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32

New in .NET 4.6: The latest preview of .NET 4.6 contains a new TaskCreationOptions: RunContinuationsAsynchronously. Since you're willing to use Reflection to access private fields... You can mark the TCS's Task with the TASK_STATE_THREAD_WAS_ABORTED flag, which would cause all continuations not to be inlined. const int TASK_STATE_THREAD_WAS_ABORTED = ...


13

You're using Select incorrectly, basically. It's lazy, remember? So every time you iterate over it (once for Count() and once in WhenAll)... it's going to call your delegate again. The fix is simple: just materialize the query, e.g. with ToList(): var tasks = items.Select(async item => { if (await DoSomething(item)) { counter++ } ...


11

A) In order of task creation Task<string>[] tasks = new Task<string>()[max]; for (int i = 0; i < max; i++) { tasks[i] = GetMyDataAsync(i); } Task.WaitAll(tasks); foreach(var task in tasks) stringBuilder.Append(task.Result); B) In order that tasks finish Task<string>[] tasks = new Task<string>()[max]; for (int i ...


10

Just extract the part that uses the stream to another async method: var requests = new Task[parts.Count]; foreach (var part in parts) { var partNumber = part.Item1; var partSize = part.Item2; requests[partNumber - 1] = UploadPartAsync(partNumber, partSize); } await Task.WhenAll(requests); ... async Task ...


10

Is it illegal/bad practice to await on synchronous methods like Search()? Well it's a very bad idea, because your UI will hang, basically. You should change your Search method to SearchAsync (for the sake of convention) and use asynchronous database operations to make it properly asynchronous. Currently, you don't have any true asynchrony: everything ...


9

TL;DR: run() throws the exception, but you're awaiting WhenAny(), which doesn't throw an exception itself. The MSDN documentation for WhenAny states: The returned task will complete when any of the supplied tasks has completed. The returned task will always end in the RanToCompletion state with its Result set to the first task to complete. This is ...


9

async-await respects the current scope's SynchronizationContext. That means that the context (if it exists) is captured when the asynchronous operation starts and when it ends the continuation is scheduled on the captured context. UI applications (WPF/Winforms) use a SynchronizationContext that allows only for the main (UI) thread to interact with the UI ...


9

It's discouraged to use Task.Factory.StartNew with async-await, you should be using Task.Run instead: var t = Task.Run( async () => { Foo.Fim(); await Foo.DoBar(); }); The Task.Factory.StartNew api was built before the Task-based Asynchronous Pattern (TAP) and async-await. It will return Task<Task> because you are ...


8

As the message says: you can't do that. You could take a copy of the parameter value, and capture that, for example: public Action CallDoSomeMagic(string foo, ref string bar) { var snapshot = bar; return new Action(() => DoSomeMagic(foo, ref snapshot)); } But note that updates to snapshot are not visible outside the caller via bar. The ...


8

You need to correct your code to wait for the list to be downloaded: List<Item> list = await GetListAsync(); Also, make sure that the method, where this code is located, has async modifier. The reason why you get this error is that GetListAsync method returns a Task<T> which is not a completed result. As your list is downloaded asynchronously ...


8

You're creating a task and never starting it, so it never finishes. You should be using Task.Run to create a task that you want to start executing immediately, rather than using the Task constructor.


8

You can register an Action to be invoked when the token is canceled: token.Register(() => { /*...*/ });


8

Try the following: for (int i = 0; i < tasks.Length; i++) { var innerI = i; tasks[i] = new Task(() => engineComponents[innerI].Update(gameTime)); tasks[i].Start(); } You need a new variable for each task, which will be captured by linq expression and will hold index of your job part. Now all your tasks uses i variable and perform work on ...


8

The problem is that your lambda expression is capturing i - not the value of i, but the variable itself. That means that by the time your task executes, the loop may well be on the next iteration (or even later). So some of your components may be updated more than once, some may not be updated at all, and the final tasks are likely to execute when i is ...


8

You are waiting on the UI thread. This freezes the UI. Don't do that. In addition, you are deadlocking because Invoke waits for the UI thread to unblock. My advice: use async/await if at all possible. And please do not swallow exceptions. You're creating future work for yourself that way.


7

That's a problem of closure and capture variable, the problem is completly explained in an article by Eric Lippert To solve your problem, copy the item value at each iteration in a fresh variable : List<Task> lst_tsk = new List<Task>(); List<int> lst_item = new List<int> { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 }; foreach ...


7

A Task not being awaited or not using its Wait() or Result() method, will swallow the exception by default. This behavior can be modified back to the way it was done in .NET 4.0 by crashing the running process once the Task was GC'd. You can set it in your app.config as follows: <configuration> <runtime> ...


7

Both are. When you have code running on your CPU there's always a thread running it. The question is what happens when you don't have code to run, for example when you are waiting for an IO operation to complete. If you use async await where you should there would be no thread idly waiting for that operation to complete, and only after it has completed a ...


7

Since from what I understand about Tasks they don't create new threads to run the tasks on The Task doesn't necessarily create a new thread itself, but Task.Factory.StartNew does. It schedules the task to execute using the current task scheduler, which by default fetches a worker thread from the thread pool. Please read: ...


7

WaitAll blocks the calling thread while WhenAll provides a promise task that you can use to asynchronously wait using async-await without wasting up a thread in the meantime: async Task ProcessAsync() { await Task.WhenAll(DownloadAsync(), IntializeParserAsync(),...); } You should use WhenAll wherever you want to wait without having to block a thread, ...


7

In the .Net framework itself when you pass a CancellationToken as a parameter you will get back a TaskCanceledException. I would not go against that and create my own design pattern because people who are familiar with .Net will be familiar with your code. My guideline is this: The one that cancels the token is the one that should handle the ...


7

It looks like your client code does not finish reading the entire content: you should have a loop that reads to the end before checking the content: int remaining = d.Length; int pos = 0; while (remaining != 0) { int add = networkStream.Read(d, pos, remaining); pos += add; remaining -= add; } Currently, your code reads as much data as the ...


6

Take a look at the type of t2. It's a Task<Task>. t2 will be completed when it finishes starting the task that does the actual work not when that work actually finishes. The smallest change to your code to get it to work would be to add an unwrap after both your second and third calls to ContinueWith, so that you get out the task that represents the ...


6

Since your goal is merely to wait until the cancellation token is cancelled, you should do that. For reasons others have explained, using WhenAll on an infinite sequence of tasks isn't the way to go about that. There are easier ways to get a task that will never complete. await new TaskCompletionSource<bool>().Task .ContinueWith(t => { }, ...


6

You haven't started the task. await will wait until it completes, but it's never going to complete if it doesn't get started. Perhaps you wanted Task.Run, which creates and starts a task? (I assume that in reality, your task does something more useful...)


6

You need to call Start() on your task. Otherwise, it will never finish.


6

You can use Task.FromResult to return a completed Task. Task Something() { var x=1; // Do *something* here ;) return Task.FromResult(true); } Note that this will run synchronously, and not be an asynchronous operation, so it'd be good to document that appropriately as well.


6

You can use a Lambda Expression. You should avoid using new Task as it returns a "Cold Task" which means that the Task has to be started using Start(). Use Task.Run instead. static Task<int> MathOperation(int number) { return Task.Run(() => TestMethod(number)); }


6

Task.Delay does not occupy some other thread. It gives you a task without blocking. It starts a timer that completes that task in its callback. The timer does not use any thread while waiting. It is a common myth that async actions like delays or IO just push work to a different thread. They do not. They use OS facilities to truly use zero threads while the ...


6

I don't think there's anything in TPL which would provides explicit API control over TaskCompletionSource.SetResult continuations. I decided to keep my initial answer for controlling this behavior for async/await scenarios. Here is another solution which imposes asynchronous upon ContinueWith, if the tcs.SetResult-triggered continuation takes place on the ...



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