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6

Your code is fine as long as you're not modifying the erCount in multiple threads. In which case you'd need a lock or Interlocked.Increment. Your problem is you're not waiting for the started Task to complete. public static int erCount = 9; static void Main(string[] args) { var task = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => { ...do some task ...


4

Turning the problem over, all mosquitos that are two seconds old spawn another mosquito, so we need a little history, lets use an array: int[9] mosquitoHistory; Starting with a timer makes things complex, assuming things happen once every second, lets use a loop. for (i = 0, i++, i < 9) { If we can get the number of mosquitos from 2s ago int ...


4

You could use Interlocked.Increment(): public int erCount = 9; static void Main(string[] args){ var task = Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>{ ...do some task if(errorfound) Interlocked.Increment(ref erCount); }); task.Wait(); // Wait for the task to complete before showing the error count ...


3

It appears you are looking for a way to get an "autocomplete list" from text entered in a text box, where an ongoing async search is canceled when the text has changed since the search was started. As was mentioned in the comments, Rx (Reactive Extensions), provides very nice patterns for this, allowing you to easily connect your UI elements to cancellable ...


3

There is no overload of StartNew that is StartNew(Action, CancellationToken, CancellationToken). Most likely, the method being called here is StartNew(Action<object>, object, CancellationToken). This overload starts the Action, passing in the provided object (second argument) as the argument for this Action. I can only assume the reason for this ...


3

Task.FromResult(whatever) works for Task<TResult>, but until 4.6 there was nothing for the nongeneric task. You could use FromResult with a dummy value and implicitly cast it to Task, but that somewhat obfuscates the intent (you're not really returning any asynchronous value) and allocates objects underneath (whereas CompletedTask can be cached and ...


2

If you want to cancel a task in c#, you have to add a CancellationTokenSource that you can call to cancel the task It would look something along the lines of CancellationTokenSource cts = new CancellationTokenSource(); Task t = new Task(() => TaskRun(), cts.Token); t.Start(); cts.Cancel(); In your example it would more-or-less be like: // ... ...


2

You seem confused by the method signature itself. From your comment, you're actually calling public Task StartNew(Action<object> action, object state, CancellationToken cancellationToken). But when calling it, you are using the following Task.Factory.StartNew(MyTask, token, token). So, yes, you are using token twice and you are trying to ...


1

Instead of WaitHandle you can use TaskCompletionSource<T> and wait for TaskCompletionSource<T>.Task. TaskCompletionSource<object> completionSource = new TaskCompletionSource<object>(); public void functionA() { functionB.completed += doSomeStuff; Task runFunctionB = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => { functionB(); }); ...


1

I think the problem comes from bitbucket, it doesn't handle subtask, see this issue


1

I humbly direct you to the wikipedia article on Zipf's Law, Formally, let: N be the number of elements; k be their rank; s be the value of the exponent characterizing the distribution. Zipf's law then predicts that out of a population of N elements, the frequency of elements of rank k, f(k;s,N), is: There you go. There's your formula for the ...


1

The reason its not incrementing is: Console.Writeline(erCount.toString()); executes before the error count has been incremented. Move that inside the task at the end, and it should work. You probably need to have a read up on the Task parrallel library and how multithreading works.


1

From the task manager top menu, select to show the Process ID for this running process. Then on command prompt, taskkill /pid 1234 Where 1234 id the Process ID you want to kill.


1

This will kill it without knowing the pid, however it will kill all instances of wscript.exe. TASKKILL /F /IM wscript.exe


1

VBScripts do have a timeout parameter - see cscript /?. taskkill /im wscript.exe /im cscript.exe /f will kill all running vbscripts. If you want to be particular how do you tell the running scripts apart.


1

Personally, I'd publish an event from the OnClosing using Reactive Extensions (RX) and a Subject. Everywhere in the program that I need it, I'd subscribe to the event and perform any cleanup. This would decouple the OnClosing event from all of the subscribers that do the cleanup, and would let you place the cleanup code for the database and the heavy ...


1

You're probably closing over this, forcing the whole enclosing object to be serialized. You probably have something like the following: class Foo { val outer = ??? def f(rdd: RDD[ItemSet]): RDD[ItemSet] = { rdd.map(x => outer.g(x)) } } In this case, during the serialization of the task, Spark will need the instance of the enclosing Foo. ...



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