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4

No, there is no notion of a current Task. There are arbitrarily many tasks running at the same time. Even "running" is not well defined. Is new TaskCompletionSource<object>().Task running or is it not? Create a cancellable CancellationToken and pass it to the task to make it self-cancel. Pass the underlying CancellationTokenSource to the code that ...


3

If you really do want to do the work synchronously, you know that your async method will always run synchronously, and that's desirable in the situation, then by all means, ignore the warning. If you understand what the warning is telling you and feel that the action it is describing is correct, then it's not a problem. There's a reason it's a warning and ...


2

What should determine when I choose to ignore this compiler warning? In some cases the work is so simple that spawning a thread for it is undeniably counter-productive. The compiler isn't saying "use Task.Run inside this method". It is merely telling you that you prepared him for an async method, adding the async modifier to your method declaration, ...


2

The answer is yes but just because Task is more modern. There is no fundamental difference between the threadpool and Task (assuming you mean CPU-based tasks). A more important optimization would be to make HandleRequest async. Your use of async IO for GetContext does not add one bit to scalability. The request processing must be async, not the accepting.


2

Just use InvokeAsync instead of Invoke then return the Task<int> inside the DispatcherOperation<int> the function returns. //Coding conventions say async functions should end with the word Async. public Task<int> RunOnUiAsync(Func<int> f) { var dispatcherOperation = Application.Current.Dispatcher.InvokeAsync(f); return ...


2

You can implement it by creating your own queue process. This is just a code mockup. Create an object like this public class PrioritizableTask { public PrioritizableTask(Task task, int taskPriority) { Task = task; Priority = taskPriority; } public int Priority { get; private set; } public Task Task { get; private set; ...


2

I've been looking at your problem and i did not find a built-in thread-safe sorted collection. So i built a basic thread-safe SortedSet<int> wrapper class. Sorted Set public class MyThreadSafeSortedSet { private SortedSet<int> _set = new SortedSet<int>(new MyComparer()); private readonly object _locker = new object(); public ...


1

I suspect you're looking for TaskCompletionSource<TResult>. Basically, you create one of those (and remember it), and hand back the task that it provides in the Task property. When the event is triggered, set the appropriate result/fault on the completion source, and you're done.


1

Expanding on @jonskeet 's answer: void Main() { var foo = new Foo(); //type parameter here defines the type of the Task //so here, we're expecting to make a Task<int> var tcs = new TaskCompletionSource<int>(); foo.Evt += (sender, eventArgs) => { tcs.SetResult(0); //or tcs.SetException(someException); ...


1

Use process.chdir to change the working directory. We can make the change anywhere in a gulpfile, or in your situation, change it within a task. gulp.task('frontend', function(){ process.chdir('...'); gulp.src(...) }); gulp.task('backend', function(){ process.chdir('...'); gulp.src(...) }); Make sure using the latest version of gulp, this feature ...


1

Transferring an abbreviated version of the comments into an answer. The original version of the question was asking about: Plain sort quotes.t5 and pipe the output to join. In join use field separator, read from stdin and from quotes.comms, output to quotes.t6 You need to know that join is a command. It can read from standard input if you specify - ...


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Async is useful any time you have disk/database/network I/O. It allows you to do other things while you wait for the I/O to complete, which can result in significant savings. Async isn't really useful for normal CPU bound operations, because of the increased overhead of making it async. This holds true in WPF as well web applications. If you want to see a ...


1

I am working in WPF now...here we use Background_Worker,TaskFactory.StartNew functions and async/await. You really should be using Task.Run instead of BackgroundWorker and Task.Factory.StartNew. Task.Run has much better defaults than StartNew, and is more composable and type-safe than BackgroundWorker. My question is do we really use above mentioned ...


1

I think _viewModel.SelectedItem.castInfoWithPics = castWithPicList needs to be set in the UI thread. Your donloadBitmap funciton uses a callback to process the response and that runs on a ThreadPool thread. You can use Dispatcher.Invoke to force work to occur on a UI thread. Try putting this in your callback and putting the appropriate code in the commented ...


1

Try something like: */1 * * * * sleep 1; mycommand ^^ ^^ every minute one second


1

Here, your program produces the output $ ./protected_imp coins 6 no request received for 5 secondsno request received for 5 secondsno request received for 5 seconds^C (I stopped it at that point). “coins 6” is exactly the output it should give; you’ve added 1 to the starting value (1) 5 times. The reason you get Tasking_Error if you remove the loop is ...


1

Task.Exception gets the AggregateException that caused the Task to end prematurely. If the Task completed successfully or has not yet thrown any exceptions, this will return null. Example: Task.Factory .StartNew( () => { DoSomething(); /* throws an exception */ } ) .ContinueWith( p => { ...


1

A normal cron will fail with de leap-second: 00:01:01 / 00:02:02 / 00:03:03 / .. / 00:59:59 / 01:01:00 / .. Cron is nice, so do not change it for a complete new solution. Add support in your script check_program_not_already_running if [ -f ${SLEEPFILE} ]; then sleepsecs=$(cat ${SLEEPFILE}) (( sleepsecs = sleepsecs + 1 )) sleep ${sleepsecs} else ...


1

Cron can't do this. It only handles 1-minute resolutions. You can use sleep to run a command a specified number of seconds after HH:MM:00, but it can't run a command every 61 seconds. Here's a Perl script that should do what you want: #!/usr/bin/perl use strict; use warnings; my @command = @ARGV; while (1) { sleep 61 - time % 61; system ...



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