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5

In general thread pooling, you distinguish short-running and long-running threads based on the comparison between their start-up time and run time. Threads generally take some time to be created and get up to the point where they can start running your code. The means that if you run a large number of threads where they each take a minute to start but only ...


3

If you want to await it further up the call stack, I think you want this: public class DataAccess { private Task<MyData> _getDataTask; private readonly object lockObj = new Object(); public async Task<MyData> GetDataAsync() { lock(lockObj) { if (_getDataTask == null) { ...


3

You're not actually mutating the Job variable in the body of your method, so you shouldn't be passing it by reference at all, you should be passing it by value. That is, unless Job is actually a mutable value type instead of a reference type, in which case that is your problem and you should fix it by not using a mutable value type here. It's also worth ...


2

Without returning a Task, how could a caller find out when the async computation you presumably are running is completed? If nobody needs to know, make the method return Task and have the return value ignored. If that is not possible for some reason you can use async void. How you generate the Task to return is not important to know for callers. An easy way ...


2

Both SleepBeforeInvoke and SleepAfterInvoke have a potential deadlock in them due to the Dispatcher.Invoke call - it's just that you're that much more likely to hit it in SleepBeforeInvoke because you're creating an artificial 500ms delay where the problem will occur, as opposed to a negligible (probably nanoseconds) window in the other case. The issue is ...


2

Please rewrite your function as: public Task<MyData> GetDataAsync() { if (_getDataTask == null) { _getDataTask = Task.Run(() => synchronousDataAccessMethod()); } return _getDataTask; } This should not change at all the things that can be done with this function - you can still await on the returned task! Please tell me ...


2

Use the lock function to prevent multiple calls to the database query section. Lock will make it thread safe so that once it has been cached all the other calls will use it instead of running to the database for fulfillment. lock(StaticObject) // Create a static object so there is only one value defined for this routine { if(_getDataTask == null) { ...


2

Are there any disadvantages to doing this? Yes, you're making your code less readable, longer and less performant for no good reason. I don't see any adavantages of doing this.


1

This produces the result that your original script produced: "{ NAME => '#{schema("columns.customers.hbase.families").gsub(/'/,'')}', VERSION => 1 }" I'm not sure what task is, so I don't know whether you should expect your code to work. uniq is a method on Array which returns an Array with all duplicates removed: > [1,2,3,1,2,1].uniq # => ...


1

The text box's Text property implementation automatically marshals to the UI thread to access the textbox. The combo box's implementation doesn't do that for you, so you'll need to make sure that you access it from the UI thread yourself, rather than relying on the Text property to work from a non-UI thread. The best way to do so is as you showed, to pull ...


1

Make sure to declare Job as a Class, and not a Structure. This will allow it to be passed ByVal (the default) and work perfectly in your code as described, as it will be a reference type and mutations handled externally will be visible within your method. Since you don't change Job inside of your function, it shouldn't be passed ByRef.



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