecordAsynchSQL(id, lid, action); var result = await task; Or: var result = await logger.RecordAsynchSQL(id, lid, action); When you use Task.Run you are offloading to a ...


3

The task will run on a different thread so the data in the ThreadContext stack isn't available, you should use the log4net.LogicalThreadContext instead as data in that should follow the logical execution and still be visible to the Task


2

You can use something similar to WinForm's Application.DoEvents but for WPF, it involves using a flag, firing your task, not Waiting for it, but continiously processing UI messages in a loop until your task is done and sets the flag. e.g.: if (BackTestCollection.Any(bt => bt.TestStatus == TestStatus.Running)) { bool done = false; // Update ...


2

I don't think you have much choice than to block the return. However your updates should still run despite the UI thread being locked. I wouldn't use a ManualResetEventSlim, but just a simple wait() and a single task without a continuation. The reason for that is by default Task.Run prevents the child task (your continuation) from being attached to the ...


2

Did you try this: private async void StartButton_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e) { DownloadGameFile dlg = new DownloadGameFile(); await dlg.StartDownload(11825); } dlg.StartDownload must return a Task then.


2

await asynchronously unwraps the result of your task, whereas just using Result would block until the task had completed. See this explanantion from Jon Skeet.


2

Are you checking cancellationToken.IsCancelationRequested inside your code? I think that is the problem. It is should be something like that: // Do function 1 if (token.IsCancellationRequested) { return; } // Do function 2 // Were we already canceled? ct.ThrowIfCancellationRequested();// another variant // etc More details: ...


2

I would use a combination of Microsoft's Reactive Framework (NuGet "Rx-Main") and TPL for this. It becomes very simple. Here's the code: int nTotalTasks=10; string param1="test"; string param2="test"; IDisposable subscription = Observable .Range(0, 1000) .Select(i => Observable.FromAsync(() => Task.Factory.StartNew<bool>(() ...


1

The answer depends on whether the tasks to be scheduled are CPU or I/O bound. For CPU-intensive work I would use Parallel.For() API setting the number of thread/tasks through MaxDegreeOfParallelism property of ParallelOptions For I/O bound work the number of concurrently executing tasks can be significantly larger than the number of available CPUs, so the ...


1

Have you seen the BlockingCollection class? It allows you to have multiple threads running in parallel and you can wait from results from one task to execute another. See more information here.


1

This should be all you need, not complete, but all you need to do is wait on the first to complete and then run the second. Task.WaitAny(task to wait on); Task.Factory.StartNew()


1

Start a total of n LongRunningTasks, where n is the number of cores on your machine. Each task should run on one core. It would be a waste to create 50K new tasks for every I that you want to send. Instead design the tasks to accept I and the socket information - where this information is to be sent. Create a BlockingCollection<Tuple<I, ...


1

You need to check if the token has been cancelled. Below is a quick bit of code I wrote just to check how it works. Hopefully you'll be able to extract what you need from it... internal class TaskCancellationProblem { private CancellationTokenSource tokenSource; private CancellationToken token; public TaskCancellationProblem() { ...


1

Both functions should work. If the one with await is hanging forever it indicates that there is a SynchronizationContext present that tries to synchronise all tasks to a single thread and that thread is hanging due to something that is happening outside of this function. That is a very common case if the function is called from the context of WPF or Windows ...


1

task.Result is accessing the property's get accessor blocks the calling thread until the asynchronous operation is complete; it is equivalent to calling the Wait method. Once the result of an operation is available, it is stored and is returned immediately on subsequent calls to the Result property. Note that, if an exception occurred during the operation of ...


1

If you call an async method without await it'll simply return a task instead of executing the method. //This returns a task that can be consumed later Task task = logger.RecordAsynchSQL(id, lid, action); //This returns the integer result int result = await logger.RecordAsynchSQL(id, lid, action); //As you can see, you can wait for the previously created ...


1

Objects derived from DispatcherObject have thread affinity, i.e. once created they are "owned" by the calling thread. In WPF application it is usually UI thread. If BimtapSource instantiation is placed after await it will use the current context (UI in this case), which enables the consumption of this object by UI components: private async void ...


1

Your code becomes a lot simpler if you remove ContinueWith completely and just use the more modern await instead: public async Task<bool> DeletePost(string update_id, string authId) { if (Utility.NetworkStatus.HasInternetAccess) { try { var result = await APIs.DeletePost.DeletePostAPI(update_id, authId); if (result != null) ...



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