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9

The tasks (by default) runs on the threadpool, which is just as it sounds, a pool of threads. The threadpool is optimized for a lot of situations, but throwing Thread.Sleep in there probably throws a wrench in most of them. Also, Task.Factory.StartNew is a generally a bad idea to use, because people doesn't understand how it works. Try this instead: static ...


9

In a UI environment you have a special single threaded SynchronizationContext that runs everything on the UI thread. That context is captured when you await a task and when the task completes the method resumes on that captured context (this can be configured using ConfigureAwait: SomeClass details = await ReturnARunningTask().ConfigureAwait(false); In ...


6

You are calling Retrieve() without await in the DataFromAPI constructor, That's why your method isn't awaited. You should better call this methods outside the constructor, with the await keyword like this : await Retrieve(); You have to refactor your code a little. Here's an example : public class DataService : IDataService { private ...


4

Specify TaskCreationOptions.HideScheduler when starting tasks from your custom task scheduler: Task.WaitAll(new[] { factory.StartNew(() => SomeAction("first"), TaskCreationOptions.HideScheduler), factory.StartNew(() => SomeAction("second"), TaskCreationOptions.HideScheduler) }); From MSDN: HideScheduler Prevents the ambient scheduler ...


4

I doubt any of these are suitable for your needs. Since a constructor can't be async there is no way to wait until the task you start are complete. You could call Task.Wait but that would annihilate all the benefits derived from async and you'd need to deal with the resulting deadlock. Right now the tasks you start run concurrently with the rest of the ...


3

To quote the MSDN docs: The Timeout property affects only synchronous requests made with the GetResponse method. To time out asynchronous requests, use the Abort method. You could mess around with the Abort method, but it's easier to convert from WebClient to HttpClient, which was designed with asynchronous operations in mind.


3

The Other Problem... I'll address cancellation below, but there is also a misunderstanding of the behaviour of the following code, which is going to cause issues regardless of the cancellation problem: var pictures = Observable .FromAsync<Image>(GetNextImageAsync) .Throttle(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(.5)) .Repeat() You probably think that the ...


3

With the following extension method: public static class EnumerableExtensions { public static IEnumerable<Task<TimedResult<TReturn>>> TimedSelect<TSource, TReturn>( this IEnumerable<TSource> source, Func<TSource, Task<TReturn>> func ) { if (source == null) throw new ...


3

If you don't have any asynchronous operations inside that method don't change it and keep it synchronous. use Task.Run when you call it from the UI thread to offload that synchronous work to a different thread and await the returned task: var elements = await Task.Run(() => LookupUtil.GetProducts()); What you are basically doing is treating a block of ...


3

You can use Timer::periodic to create a channel that gets sent a message at regular intervals, e.g. use std::old_io::Timer; let mut timer = Timer::new().unwrap(); let ticks = timer.periodic(Duration::minutes(5)); for _ in ticks.iter() { your_function(); } Receiver::iter blocks, waiting for the next message, and those messages are 5 minutes apart, so ...


3

But in calculate i always get value of j >= FilesDir[i].Length This isn't a concurrency issue, as your for loop is executing on a single thread. This happens because the lambda expression is closing over your i and j variables. This effect is called Closure. In order to avoid it, create a temp copy before passing both variables to Task.Run: var tempJ ...


3

You can use TaskExtensions.Unwrap() (which is an extension method on Task<Task>) to unwrap the outter task and retrieve the inner one: private async void Button2_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e) { var task = Task.FromResult(false); Task aggregatedTask = task.ContinueWith(task1 => InnerTask(task1.Result)).Unwrap(); ...


3

After first.start is accepted, first is ready to output a line whenever it gets a processor, while main carries on and calls second.start. After second.start is accepted, second outputs its 10 lines before returning control to main. But, what happens if deep within the Ada runtime system, or even the operating system, it turns out that put_line involves ...


3

There is no difference, actually. In fact, in both cases the compiler generates the same code: Task task2 = new Task(new Action((object) null, __methodptr(HelloWorld)));


3

public class JobRunner { public async Task<string> Run(bool fireAndForget) { await ShortMethodIAlwaysWantToWait(); string jobId = Guid.NewGuid().ToString("N"); if (fireAndForget) HostingEnvironment.QueueBackgroundWorkItem((token) => LongMethodICouldWantToWaitOrNot(jobId)); else await ...


2

Here is the solution: @Override protected void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) { super.onCreate(savedInstanceState); if (!isTaskRoot()) { finish(); return; } Your code.... } From here: http://code.google.com/p/android/issues/detail?id=26658#c14


2

new SynchronizationContext() returns a new default SynchronizationObject which schedules work on the thread pool (reference source). TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext() returns a task scheduler that uses SynchronizationContext.Current which you just set to the thread pool sync context using SynchronizationContext.SetSynchronizationContext. ...


2

I can't find a reason for you to have different methods that only set values (instead of properties for that matter) and a single method that runs everything. But if you want to keep this design you can do something very similar to TPL Dataflow's blocks. Have a Completion Task property that completes only when Execute completes and have DoSomething3 be ...


2

You can give tasks a ContinuationTask, which is something that is called after the task has completed. With this you can use a bunch of stopwatches and use the continuation task to individually stop them.


2

What could be possible be done to improve IO operation without wasting so much time and resources? The best answer is to make PrivateSignal asynchronous, just like the accepted answer to your last question suggested. Yes, this does mean that the base class has to change, and all the methods that call PrivateSignal have to change. They have to change in ...


2

I want to use a task queue for background stuff in my C# application. While this is possible, it's almost never the best approach. Instead of a queue of tasks, what you probably want is either to throttle the background tasks (permitting any order), or a queue of operations to execute. If you want to throttle, then check out SemaphoreSlim. If you ...


2

B2K has the right idea - you need to initialize a web request by calling the application from the outside, so it will spin up a new HttpContext to generate the HTML. You could use the advice here or here to create a background emailer. One approach is to use the initial request to stringify your email and save it in the database for later mailing. ...


2

There is no way to stop the execution of the Task after it has already finished because, by definition, it has already stopped executing. Task.Run will return the Thread Pool thread back to the thread pool, if the pool was used, or allow the allocated thread to finish and tear itself down if a new thread was used. There is nothing for you to do explicitly. ...


2

Using TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext() will tell your task to execute on the UI thread. When you call Thread.SpinWait(1000000000); the UI will become unresponsive (you will notice this if you try and do anything, such as drag the window around etc) and so the disabling of the button is not guaranteed. So initially, I would suggest you ...


2

Please check if there is any subscription to the event "TimeUpdateEvent" before calling the "checkTimeStart()" method. I think you didn't make any subscription, so on invoking that event system halts. If you will put the invocation part of the code in try catch block: try { TimeUpdateEvent.Invoke(this, new TimeUpdateEventArgs(time)); } catch (Exception ...


2

Is there any particular advantage? Usually with async methods the operation is initialized synchronously and then the wait can be asynchronous with await or syncrhnous with Wait(). The Main method can't be async so you are force to block with Wait() there or you can do a Console.ReadKey() to run until the user presses a key. Task.Run(async () => ...


2

You never start your task. You need to call Start when you use the Task constructor. Instead of calling the constructor and then Start a better option would be to use Task.Run: if(!actionContext.ModelState.IsValid) { return Task.Run(() => actionContext.Request.CreateErrorResponse(HttpStatusCode.BadRequest, ...


2

You are just forgetting to declare your method as generic (note the <T>), and actually return the result of Deserialize: public static Task<T> DeserializeAsync<T>(string xmlString) { return Task.Run(() => { return Deserialize<T>(xmlString)); }); } or more simply: public static Task<T> ...


2

This sounds like a good fit for TPL Dataflow's ActionBlock. You create a single block at the start. Set how many items it should process concurrently (i.e. 8) and post the items into it: var block = new ActionBlock<Image>( image => ProcessImage(image), new ExecutionDataflowBlockOptions { MaxDegreeOfParallelism = 8}); foreach (var image in ...



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